Khyber53

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Khyber53 last won the day on March 17

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About Khyber53

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    I'm a believer
  • Birthday January 1

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  1. I keep writing, but you aren't reading. One more time: he wasn't speaking of taxes as charity, but as a duty, something one had to do within their society. And on the wealthy man, please refer to his admonishment of Timothy. And that's as far as we're going with this. Either you get it or you don't. I can't explain it more simply. Beyond this, you're just trolling for an argument and attention.
  2. Sorry to see you go. I've enjoyed your posts and insights. I've learned quite a few things from reading your stuff and I appreciate your take on things, even when I might not agree with it. Best of the world to you and I hope you find some peaceful times ahead. Make the most of them. And if you come back someday, I'll be glad to see you here. But yeah, this ain't the same place it once was. I took a couple of years off from here and it helped, but it has been on the slide. Even the mods aren't interested in it anymore.
  3. I'm so sorry that you are too stupid to understand this, even after it has been explained, repeated and explained again. By Jesus' own words, taxation is not theft or robbery. It appears that you can't accept that idea. Someday you might and I wish you the best until then.
  4. I'm very familiar with the passage and the events that brought about His answer. Yes, the response was savvy, but He also didn't lie. There's another important passage about a widow donating her last two coins while the rich man donated more, but less, too. I'm sure you can massage that to nuance something to assuage your soul, but really, when it comes down to it all, there are some folks on the Conservative side that preach long and hard about following Jesus. The problem is that when they get to the part about taking care of the sick, the poor, the incarcerated and the downtrodden, they suddenly have a host of excuses and want to start parsing the wording so that they don't have to look at themselves and say, "Man, I'm supposed to be there for the less fortunate, but nah, not really. I mean, yeah, Salvation and all, but now we're talking about my hard-earned money." They always want the New Testament's forgiveness to apply to themselves, and they delight in the Old Testament being visited upon other folks. Outside of religion, they're also the ones who think it's a crying shame that "those people" don't have the means to fix themselves and then shake it off with the rationalization that those folks probably got themselves into that mess in the first place. We're all guilty of that to some degree, sadly, myself included.
  5. He didn't equate it with charity, but with duty. Really, read the Gospels. Any translation.
  6. Hate to bring up the Apostle Matthew and all, but... maybe you haven't read the Book, just the memes. Jesus hung out with a number of tax collectors.
  7. Yeah, I have to agree with PhillyB on this one. You really need to reassess yourself and how you look at women. Really, get some perspective because you are sowing seeds of a lot of trouble. And if you keep banging everything that comes along man, you're going to catch something you can't get rid of... herpes, HIV or a child support check or two.
  8. Oh heck, live a little! We've got a shot!
  9. Right, it certainly isn't. And let's be honest and drill down here that the root cause of a lot of these shootings is fear. Fear on the parts of the public and the police officers. We can all be keyboard warriors and fan the flames and rhetoric running through our society, but at each traffic stop there are people going through a tense situation with all of that going on in the background, subtly or overtly influencing their actions. We need to find a way to back down, take deep breaths and de-escalate. Castille wasn't shot because a police officer went out that night wanting to kill a black man. He was killed because when he said "I have a gun" the policeman's immediately went into threat-to-his-life mode and then a million other micro-prejudices and fears went into play. The outcome was horrible and to our eyes totally avoidable.
  10. Keep adding store bought chili powder and it will eventually taste like crap, definitely not chili.
  11. Sad to say but I don't know the time of day when this happened, what the visibility in the area was or if something else in the area (a car backfiring at just the wrong moment, a dog barking or a door slamming) may have set the officer off to pull the trigger the second time. It could have been that the natural human fight or flight reflex triggered that the fight was still on. I can't say much about that, because I wasn't there and I have no idea what was going through the minds of either the officer or the man who was shot and killed. I do know two things were factors in this, two things that we, as a society need to think long and hard about. This altercation started because of the possibility of a drug deal. That's the first part and we really, really need to think through our drug laws because what we have is not working and are pushing things to deadly effects, both in law enforcement and the drug trade. Decades of negative experience and little progress should have enlightened us by now. Secondly, we escalate to guns too quickly in this country. This is an issue separate from gun ownership entirely. In stress situations, even moreso in public vs public confrontations than in police vs public confrontations, things escalate to the use of guns too quickly for any thoughts to be given to alternatives. How do we back it down, though? Any thoughts, anyone? Any solutions? Everyone's quick to draw their blamethrowers and spray down the crowd, so how about turning self righteousness into something productive for society? Should we partially disarm police? Should we simply draw back their weaponry to revolvers only? Should we go the other way and armor and arm our policemen to the point that their mere presence would brook no argument? Should we decriminalize non-addictive narcotics? Should we decriminalize all narcotics? Should we go the other route and hypercriminalize the dealing of drugs? How about we turn Madison Avenue loose on this and start marketing a "Respect -- Don't Shoot" type campaign aimed at both the public at large and the police that should be there to protect it? Anyone have any ideas? Because if we keep going down these streets the way we are, a lot of good neighborhoods and bad ones are going to combust.
  12. I think the big fallacy that most people fall into is that the 2015 season was something of a fluke and that it was just business as usual in the NFC South for a team to win big and then fall fast. They forget that the team was a playoff contender in three of the last four seasons, instead working the angle that 2015 was just catching lightning in a bottle. The truth is this team, since the arrival of Gettleman, has been built to compete. It leans heavily on Cam, but there's strength throughout and the kind of depth you see in perennial contenders for the championship. We have coaching continuity and veterans who want to be here and build a legacy. This is a team built to make it to the playoffs and that means it is meant to take on the well-QB'd teams like the Saints and Falcons and grind out enough wins to spin them out of the playoffs each year. We regularly do that. And in 2016, even with an injury-riddled and -rattled team, we were competitive in most of the games we lost. 2015 wasn't the anomaly, it was part of the norm. 2016 was the fluke, one caused by a Superb Owl hangover, a short offseason and some very key injuries. We'll take the NFC South again this year, that's what we're built to do. And once you get in the playoffs, you've always got a chance.
  13. Not a Panther, not sure why I should care.
  14. Honestly, this is probably going to be Olsen's last contract. Timewise he is probably on the downslope of his career, skills and capabilities-wise he is still at the top of his game. He's been through the lean times with us and been to the top of the mountain with us as well. Never a complaint, never a sign of giving up. I think, if you are G-man hearing this (and barring an unspoken injury to Olsen that none of us know about), you'd have to sit Olsen down and say, "How many years do you want to play before retirement? What do you feel is fair for your services?" Then you pay the guy. This isn't a one season wonder. This isn't the QB's third best option on every play. This isn't a guy who is still trying to reach his peak. This isn't a guy who just got cut loose by another team and is marked as a high dollar free agent. This is a guy who puts on our uniform, lives the life and produces consistently on and off the field. He scores touchdowns, gets the hard yards and makes a huge, positive impact in the community. Heck, he might even be a Hall of Famer someday. He's that good and he's that important to the team identity. And guys like Olsen just don't happen very often. Pay the man.
  15. Some days, I think we may be pretty close to a "let them eat cake" moment.