PhillyB

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About PhillyB

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    antimesoblitzomorphism
  • Birthday 08/30/1985

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  • Gender Male
  • Location third spur east of the sun
  • Interests 19th century nautical literature

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PhillyB's Activity

  1. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    well, not humans, obviously. my point is that culture is relative in this case, which means it's relative to something, which means it's subject to change, which means something has to change it
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  2. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    if cultural traditions and norms can flux with the introduction of new logics and ways of thinking, could it stand to reason that just because something is culturally bound doesn't mean it's necessarily the best way to think about/do/approach a thing?
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  3. PhillyB added a post in a topic PP facing real problems now   

    was it this one?

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  4. PhillyB added a post in a topic PP facing real problems now   

    actually if the argument is simply whether or not abortion is murder, it's a good comparison
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  5. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    to me the entire cavalcade of ethical questions surrounding animal rights can be spawned and summed by asking whether or not chimpanzees should have human rights. if yes, then this forces us to ask what non-human traits in other species should inspire rights. if no, then we need to ask what happens when the lines become blurred between humans and non-humans.
    say, hypothetically, a bunch of hardcore trekkers are hiking through the deepest, most remote parts of the appalachian mountains. say they stumble across a hollow filled with a group of people who immediately strike them as completely different. they realize, very quickly, that something's strange. they don't have a spoken language and they're stouter, stumpier, and behave in odd ways that reflect human interaction - they cook food, wear some clothes, have social hierarchies - but they are clearly something entirely different.
    a bunch of scientists come to the hollow to see what's up, and they figure out pretty quickly that a bunch of colonial immigrants got isolated in the hollow and by some force over hundreds of years they lost their language skills. feral children theories abound: that children with weak language skills survived some massacre and rebuilt their society. their appearances have changed over hundreds of years with a limited gene pool and adaptation to the unique ecology of the environment. they treat the scientists warily, with mute caution, interacting on perimeters, but unable to communicate. they are, for all intents and purposes, another species.
    in this outlandish and hypothetical scenario, the immediate question posed by public policy makers becomes quite simple: what do we do with them? do we study them? do we send in anthropologists? do they have the right to be left alone? do they have rights at all? what are they? are they human? what defines humanity? is the existence of definable culture, self-reflexivity, and social hierarchies enough to consider them human? are they subject to human laws, or human punishments? 
    however one answers these questions, they are roundly applicable to similar questions of rights of non-human primates. and that's where things get tricky, because allowing for rights for any other species requires a system of metrics by which worthiness of rights is measured. if, for instance, intelligence is a metric, then pigs carry a whole new level of importance and ethical prerogative. lines get blurred, poo gets fuzzy.
    the above hypothetical scenario is a portal into the kinds of questions we need to ask when determining how to treat cases like cecil the lion. i'll say it again: i'm as outraged as anyone else. non-subsistence hunts are sickening and hearken back to archaic colonialist practices that don't belong in modern society. but if you lure cecil the warthog or cecil the dik-dik and kill him, it never hits national press. they don't equate culturally, obviously, but shouldn't the disparity of response command a careful analysis of what metrics we're using to judge the morality of what animals we're killing?
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  6. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    to be honest i'm not sure of my ground here. i think things really get interesting when you start asking questions that determine the worthiness of one animal to live over another, and trying to find the answer leads to finding situations like cecil the lion much more complex.
    not because it makes cecil's death any less outrageous, but because it possibly makes many more deaths much more so.
    isn't value of species diversity a human cultural trait, and therefore also kind of arbitrary? why is the life of a single endangered species innately more valuable than another life of equal or higher intelligence (or any other metric of value)?
    how do non-human primates figure into the equation? asking this question forces us into nebulous ethical territory, because defining ethics by humanity leads us to the territory of living beings straddling the cultural fence between humans (they exhibit culture) and animals.
    is killing a chimp worse than killing a lion? is killing a lion worse than killing a squirrel? is cultural value a random assignment? does it vary cross-culturally? is it dumb?
    i'm really not trying to be a neckbeard poking holes in cultural norms because i'm above them. i find this as outrageous as all of you. but this is a deep rabbit hole and imo it's a conversation worth having, as the ramifications are far-reaching.
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  7. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    besides culturally relative adoration, what standards are we using to judge the worthiness of an animal? why are some lives worth more than others?
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  8. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    i'm not arguing it's not culturally fuged up, i'm arguing that culture sometimes appropriates things weirdly. pigs are highly intelligent animals but no one gets mad when they die by the truckload.
    my point in bringing it up is not to excuse the act or diminish it (i've been clear that i think it's terrible and he's scum) but i can't help but feel ridiculous turning bright red over a dude killing killing a lion when idgaf that, say, pigs die.
    yes, i get that the guy didn't kill the lion to eat it (which is why we're killing pigs) but if this was a guy who lured a popular pig out of a pig farm and shot it i wouldn't give two shits. my posts are more an indictment of my own internal conflict on the arbitrary nature of cultural selection of some animals as more highly valued than others, not a criticism of general outrage, of which i partake.
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  9. PhillyB added a post in a topic Looks like Cincinnati is next   

    police are taught from day one of BLET that a car is a deadly weapon (which it is) and any use of the weapon by a perp is cause for return fire with intent to kill.
    add in a police culture of covering for each other and betraying citizen to save brother and you're ripe for these sorts of things happening the moment some clown gets the opportunity to act out his fantasy of gunning down a thug.
    i've mentioned before that i have a key informant that's a former atlanta metro police officer that's told me horror stories of internal cover-ups that encourage and protect police brutality and nearly indiscriminate killing. it's staggering to imagine the number of wrongful deaths that've never seen the light of day when you consider the alternative, non-body-cam scenario of the cops corroborating each others' stories and the case being closed before the body's cold.
    LEO ROI reform should be a bipartisan effort.
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  10. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    that's not what i'm saying at all. i'm saying we attribute certain traits and personal connections to animals which are independent of the animal's cognitive abilities or rate of slaughter. reading about this dude killing the lion elicits a visceral gut reaction that pisses me off, and i think he's a giant scumbag, but i also recognize that getting mad just because it's a lion is kind of silly when zillions of pigs get zapped every year.
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  11. PhillyB added a post in a topic Cecil the lion   

    i don't really care if people kill animals. people have been killing animals since the beginning of time. i also don't think it's logical to get any more outraged over a lion's death than, say, a pig's, especially considering the latter are industrially slaughtered.
    but killing for the sake of killing is some fuged up poo. that dick is standing around shirtless holding up dead animals because he thinks it makes him look like a total badass. what a douche.
    also it's pathetic that game hunters defend it as "helping conservation." it helps conservation because the money they pay to destroy another life for the sake of destroying another life goes towards conservation. if they gave a flying poo about conservation they'd donate the money and show up to the park on a bus with a pair of binoculars and a camera.
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  12. PhillyB added a post in a topic Why your team sucks: Atlanta Falcons   

    buzzfeed-style all-caps narrativity for hilarity has definitely jumped the shark
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  13. PhillyB added a post in a topic Buh bye Stephen Hill   

    we'll miss that blazing speed
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  14. PhillyB added a post in a topic Looks like Cincinnati is next   

    if touchdown jesus was black he'd be dead
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  15. PhillyB added a post in a topic Foxnews race baits and hit it big with their base   

    it would be an interesting social experiment to bring all of those commenters onto the huddle for free accounts and see whose tinderbox posts they all pie
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