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First Job Interview (Post College)

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So I have an associate's degree in Multimedia and am pursuing a bachelors in Marketing. I've been out of school for a month and have been working at a gas station for 6 years. Now it's time for real life. I just had a phone interview for a full time video editor position at my local news station. It's WTNH in New Haven, Connecticut. I'm am freaking the fuck out. We talked for about 20 minutes and even though I'm under qualified (job preferred professional experience) the guy was really impressed with my final project and liked my personality. He's going to call me to come in for an interview sometime next week. I'm not sure about the salary but the job is full time with benefits. The hours are not ideal 1am - 10am but I'm really trying to get my foot in the door. 

 

Now for the love of god help me with what to expect going in and what I can do to prepare.

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Drink more alcohol?
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Drink more alcohol?

?

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Wear a tuxedo.
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speaking as someone who just scored his second tv job...don't panic.  TV really is just that simple.  Catastrophes happen, technology breaks, people get stressed and pissed and can't deal with it sometimes, but just be easygoing and take it as it comes.  Even more importantly, absorb everything they tell you.  Never be afraid to just listen and watch and learn everything you can because sometimes you'll have to figure stuff out anyway and it's easier if you have some degree of an idea where this wire or that wire goes (speaking more from the MCO side of things, anyway.)

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speaking as someone who just scored his second tv job...don't panic.  TV really is just that simple.  Catastrophes happen, technology breaks, people get stressed and pissed and can't deal with it sometimes, but just be easygoing and take it as it comes.  Even more importantly, absorb everything they tell you.  Never be afraid to just listen and watch and learn everything you can because sometimes you'll have to figure stuff out anyway and it's easier if you have some degree of an idea where this wire or that wire goes (speaking more from the MCO side of things, anyway.)

We need to become best friends.

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best thing you can do is relax and be yourself.  This won't be your last opportunity, and it won't be your end all be all, so there's no need to stress about it.  You also don't want to give a false impression of someone you're not.  Editing video at a TV station will give you some great experience, so that's great.  Make sure you're also interviewing them.  See if you like them and like the job they are offering.  You do want to get a good job that will give you some good experience, but you don't want to get stuck in some pooty situation that you'll hate and will give you a bad taste.  There are plenty of other opportunities out there, so you don't have to jump at the first one and you don't need to get worked up over trying to be perfect.

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Be urself. Be calm and polite.
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you can always let your rich parents jumpstart your new real estate business as a back up.  Wendy's salads for everyone!

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Dust off a panthers polo

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Dust off a panthers polo

Question. If they offer me the job but are Patriot fans do I walk out?

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Question. If they offer me the job but are Patriot fans do I walk out?


Nope

Offer blow job.
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Question. If they offer me the job but are Patriot fans do I walk out?


Accept job. Convert them to Panthers fans... If they won't convert, kill em all.

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Accept job. Convert them to Panthers fans... If they won't convert, kill em all.

If they don't I'll post of pic of Cammy Cam on the evening news.

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Accept job. Convert them to Panthers fans... If they won't convert, kill em all.

 

Looks like I'm not needed here.

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Dust off a panthers polo


This exactly.

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When I first started out after college it was a very surreal thing. Some people are in dead end positions, they are jaded and bitter. They will hate you for moving up the ladder. Other people will look at you with nostalgia about their professional careers, men making 5 times your salary will envy your youth and help you as they were once helped.

 

If I can suggest anything it would be to treat your career as the 2nd most important thing behind your family. If someone ever asks you to do something, never answer "no". Take advantage of your youth, master every piece of new technology, learn every new skill. Make your boss groan when you put in for vacation because his business suffers without you. And don't ever burn a bridge.

 

Don't look at your job as low paying or bad hours. The biggest mistake young people make is expect good hours and high pay in their 20s. You should view it more as an extension of college. Every day will be a test. You put in the work to build a reputation and relationships then use that equity to move up.

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And for God's sake. Dress like an adult. Nobody will take you serious if you show up to work in tshirts and shorts.

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And for God's sake. Dress like an adult. Nobody will take you serious if you show up to work in tshirts and shorts.

 

 

Hey, watch it.

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An interview is a two-way street. Come prepared with your own questions. Ask what the career ladder is for your position. Ask what their 5-year plan is, and the direction they see the station going. Going in only prepared to answer questions makes it look like you're desperate to take any offer. When it comes to the questions they ask you, don't BS, answer confidently, and don't just hit them with rehearsed, boilerplate responses to common questions from the LinkedIn home page. He likes your personality already, so be genuine.

 

If someone ever asks you to do something, never answer "no".

 

Good advice generally, but I disagree here.

Be willing to help our and put in extra time, of course. But first, know your limits. Take on too much, and you won't be able to meet your deadline, or you will deliver a half-assed product, or, since you are working in TV, the area in which you were hired to work will suffer. Fug up, then no one remembers you were the "take-on-all-comers dynamo who always is willing to pitch in," you're just the guy who fugged up. I used to be the dynamo, then my manager told me that when they were asking in a meeting for someone to volunteer to do a task and I volunteered, they weren't really looking for a young gun to step up to the plate, they wanted a guy who was slacking to actually do his job, and I was taking on too much and needed to work on what he hired me to do. It was good advice.

 

Know what you need to accomplish, and do it to the best of your ability. The best motivation I ever got was the first time I got to work on a $100+ Million proposal. The last two days, I was in charge of production; actually printing, organizing, assembling the proposal documents, and ensuring they were delivered to the client on time. My manager came up to me, and said, "I know you'll do a good job...Fug this up and you're fired."

 

And that's pretty much how I approach every job now. I do a the best job I can do, because if I fug up, I'll probably get fired. So don't fug up.

 

 

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I didn't say take on more work than you can handle. Just never answer "no". And in the same vein never answer a question "I don't know." If there is a reason you cannot take on additional work or hours, explain why, be polite but direct. If someone asks you a question and you do not have the answer say "I don't know, but I will find out and get back to you asap".

 


 

Good advice generally, but I disagree here.

Be willing to help our and put in extra time, of course. But first, know your limits. Take on too much, and you won't be able to meet your deadline, or you will deliver a half-assed product, or, since you are working in TV, the area in which you were hired to work will suffer. Fug up, then no one remembers you were the "take-on-all-comers dynamo who always is willing to pitch in," you're just the guy who fugged up. I used to be the dynamo, then my manager told me that when they were asking in a meeting for someone to volunteer to do a task and I volunteered, they weren't really looking for a young gun to step up to the plate, they wanted a guy who was slacking to actually do his job, and I was taking on too much and needed to work on what he hired me to do. It was good advice.

 

Know what you need to accomplish, and do it to the best of your ability. The best motivation I ever got was the first time I got to work on a $100+ Million proposal. The last two days, I was in charge of production; actually printing, organizing, assembling the proposal documents, and ensuring they were delivered to the client on time. My manager came up to me, and said, "I know you'll do a good job...Fug this up and you're fired."

 

And that's pretty much how I approach every job now. I do a the best job I can do, because if I fug up, I'll probably get fired. So don't fug up.

 

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Shave


Sent from my iPhone

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Be yourself, stay calm, and don't BS.

 

Also, lots of folks tend to over talk in these settings, you need to just have a normal back and forth.

 

Every job interview I have ever gone on I walk in there "knowing" that I will get an offer.

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Like KP said: work so hard that when you schedule vacations it's painful for your boss. Be the "go to" guy that boss can rely on for anything.


My first post college interview my boss said it best "I want people that want my job." I used that statement throughout my career and let my other bosses know that. Not in a competitive way but that I wanna learn everything available to me.

As for the interview: learn about the company, have good questions ready to ask, and dress for success. The best question you can ask is "how can I make this department better. What are you looking for to improve on?" when they answer that question, reply with skills that you have that can help that company improve based on his answer.

The beginnings of interviews are always the most nerve racking. Shake the interviewers hand, look them directly in the eye and look genuinely happy to be given the opportunity to sit down and talk with them. Be confident that this job is yours and you just wanna know if it's a good fit for you and ask questions accordingly.

 

you're gonna be fine Dex, just remember millions upon millions of people have been in the same boat as you right now. If you botch it, there will be plenty more so don't freak out.

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Mirroring. Copy your interviewer's subtle mannerisms, pace of speech, tone of voice.

I do this all the time with people I meet in business. It's highly influential, because it gives the other person a false sense of agreement and friendship.


Sent from my iPhone while admiring feet using CarolinaHuddle
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