Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

hepcat

Struggling to find a new job

Recommended Posts

On 5/23/2017 at 1:41 PM, Paa Langfart said:

Good luck to anyone trying to find a decent job if they are over the age of 50, unless you are some sort of corporate big shot.  You young folks better be some place stable by the time you hit 40.

I retired from the Navy in '93 at the ripe old age of 38.

I retired from Lowe's when I was 56. 

I was approached about a job less than 3 months later with a Washington DC consulting company who had a Virginia office. I worked there for 2 years until my wife took a position in NC and we moved. 

Within 6 months I was back at work for a municipality in a management position. 

I think as long as you take care of yourself, remain healthy and mentally focused, you'll be fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Zaximus said:

This also depends on your location.   In Charlotte, with a couple years of experience doing support (with no certs, nothing) you can probably get a gig making at least $20 an hour through a staffing firm or even direct hire.   This is because there's a lot of jobs right now available. 

Austin - and it's hyper competitive. There are people with Masters degrees working at coffee shops here. The "overeducated millennial working a job beneath them paradigm" is a real thing here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


1 hour ago, hepcat said:

Austin - and it's hyper competitive. There are people with Masters degrees working at coffee shops here. The "overeducated millennial working a job beneath them paradigm" is a real thing here.

Gotta be honest here man....you need to leave Austin.  I know it's cool, and hip, and every other word....but you need to start considering your life long term.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, hepcat said:

I've always thought this might be the case. Working a state job didn't really offer me much chance to move up. I am definitely working on getting certs. Do you think it might be wise to say I've only worked at my job for 2 years or something? Say I was a freelance musician/audio engineer before that and got this job to have something stable? I've thought about that.

I would never recommend that someone not be completely honest on a resume.  If I found out someone had outright lied on a resume Id walk to their desk and walk them out on the spot without regard for how well they were doing.  Its a complete non-starter for me.

 

Instead you should include a cover letter that touches on the lack of upward mobility in your job and highlight that its a big deal for you to feel like there is room to grow.

More than that, and Im sorry if Im reading you wrong here, you need to look at this as your gig and music as your hobby.  IT is so competitive that if you cant really pour yourself into it 60-70-80 hours a week you'll fall behind.  I'm not talking work hours as much as I am talking about how much time you devote to your job and then self study/side projects outside of the 40-50 you'll put on the clock.  You have to be the guy in the break room talking up some new tech or programming trick (even if you're a systems guy you have to know a couple scripting languages).  Employers have too many options to invest in people who are just looking for a steady gig with benefits.

 

The very first question I ask in any interview is this:

Why are you a _______________ (programmer/network engineer/etc...)?

If the answer is anything that doesn't boil down to "Because I spend most of my free time doing this anyway so I might as well get paid" then the candidate is already in a hole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Inimicus said:

I would never recommend that someone not be completely honest on a resume.  If I found out someone had outright lied on a resume Id walk to their desk and walk them out on the spot without regard for how well they were doing.  Its a complete non-starter for me.

 

Instead you should include a cover letter that touches on the lack of upward mobility in your job and highlight that its a big deal for you to feel like there is room to grow.

More than that, and Im sorry if Im reading you wrong here, you need to look at this as your gig and music as your hobby.  IT is so competitive that if you cant really pour yourself into it 60-70-80 hours a week you'll fall behind.  I'm not talking work hours as much as I am talking about how much time you devote to your job and then self study/side projects outside of the 40-50 you'll put on the clock.  You have to be the guy in the break room talking up some new tech or programming trick (even if you're a systems guy you have to know a couple scripting languages).  Employers have too many options to invest in people who are just looking for a steady gig with benefits.

 

The very first question I ask in any interview is this:

Why are you a _______________ (programmer/network engineer/etc...)?

If the answer is anything that doesn't boil down to "Because I spend most of my free time doing this anyway so I might as well get paid" then the candidate is already in a hole.

I'm not suggesting lying on my resume, rather rearranging how the dates are structured to imply I've moved around more than I actually have. In my time working for the state I've technically had three job titles and worked for three different companies. If I list all of them on my resume it looks like I had three different jobs despite it really being the same job at the same location for 6 years. 

And I agree with everything you're saying. I've thought about it a lot. I agree it's better to whole-ass one thing than to half-ass a bunch of things. You talk about honesty, well the problem for me is I'm honestly not as interested in IT as music. There are people who have devoted just as much time to learning about computers as I have to learning about music. I can play 5 instruments which is like knowing coding languages for programmers. I'm a professional audio engineer and I've written, recorded, mixed, and sold songs to licensing agencies. Problem is those deals are few and far between and don't pay that great.

I'm never going to be as passionate about IT as I am about music. I can't fake interest in something I find to be just acceptable. At the end of my life I know I'd regret saying "I really did a great job with this IT work that no one is going to remember" over "I wrote songs people are still listening to today". I'm really not a slouch, I've been told by many people up and down the industry I'm a great songwriter.

So you can see why I'm frustrated. I can be a musician, be extremely poor, probably be alone because what woman wants to spend her life with someone who is making minimum wage their whole life, and be unhappy because I'm alone, poor, and living in squaller. Or I can work in IT (or various other industries that I feel "meh" about), give up or greatly reduce the amount of time I spend playing music, live in a decent house and have enough to maybe retire one day, but be full of regret because I know I didn't do the things in music I was capable of. And maybe also be alone because of that reason. What woman wants to be with a man who is deeply unhappy doing something they aren't passionate about. Either way I'm unhappy in some way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good luck man- how do you like austin 

was thinking about maybe trying to do my residency there 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, thefuzz said:

Gotta be honest here man....you need to leave Austin.  I know it's cool, and hip, and every other word....but you need to start considering your life long term.

 

I heard something the other day that made perfect sense to me. I was obviously aware of the Austin craze a few years back when interest began peaking and the real estate market began a recovery long before the rest of the country.

Someone said, "Austin is outgrowing Austin."

Remember Charlotte in 1990 and what happened over the next 20 years? Very comparable and many of the same issues associate with such rapid economic growth, development and population: real estate, infrastructure (traffic), employment competition, etc. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




On 5/25/2017 at 2:40 PM, hepcat said:

, be extremely poor, probably be alone because what woman wants to spend her life with someone who is making minimum wage their whole life, and be unhappy because I'm alone, poor, and living in squaller. Or I can work in IT (or various other industries that I feel "meh" about), give up or greatly reduce the amount of time I spend playing music, live in a decent house and have enough to maybe retire one day, but be full of regret because I know I didn't do the things in music I was capable of. And maybe also be alone because of that reason. What woman wants to be with a man who is deeply unhappy doing something they aren't passionate about. Either way I'm unhappy in some way.

You seem to be super concerened about finding a woman , I can understand though I've been single for 8 years and its not really a coincidence considering ive had all min wage jobs or close to it since i finished college in 2013. 

poo at least you have this IT stuff . Alot of my friends majored in computer science or business and I was that one dumbass that majored in something utterly useless , thus being unemployable from anything besides non-skilled labor retail/food joint jobs. I admit I don't have poo I'm passionate about but I can understand you saying you want to do what makes you happy. But If I had a choice to go back to around the time I graduated high school and "redo" my early adult life , I'd be alot less focused on hapiness and more foucsed on practicality of getting a good job soon instead of assuming im going to get a doctorate or professional level degree and racking up untold debt in the attempt to do so. Or hell I'd even join a military branch I'd probably would have been much better off right now in my mid 20s like a lot of my old classmates from gradeschool are just starting to get good paying positions and houses/families and I'm still working poo jobs that a 16 year old high schooler in decent physical shape could easily do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/25/2017 at 9:59 PM, SOJA said:

good luck man- how do you like austin 

was thinking about maybe trying to do my residency there 

 

What do you want out of a city? Austin has great weather 8-9 months out of the year (June, July, August...it's miserable), there's tons of stuff to do in way of music, film, outdoors stuff, etc. The problem with that is it's starting to be more like California with prices and quality of housing, there's a wait to do almost anything worth doing in this town especially when school is in session at UT, and traffic is beyond horrible. So depending on what you want you can make a great life here, or it might chew you up and spit you right back out. Austin is definitely not for everyone, but if you can fit into the style of the city it can be a great place to live.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am retiring in about 8 years or so.  If you can wait that long, you can have my job.  Pays well,  and it doesn't matter where you live since you can work remote, and the management is great, but its boring as hell.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an update on this - my girlfriend redid my resume for me and it seemed to do a lot of good. I started getting a lot more responses and interviews. I'm far along in the interview process with two companies right now and one is looking like they are going to make me an offer. I'll update when I have more info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites



  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      18,880
    • Most Online
      2,867

    Newest Member
    GeauxSainz
    Joined
  • Topics

×