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electro's horse

throwing a football has four components, from a kinesthesiology standpoint

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1. your feet. they serve a few purposes. They offer a steady base for the rest of your body to do work. That should be pretty clear. Obviously it's more difficult to do something if the rest of your body is moving. Many sports are based entirely on how good you are while moving, which takes that factor out of the equation. It's important to keep them for this example, however. 

They also act as a transitional fulcrum for body momentum. If say I'm going to hit a golf ball, my body weight and momentum is going to transfer through my feet as i swing, ideally back to forward. This again goes back to the base idea, that while the feet are in place, power is shifting. 

Lastly, they sort of direct your energy. IE where they point, energy is going. Imagine throwing a ball in from left field to home plate. If I'm facing home plate and crow hop to the left, it's not likely that baseball is going to go to the catcher. It's going to pull left. 

2. Next are your hips. For almost all sports, hips are where the power comes in. A lot of times when we talk about leg strength (shoot free throws with your legs) we're really talking about your hips. With the throw, hips serve as the sorts of grounding point for the rotational portion of your core. Anyone that has thrown a baseball or softball, or swung a golf club, or a tennis racquet, has been told to set your hips, or lead with your hips. Good hip placement allows the abs and obliques to work, creating that power through the middle.

3. Then comes the shoulder. The shoulder is a poorly evolved joint that damages easily and doesn't really do its job well. Keep in mind we're still just walking on all fours, except our front legs have a little more mobility and we don't use them to walk. This is why we have subluxed biceps tendons, and rotator cuff/SLAP tears, and dislocated shoulders etc. 

For a football throw, it's main job is to channel the power generated from the hips into the accuracy portion of the throw, which we'll get to next. The more focused that portion of the throw is, the easier it will be to do intricate tasks, like throwing. With football, you generally want that to be very quick and concise. 

To illustrate, shoot a three pointer. Now, sit down in a chair and shoot a three pointer. For the casual basketball player, it will be very difficult to hit that shot. We don't have the power coming from our hips. For the pro, they might be able to do it because they're strong enough, but they will quickly fatigue, simply because we don't have a lot of muscles to recruit in the shoulder and forearm region. 

4. lastly are the wrists/hands. These are your accuracy muscles, the ones that put the spin on the tennis shot, or the baseball, or the football. Everything prior to this has been power; now we're getting to the finesse. If you can't put those various sports specific spins on the ball, you're going to have a hard time with accuracy. Try shooting a free throw without flicking your wrists; you're just heaving it at that point.

Yeah, you might be strong enough with everything else to get it in, but it's going to be far more difficult. The most famous example of this was shaquille o'neil, who broke his wrists when he was a child. he could not put any spin on the ball because his wrists didn't bend backwards, and and such he had no touch on his free throw. 

So, feet->hips->shoulder->wrist

you don't need all those things; people throw on the run all the time. But the more moving parts you put into this equation, and the more functions you take out, the more difficult it becomes. If you're running to your right, it's going to be very difficult to throw to your left. If you're moving backwards, it will be very difficult to put forward momentum into a pass, to say nothing of its accuracy. 

Depending on the talent in different parts of the equation, you can make up for inadequacies elsewhere, for a time; eventually, things will catch up with you.

And that's where we are with Cam. 

Cam never had great footwork, no one will argue that. He'd have it from time to time sure, but consistency is a skill, and it's not one he ever possessed. 

Still, he was so strong elsewhere it didn't matter most of the time. He could use his core and shoulders to muscle it in. 

But now his shoulder is hurt as well. 

Different QBs would be able to then lean on their mechanics to help them through, but Cam has never had those. On top of that, his ankle is hurt as well, so that driving/planting/transfer mechanism is disrupted as well. 

Cam physically can't throw, as evidenced by the game today. He is damaged goods as he goes out there. This isn't a bashing cam post, or a sign kaepernick thread or whatever. He simply cannot physically do his job at this point.

The Panthers should shut him down until he can. Doesn't matter how good he was in 2015. The worst defense in the history of the NFL just shut him down.

And it's because of injury.  

Edited by electro's horse
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F=MA

the dudes shoulder is bunk no doubt, and my feeling is his ankle has always had problems. Hence the "poor" footwork.

another thought and observation is he plays much better in no huddles or up tempos where he calls his own plays or strings. 

Thats the play caller who also is hamstrung by the coaches direction.

its all a big cluster F. Make an equation for that.

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You already know more than Dorsey.  Maybe you should be the QB coach?  Hell somebody needs to step up.

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I think he's hurt too and shouldn't be playing until he's 100%. Unfortunately, I don't believe he'll be 100% until next season 

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25 minutes ago, Jon Snow said:

You already know more than Dorsey.  Maybe you should be the QB coach?  Hell somebody needs to step up.

there's only so much a qb coach can do. generally, just like in tennis, their job is more to make tiny adjustments or identify bad habits as they're forming.

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2 minutes ago, electro's horse said:

there's only so much a qb coach can do. generally, just like in tennis, their job is more to make tiny adjustments or identify bad habits as they're forming.

It's obvious Dorsey hasn't/can't do anything to correct these issues so now what?  Say oh well maybe the next QB won't have these issues to correct?

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