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Understanding the NFL, NFLPA, CBA and the Lockout Year

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Posted

So I have been reading a lot of posts on here over the last couple of weeks where people seem to have a lot of misconceptions about the NFL, the NFLPA, the CBA (collective bargining agreement) and the poteniel lockout year in 2011. So here are some things I think need pointed out.

1. The CBA is an agreement between the team owners and the NFLPA. Note that I did not say the NFL. The NFL is actually a non-profit organization and is suppose to be the mediator between the owners and between the owners (as a group) and the players as well as the organizing party to the way the games are played i.e. schedules, rules, officating ect.

2. The current CBA does not expire until the end of the 2010 league year. This means that the upcapped year is apart of the current CBA. Orginally, the current CBA was not suppose to expire until the end of the 2012 league year but the owners voted to enact an option they themselves put into the CBA that would end the agreement in 2011 and make the 2010 year uncapped.

3. Under the previous cap and CBA, players as a whole were paid 62% of the total revenue that the owners collectively made as the NFL. The owners want that number to be around 42%. All business models state that a business that pays out more than 60% of their revenue to salaries (which includes benefits) is in major touble of losing profitability and that the ideal % is to pay anywhere from 50% to 55% of their revenue. It's important to note two keys factors here. 1) The 62% is only what is paid to players. This does not include coaches, front office personel, stadium personel ect. and 2) the NFL (that non-profit organization) also has employees that have to be paid jointly by the owners.

4. The NFL as a group has increased revenue every year since 1993, the first year of free agency and the old CBA. Even the past couple of years when the economy has been bad, revenues have increased. Don't confuss revenues with profits. This was the main reason that the owners voted to end the current CBA. As the revenues continued to increase so did the players salaries by percentage of the total revenue. This left less and less money to pay for other expenses thus making profits less and less each passing year.

5. The owners want the players to take a smaller percentage of the revenue. They are not asking the players to take a pay cut. The best terminology to use here would be to say the owners are asking the players to take smaller percentage raises each year. This, however, is completely different than to say the owners want to cut player salaries.

6. If a new CBA isn't reached by the end of the 2010 league year (which would be March of 2011) then the NFLPA will have two options. Play the 2011 season without a CBA which would mean no salary cap, salary floor, free agency or vet minimum salary. Or by law they can lockout the season. Of course the NFLPA is not going to play without a CBA. If they get to this point, then when they choose to lockout the season, the NFLPA would under law have the right to ask it's members to strike. The owners, as employers who have signed contracts with the players, would also under law have the right to continue to operate without a CBA. If the players strike, then the players would be forfieting any money owed to them during which time they would be on strike. The owners would not owe any money to a player that otherwise would have been paid if that player was not on strike, meaning signing money, gaurenteed money roster bonuses that were scheduled to be paid would be lost.

7. The NFL, as a representative to the owners, and the networks that broadcast the games have a contract that 1) has to be paid no matter what other legal situations are occuring and 2) guarentees that games will be played in order to be broadcast. So, if the NFLPA asks their members to strike, scrubs will play the games that are on the schedule. Owners make the majority of their revenue from these contracts. Without having to pay out 62% of these contract to players, the owners will make a very large profit no matter who is on the team that is striking or what contracts are signed this year by those striking players.

So, in conclusion, if you want to believe that Jerry Richardson is having a "fire sale" to save money in 2011, this belief is unfounded. He is, however, using the rules under the last, and uncapped, year of the current CBA to clear bad contracts without penelty of the cap system. Everyone was expecting this to happen on most teams and the Panthers aren't the only ones doing it. So have the Jets and Redskins in just as big of a manner. Almost all other teams have done it as well, just to a lesser extent.

And Richardson is correct in putting the good of the league infront of his team. And he isn't the only owner doing it. Surprisingly Jerry Jones has even taken this appoarch. The difference between the two is that Jones took a higher risk by using the system to his advantage last offseason while Richardson waited until he was sure the uncapped year would happen. I mean whats the point in winning a Super Bowl this year if in 5 years the NFL is down to 6 big market teams because all of the small to mid market teams had to retract? And don't say that would never happen...almost everyone said the same thing about an uncapped season.

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Posted

The owners have to take into account the damage they may do to the league and their future wallets by putting scrubs on the field. Stadiums were almost completely empty in 80's when it last done and I think it will be that way again. Fans will remember and it could make it tough to get them all back.

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Posted

The owners have to take into account the damage they may do to the league and their future wallets by putting scrubs on the field. Stadiums were almost completely empty in 80's when it last done and I think it will be that way again. Fans will remember and it could make it tough to get them all back.

A small list of scrubs that are penciled in to start next year

1. Matt Moore: Everyone wanted this scrub during the season when the 12.5 million dollar man was throwing interceptions. You have him now

Scrub Counter = 1

2. D Will: Franchise RB

Scrub Counter = 2

3. J Stew: Franchise RB II

Scrub Counter = 3

4. Gross, Wharton, Kalil, Otah: Wow

Scrub Counter = 6

5. Steve Smith: An adequate receiver... OK, on second thought he is really pretty damn good.

Scrub Counter = 7

6. Jon Beason: Top 3 MLB in the game

Scrub Counter = 8

7. Thomas Davis: On the verge of break out season prior to injury last year

Scrub Counter = 9

8. Chris Harris: Swagger @ safety

Scrub counter = 10

9. Chris Gamble: Frustrating at times but still a nice piece of the puzzle.

Scrub Counter = 11

10. Everette Brown: Hope, which is definitely not a strategy defined the draft pick but he started making a name for himself at the end of the year.

Scrub Counter = 12

This team has a solid back bone and the on the field product will be good.

We have a glaring need to add depth (and hopefully starters) to the DL but I dont think we will be fielding scrubs next year.

It amazes me that people are being so emotional.

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Posted

A small list of scrubs that are penciled in to start next year

1. Matt Moore: Everyone wanted this scrub during the season when the 12.5 million dollar man was throwing interceptions. You have him now

Scrub Counter = 1

2. D Will: Franchise RB

Scrub Counter = 2

3. J Stew: Franchise RB II

Scrub Counter = 3

4. Gross, Wharton, Kalil, Otah: Wow

Scrub Counter = 6

5. Steve Smith: An adequate receiver... OK, on second thought he is really pretty damn good.

Scrub Counter = 7

6. Jon Beason: Top 3 MLB in the game

Scrub Counter = 8

7. Thomas Davis: On the verge of break out season prior to injury last year

Scrub Counter = 9

8. Chris Harris: Swagger @ safety

Scrub counter = 10

9. Chris Gamble: Frustrating at times but still a nice piece of the puzzle.

Scrub Counter = 11

10. Everette Brown: Hope, which is definitely not a strategy defined the draft pick but he started making a name for himself at the end of the year.

Scrub Counter = 12

This team has a solid back bone and the on the field product will be good.

We have a glaring need to add depth (and hopefully starters) to the DL but I dont think we will be fielding scrubs next year.

It amazes me that people are being so emotional.

you lack serious reading comprehension!

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Posted

I'll play in 2011.

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Posted

what i dont understand is how can the owners opt out their contract early without any punishment.antiono gates said the same thing in usa today last week.

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Posted

I'll play in 2011.

me 2.im still in football shape lol

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Posted

me 2.im still in football shape lol

I'm not, but I'll still play! lol

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Posted

what i dont understand is how can the owners opt out their contract early without any punishment.antiono gates said the same thing in usa today last week.

from what i understand it was written in the contract. cant blame them for enacting a clause in the contract.

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Posted

So guess how many years the owners knew about this?

Guess how many were loading themselves with BAD contracts ahead of this year? Whoopsie

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Posted

yeah if it was such a huge problem why did they agree to give out those big paydays. so they brought tis upon there selves.

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Posted

Well done mpf.

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