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How Fitting that in Today 1765...


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#1 Jangler

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 06:56 AM

As part of an effort to defray the burgeoning expense of running the empire, Parliament passed the Stamp Act in March 1765. The law was to become effective in the colonies on November 1 and was announced by Prime Minister George Grenville many months in advance; he expressed a willingness to substitute another revenue-raising measure if a more palatable one could be found.

The act required the use of stamped paper* for legal documents, diplomas, almanacs, broadsides, newspapers and playing cards. The presence of the stamp on these items was to be proof that the tax had been paid. Funds accumulated from this tax were to be earmarked solely for the support of British soldiers protecting the American colonies. Violators of the law were to be tried in the vice admiralty courts, a detail that would not be overlooked by its critics.

The British authorities were not trying to oppress the colonists and regarded the stamp tax as entirely reasonable; even Benjamin Franklin, then a colonial agent in London, gave his grudging acquiescence to the plan.

Despite parliamentary intentions, colonial reaction was adverse and immediate. The Sugar Act of the previous year had been a tax on trade, in effect an indirect and external tax. But in the Stamp Tax the Americans for the first time were faced with a direct, internal tax. This distinction was argued effectively in the writings of John Dickinson, one of the early leaders of the opposition to British policies. However, these arguments seemed to be incomprehensible hair-splitting to Parliament and royal officials.

The effects of the Stamp Act were to unite some of the most powerful elements of colonial society — lawyers, clergymen, journalists and businessmen. Opposition came in a variety of forms. Some was reasoned and informal, such as James Otis’ The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved, a pamphlet that proclaimed the unconstitutionality of taxation by agencies in which the colonies were not represented.

A more formal response came in the meeting of the Stamp Act Congress in October 1765, an inter-colonial effort to orchestrate opposition to the British plan.

The greatest impact, however, came through the Stamp Act riots in which violence was used to intimidate potential tax agents and public demonstrations were employed to solidify radical opposition. Shopkeepers agreed among themselves not to sell British manufactures (nonimportation agreements) and strong-arm Sons of Liberty made certain that the merchants maintained their resolve.

The general unpopularity of the Grenville program led to the failure of his government in June 1765; the Marquis of Rockingham replaced him and began the process of finding a way out of the chaos. After much debate in Parliament, the Stamp Act was repealed on March 17, 1766 due in no small part to the protests of merchants at home who felt the pinch of the nonimportation programs. The Stamp Act was repealed out of expediency, not because American arguments about taxation had been accepted in England.

As a face-savings gesture, however, Parliament approved the Declaratory Act (March 1766), which stated in part that Parliament:


had, hath, and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.

This statement of Parliamentary supremacy was wisely ignored by colonial opposition leaders, who were contented with their victory over the Stamp Act.

#2 Delhommey

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 07:20 AM

You do realize what they called anti-progressives during that war, correct? Loyalists.

#3 Panthro

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 07:21 AM

Does this mean we can bayonet Jangler?

#4 googoodan

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 07:33 AM

You do realize what they called anti-progressives during that war, correct? Loyalists.


And people who wanted to take power AWAY from governments were called liberals.
Strange world, isn't it?

#5 cookinwithgas

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 07:58 AM

As long as we are forced to publicly admit that we are all controlled by a God we are OK, right?

#6 Delhommey

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 08:43 AM

And people who wanted to take power AWAY from governments were called liberals.
Strange world, isn't it?


Not if you live in the rest of the English speaking world.

#7 googoodan

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 03:08 PM

As long as we are forced to publicly admit that we are all controlled by a God we are OK, right?


Can you highlight that in the original post please? Sometimes my vision blurs - maybe thats why I can't see anything to do with that in this thread.

#8 cookinwithgas

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 03:26 PM

no I refuse to do that sorry about your vision hope it is not a preexisting condition or you are screwed OH YEAH that's handled now

#9 ChucktownK

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 03:44 PM

Progressives are nothing like they used to be. Today's progressives have all forgotten what country they live in.

#10 rodeo

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 06:23 PM

it's our country now, if you don't like it get out.

#11 ChucktownK

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 06:50 PM

it's our country now, if you don't like it get out.


I don't leave for renters...which is what this admin is doing because they ain't gonna be there long. Oh...lest you forget...we're the crazy ones with the guns. I think I'll stay and make trouble.

#12 cookinwithgas

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 08:20 PM

On this day:

On March 21, 1965, more than 3,000 civil rights demonstrators led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. began their march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala

Thomas Jefferson took office as America's first secretary of state.

The United Nations set up temporary headquarters at Hunter College in New York City.

Armed with a new law rushed through Congress and signed by President George W. Bush, the attorney for Terri Schiavo's parents pleaded with a judge to order the brain-damaged woman's feeding tube re-inserted. (The judge later refused.)



#13 ChucktownK

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 08:36 PM

On this day March 22, 2010 I farted and decided that I would name it cookingwithgas.

#14 cookinwithgas

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 09:06 PM

At least that one is yours.

#15 ChucktownK

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 10:56 PM

Cwiggie for short. ;)


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