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Barry Bonds

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Posted

On this, we agree.

I think at the very least, every player who's been implicated ouught to have an asterisk next to their records; Bonds, A-Rod, Clemens, and everyone else included.

What about the NFL players.?..Merriman, Peppers, the 70's Steelers (and pretty much every other team from that era).......

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What about the NFL players.?..Merriman, Peppers, the 70's Steelers (and pretty much every other team from that era).......

Its different for baseball. They have a rich legacy of high character guys that the other sports dont have, and its been tarnished forever. Look at HOFers like Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, & Tris Speaker. Cobb was a bigot that attacked black people and Hornsby & Speaker were klansmen that hated jews & catholics. Putting guys like Bonds, Clemens, & A-Rod beside guys like that devalues the Hall IMO. I can say with full certainty that if guys like Cobb and Speaker were playing today, no way would they try to gain a competitive edge, they were all class. :D

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Its different for baseball. They have a rich legacy of high character guys that the other sports dont have, and its been tarnished forever. Look at HOFers like Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, & Tris Speaker. Cobb was a bigot that attacked black people and Hornsby & Speaker were klansmen that hated jews & catholics. Putting guys like Bonds, Clemens, & A-Rod beside guys like that devalues the Hall IMO.

There's a monumental difference between being a piece of poo of a person and being a cheater, KT, when it comes to professional sports.

Bonds and Clemens, alike, just happen to fit both molds

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There's a monumental difference between being a piece of sh*t of a person and being a cheater, KT, when it comes to professional sports.

Bonds and Clemens, alike, just happen to fit both molds

Dimbee research some of the guys in the Hall who've admitted to using "greenies" an illegal amphetamine that carries more jail time than illegal steroids and is currently considered a banned substance in MLB. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Mickey Mantle are just a few of the HOFers who've either admitted to using or got caught using during their playing days. Ty Cobb & Tris Speaker were not only bigots, but were banned from baseball in 1926 for throwing baseball games in 1919. Thats the same offense that got Shoeless Joe banned for life, yet they were later reinstated. This notion that "cheating" didnt start in baseball until 2000 is a joke. But hey, most people get their history of the game from ESPN and have never looked in depth at the game's troubled past or picked up a book detailing it. You'll be surprised what you might find. Nevertheless, I'll put a cool million up that Bonds, A-Rod, & Clemens are all Hall bound. Bank it!

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Dimbee research some of the guys in the Hall who've admitted to using "greenies" an illegal amphetamine that carries more jail time than illegal steroids and is currently considered a banned substance in MLB. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Mickey Mantle are just a few of the HOFers who've either admitted to using or got caught using during their playing days. Ty Cobb & Tris Speaker were not only bigots, but were banned from baseball in 1926 for throwing baseball games in 1919. Thats the same offense that got Shoeless Joe banned for life, yet they were later reinstated. This notion that "cheating" didnt start in baseball until 2000 is a joke. But hey, most people get their history of the game from ESPN and have never looked in depth at the game's troubled past or picked up a book detailing it. You'll be surprised what you might find. Nevertheless, I'll put a cool million up that Bonds, A-Rod, & Clemens are all Hall bound. Bank it!

I just wanna know where you got that sweet ass avatar... UTZ chips FTW...

I like the Chesapeake Bay Seasoned "Crab Chips"... :drool5:

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What about the NFL players.?..Merriman, Peppers, the 70's Steelers (and pretty much every other team from that era).......

I wouldn't really have a problem with it, but it's valid to say that football is nowhere near as stat driven as baseball.

If I were to ask you the name of the leading passer, rusher, sacker, tackler, etc. you might know some of them. Others, you'd float a couple names in your head and say "probably one of those guys". But baseball fans love their stats and stat leaders.

Likewise, stats aren't as big a deal when it comes to choosing hall of fame football players. They're a huge part of the baseball equation.

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I wouldn't really have a problem with it, but it's valid to say that football is nowhere near as stat driven as baseball.

If I were to ask you the name of the leading passer, rusher, sacker, tackler, etc. you might know some of them. Others, you'd float a couple names in your head and say "probably one of those guys". But baseball fans love their stats and stat leaders.

Likewise, stats aren't as big a deal when it comes to choosing hall of fame football players. They're a huge part of the baseball equation.

Won't get an argument from me, I figured that was going to be your response. ;)

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The Barry Bonds perjury trial has just been sent into the justice system equivalent of an indefinite rain delay.

Federal prosecutors on Friday notified a judge that they will appeal a crucial order barring the use of perhaps their strongest evidence against baseball's home run king, effectively putting next week's scheduled trial on hold for what is expected to be at least several months. While Bonds' lawyers plan to fight the delay, a visibly frustrated U.S. District Judge Susan Illston conceded at a hearing earlier Friday that it appeared "automatic'' that a government appeal would force her to postpone the trial.

Bonds' lawyers immediately asked Illston to reject the request to delay the trial.

The case is now headed to the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which will consider the government's argument that Illston improperly excluded key evidence, including three positive steroids tests that prosecutors allege came from Bonds in 2000 and 2001. Bonds faces 10 counts of perjury and one count of obstructing justice for allegedly lying to a federal grand jury in December 2003 about using steroids as he chased baseball's home run records.

Prosecutors are in their current predicament because the linchpin of their case, Bonds' personal trainer Greg Anderson, has steadfastly refused to testify. Anderson appeared in court again Friday and reiterated that he will not testify during the trial, prompting Illston to warn that he must appear next Wednesday and will be jailed for the duration of the trial for contempt if he remains silent.

For now, the Anderson drama will be delayed as well while the government's appeal unfolds. Legal experts overwhelmingly agree that it will be difficult for prosecutors to prevail in the appeals courts, which are ordinarily reluctant to tamper with a trial judge's pretrial rulings on evidentiary issues. Illston excluded the steroids tests and doping calendars from Balco linked to Anderson and Bonds because, without Anderson's account, there is no direct evidence tying the material to Bonds, rendering it hearsay.

http://www.mercurynews.com/sharks/ci_11800545

Bonds continues to make the Government look like dumbasses. After 5 years of investigation now they're begging for a delay to the trial and more time to corroborate their lies. Maybe the Feds can use the book Game Of Shadows since its been taken as pure fact with "overwhelming evidence" Bonds used steroids. :smilielol5: The lengths we'll go to to destroy a rich black man who hits baseballs for a living. LOL.

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Update: Barry Bonds has not reported for Spring Training. To ANY team.

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p1.barry-bonds.ap.jpg

As he has done with countless pitchers over the last quarter-century, Barry Bonds made the Justice Department sweat, cower and blink. Faced with entering a court of law with a losing hand, the US Attorney's office in San Francisco has delayed the case of The US v. Barry Bonds indefinitely. Efforts to prove that the home-run king lied in grand jury testimony about his anabolic intake have for now been benched.

The prosecution will now start a lengthy appeal of Judge Susan Ilston's devastating pretrial dismissal of most of their case. It had wanted to submit reams of evidence seized from Bonds's trainer Greg Anderson, without having Anderson testify to its authenticity. Ilston refused to let them. This left the prosecution with nothing but scatological testimony from Bonds's ex-mistress that dwelled more on testicles than test results, so they chose to retreat and regroup.

The Justice Department wins 95 percent of the cases it brings to trial, and make no mistake: this case was about to become part of the other 5 percent. The only thing the Justice Department had in its favor is what it always has, unlimited time and funds, so it's rolling the dice in hopes that a three-judge panel rules against Ilston. It wants the wiretaps, the illegal search and seizures and the acts of intimidation against Anderson's family all to stand legally. This is frightening, but prosecutors will likely find themselves very disappointed. The page appears to be turning on the entire Bush era of outlaw justice, and Barry Bonds will likely benefit.

The case started when Attorney General John Ashcroft, the great champion of the Patriot Act, held a press conference in 2004 to announce that the investigation of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative was officially underway. Having the Attorney General convene a grand jury to look into steroid use was extreme overkill, but as commentators remarked at the time, it was a shot across the bow at Bonds. Most sports fans were very comfortable with seeing the despoiler of the national pastime get crushed. Bonds has had notoriously difficult relationships with the press, fans, teammates and management throughout his career. He is also black, which makes him an easier target. But the desire to see Bonds punished came at a terrible collective cost.

The Bonds case has always been about more than the sports media have chosen to dwell on. It's not about the scourge of anabolic steroids, or a surly, arrogant athlete getting his comeuppance. It isn't even about perjury. It's about how the Justice Department under Bush became untethered from the Bill of Rights.

This week, Obama Attorney General Eric Holder has released a series of post-9/11 memos that chill the spine. As the Washington Post reported:

Justice Department appointee John Yoo argued that constitutional provisions ensuring free speech and barring warrantless searches could be disregarded by the president in wartime, allowing troops to storm a building if they suspected terrorists might be inside. In another, the department asserted that detainees could be transferred to countries known to commit human rights abuses so long as US officials did not intentionally seek their torture.

And as Michael Isikoff wrote in Newsweek:

In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, the Justice Department secretly gave the green light for the US military to attack apartment buildings and office complexes inside the United States, deploy high-tech surveillance against US citizens and potentially suspend First Amendment freedom-of-the-press rights in order to combat the terror threat, according to a memo released Monday.

Bonds has been the most public victim of this frightening approach to law and justice. But while Americans followed the Bonds saga, and many cheered his professional demise, the real damage to civil liberties was being done. Shamefully underreported throughout the last decade were the stories of hundreds of Arabs and Muslims imprisoned and harassed through the Patriot Act, or the persecution of Sami Al Arian, or the hundreds of Maryland activists, who were spied upon for being environmentalists or anti-death penalty. They were all caught in the same net.

It is a very good thing that Holder is releasing these memos. But it's not enough. Repealing the Patriot Act is the best way to truly turn the page on a shameful era in the history of US law.

Still, the ruling of Judge Ilston and the backstepping of the San Francisco US Attorney's office is a good start. If they want to prove Bonds perjured himself, let's see if they can do it without torching the Bill of Rights in the process.

http://www.thenation.com/doc/20090316/zirin

If our Government ever wants to take away the freedoms of the American people, all they need to do is put a black face on the issue and they'll gladly relinquish them.

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Posted

When you lie to the Feds, eventually this happens:

1103839685_7259.jpg

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Posted

Bonds didnt lie. The Feds have no case. And it didnt take them 6-8 years to prosecute Martha Stewart.

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