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Coaches to never win a Super Bowl; Cowher's 1


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#37 rayzor

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:30 AM

mi·cro·man·age

–verb (used with object), -aged, -ag·ing.
to manage or control with excessive attention to minor details.

So you don't want a coach that pays attention to detail. Do you realize that the smallest thing can differentiate between a Touchdown and a Turnover? A good coach who is a micro-manager knows how to create mismatches, which then gives their team the upper hand.

Not to be rude but that requirement sucks. We already have coaches who don't pay attention to details or make half-time adjustments, we don't need another lame duck coach. Get someone in here that wants to work hard!

key words.....EXCESSIVE attention to MINOR details. halftime adjustments isn't a minor detail.

ftr, what we have had is a micromanager. plays all run through him has to be done exactly the way he sees it should. a macromanager, on the other hand, hires the best OC and DC and lets them do their job. head coach is the big picture guy. he lets his assistants work out the details and trusts them to get the job done. he tells his subordinates what he wants done...changes that need to be made...and lets them figure it out.

they do the same thing and expect the same thing with their players.

micromanager = control freak.

only thing that sucked was your understanding of a micromanager.

here's description of a micromanager from wiki thats just as good as any you would find in business management text book (and yes, i know some of it was already posted)....

In business management, micromanagement is a management style where a manager closely observes or controls the work of his or her subordinates or employees. Micromanagement generally has a negative connotation.[1][2]

Symptoms

Rather than giving general instructions on smaller tasks and then devoting his time to supervising larger concerns, the micromanager monitors and assesses every step of a business process and avoids delegation of decisions.[6] Micromanagers are usually irritated when a subordinate makes decisions without consulting them, even if the decisions are totally within the subordinate's level of authority.

Micromanagement also frequently involves requests for unnecessary and overly detailed reports ("reportomania"). A micromanager tends to require constant and detailed performance feedback and tends to be excessively focused on procedural trivia (often in detail greater than he can actually process) rather than on overall performance, quality and results. This focus on "low-level" trivia often delays decisions, clouds overall goals and objectives, restricts the flow of information between employees, and guides the various aspects of a project in different and often opposed directions. Many micromanagers accept such inefficiencies because those micromanagers consider the outcome of a project less important than their retention of control or of the appearance of control.

The most extreme cases of micromanagement constitute a management pathology closely related to, e.g., workplace bullying and narcissistic behavior. Micromanagement resembles addiction in that although most micromanagers are behaviorally dependent on control over others, both as a lifestyle and as a means of maintaining that lifestyle, many of them fail to recognize and acknowledge their dependence even when everyone around them observes it.[1] Some severe cases of micromanagement arise from other underlying mental-health conditions such as obsessive–compulsive personality disorder, although not all allegations of such conditions by subordinates and other "armchair psychologists" are accurate.

Although micromanagement is often easily recognized by employees, micromanagers rarely view themselves as such. In a form of denial similar to that found in addictive behavior, micromanagers will often rebut allegations of micromanagement by offering a competing characterization of their management style, e.g., as "structured" or "organized." Further, they tend to fancy themselves as "perfectionists".



#38 pantherclaw

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:46 AM

Is there anywhere that the control Bill Cowher will demand to be a head coach in the NFL is documented or is the whole power thing completely speculative?


Nope, I just make poo up to annoy you.

(Rolls my eyes)

This is pretty common info.

I'm also not going to bother finding a link while I post on my phone, just cause you haven't paid enough attention to have known this info.

I'd like to be wrong on this...as I believe no single person should have that much control.

#39 Kevin Greene

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:57 AM

Annoying yes. But no problem, I'll wait until you're in front of a computer where you can post up a quote where Cowher lays out the requirements of his accepting a Head Coaching job.
Thanks in advance by the way.

#40 SgtJoo

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:58 AM

Is there anywhere that the control Bill Cowher will demand to be a head coach in the NFL is documented or is the whole power thing completely speculative?


http://tinyurl.com/38ftqse

#41 frash.exe

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 01:59 AM

Is there anywhere that the control Bill Cowher will demand to be a head coach in the NFL is documented or is the whole power thing completely speculative?


there are conflicting reports out there over the years

the whole issue I have with Cowher is in divided into these parts:

1) He's already won a superbowl. In my mind, the most motivated prospective HC is one that has never gotten there.

2) The past few years it seems like he is in no hurry to come back to coach, owing to the whole motivation thing. It seems like he's more interested in going in the best possible environment he can think of rather than trying to re-establish himself, and if he was truly motivated, he probably wouldn't still be on the free agent coach list.

3) He hasn't operated as a coach in organized football for 4 years and counting, and the complexion of the league has changed a lot in that span.

#42 Kevin Greene

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 02:03 AM

http://tinyurl.com/38ftqse



Thanks, but could you just link to the Cowher quote?

#43 Kevin Greene

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 02:11 AM

there are conflicting reports out there over the years

the whole issue I have with Cowher is in divided into these parts:

1) He's already won a superbowl. In my mind, the most motivated prospective HC is one that has never gotten there.

2) The past few years it seems like he is in no hurry to come back to coach, owing to the whole motivation thing. It seems like he's more interested in going in the best possible environment he can think of rather than trying to re-establish himself, and if he was truly motivated, he probably wouldn't still be on the free agent coach list.

3) He hasn't operated as a coach in organized football for 4 years and counting, and the complexion of the league has changed a lot in that span.


All valid concerns. And no one knows what will make him come back to football. To suggest otherwise is arrogant. I also don't think Cowher is the Panther's only viable option. Harbaugh might be even a better choice.
However, with the passing of his wife and his daughters growing up this may be the time he is ready to fully emerge himslef again into football.
Only time will tell.

#44 Cavscout

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 07:09 AM

"I'm very comfortable at CBS. I'll keep all my options open. And I'll only answer those questions at the end of the season. I'm not going to comment on any hypothetical situations until the entire season is over."---Bill Cowher

Entire season would be after the superbowl. He wants to go to a winning team. We should already have a coach by then, IMO.

#45 theyhateme45

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 10:10 AM

I aqree with that we all hope to win another game.

This thread is meant to factually address those people who feel Cowher should not be coach here because quote 'it took him 10 years to win one'.

I want Cowher as coach so that the Panthers can do more than win another game. I want a proven winner. I think he's the right man for the job, so I am prejudiced. I just find people who use the time it took him to win a SuperBowl to not represent the facts in the NFL as related to coaching.


Blah...... If it wasn't for that Kasey Kickoff Fox could easily be a superbowl coach with a ring.... would that have made him better than every coach without one??? Nope. Superbowl rings are a combo of Coach, Quarterback, Players, Health, and luck..... There are great coaches who don't win rings, and bad ones who do.

Point is you can;t use superbowl rings to determine the best coaching candidate. Hel Mike Shanahan has 2 Superbowl Rings!!!!! How's that working out for Washington??? LOL!!!

#46 cookinbrak

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 10:23 AM

Blah...... If it wasn't for that Kasey Kickoff Fox could easily be a superbowl coach with a ring...


So effing tired of blaming Kasey. New England was passing at will at this point of the game, so 15-20 yards more would have been no problem. You wanna blame somebody, blame the defense for not stopping them from getting into FG range. A 77 yard FG didn't beat us.

#47 cookinbrak

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 10:28 AM

George Seifert is on that list of super bowl winning coaches. He will go down as one of the the worst coaches in Panther history. We don't need a proven winner. We need someone who can win in the future.


Seifert cut a bunch of players and went 1-15 doing it "his way"....didn't work out....

Several years later, somebody else cut a bunch of players.....we're 1-?? now....who goes down as the worst _______ this year?