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What were you taught about American involvement in the ww2 european front?

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Posted · Report post

Um, no.

i was recommended a book called the grand delusion that kinda supported this that theory. I never read it though.

I mean the Russians hadn't amassed all their troops on the western front for no reason.

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Posted · Report post

Sure, but that is sorta what you do as you watch a dictator gobble up pretty much all of Western Europe.

But to say they had all their troops on the Western frontier is also misleading.

Stalin's peeps in the West were woefully unprepared, and the Great terror didn't help leadership either. The defensive positions were hastily abandoned in order to not be provocative, and even glaringly obvious signs of German intentions were let slide by Stalin in order to remain faithful to the pact Ribbentrop and Molotov signed.

Shoot, Joe was sending supplies to Germany the day before the invasion, as his Generals freaked out telling him this stuff was going to be the very stuff to kill Russians any day.

Hell, Mein Kampf spelled it all out for anybody, and Stalin had read all about Leibensraum, from all I've read he was just psychologically unprepared to deal with the menace until a few years later, when the Russian war machine could have dealt with it.

Stalin's psychology leading up to the invasion is quite fascinating, and his actions and quotes speak to the level of mixed feelings and disarray at the time.

I'm currently reading The Greatest Battle by Andrew Nagorski, a really nice summary of Barbarossa from the Russian perspective with the focus being primarily on the seige of Moscow. He gives great insight and sources from those close to Joe, as well as access to recently unclassified stuff.

Very well done, and I think it along with most of the non crackpot stuff I've read pretty much puts to bed the concept of an imminent Russian attack on German holdings.

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Posted · Report post

cool, thanks man.

do you happen to know the name of that norse sniper the russians were horrified by that basically traveled around on skis laying waste to the invading forces? the little midget who didn't use a scope because he thought it was unsportsmanlike?

rumor has it that when the russians thought he was in an area they'd order an artillery strike lol

th

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Posted · Report post

cool, thanks man.

do you happen to know the name of that norse sniper the russians were horrified by that basically traveled around on skis laying waste to the invading forces? the little midget who didn't use a scope because he thought it was unsportsmanlike?

rumor has it that when the russians thought he was in an area they'd order an artillery strike lol

th

jumping in here.. Simo Hayha

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4

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Posted · Report post

Wow, never heard of that guy.

Without a scope, that is pretty damn amazing.

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Posted · Report post

Simo Hayha, white death.

best ever

The Winter War is a fascinating read and another (pre) WWII backwater not often tread by those that read about D- Day only.

The Finns were some magnificent bastards.

Edit: Time Life has an excellent synopsis of the campaigns in Scandinavia, and they do a good job of explaining the reasons for interest in the area by the major combatants.

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