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Pelosi and the 500 million americans...


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#31 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 03:27 PM

All I've seen in the recent past is Democrats presenting their ideas, Republicans saying "those ideas won't work", and I'm still waiting on some constructive criticism to come from the Republican camp but all we get is blatant criticism and nothing more.

Seems to me they spend their time trying to counter every effort instead of spending it trying to improve those efforts.

Correct me if I am wrong...


Define recent.

IMO, historically speaking the party out of power (the democrats for the first 6 years of the Bush admin, or the republicans first 2-4 years of the Clinton admin) is the one that comes up with "new" ideas which are really not new just revamped old ones.

Nothing Obama has come up with is really new or innovative so far. That doesn't mean that he is doing a bad job, but there really is nothing new under the sun.

Its not his ideas but his ability to get the things that he wants accomplished that will make or break him as an effective leader. In other words, how good a politician he is. Well that and how he handles the crises that will pop up.

Edited by Davidson Deac II, 04 February 2009 - 03:31 PM.


#32 LiQuiD

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 03:28 PM

It's the attack Cheney was alluding to :) He's in the jewelry business now

#33 LiQuiD

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 03:36 PM

Recent meaning since inauguration. All I'm asking for is a Republican to, when he/she states that an idea is retarded, follow up with a way to make it better. That's something that interviews with Republicans have been lacking, and it's not too much to ask.

I realize it's much too early for anything really innovative, but it's never too early to be constructive in criticism. Personally, I'm quite sick of the spiteful undermining of efforts of both parties by both parties.

I think now, as much or more than at any other time, is a time for cooperation from both sides.

#34 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 03:44 PM

Recent meaning since inauguration. All I'm asking for is a Republican to, when he/she states that an idea is retarded, follow up with a way to make it better. That's something that interviews with Republicans have been lacking, and it's not too much to ask.

I realize it's much too early for anything really innovative, but it's never too early to be constructive in criticism. Personally, I'm quite sick of the spiteful undermining of efforts of both parties by both parties.

I think now, as much or more than at any other time, is a time for cooperation from both sides.


I commend Obama for going out of his way to include Republicans in his admin, and in his plans even though he really doesn't need to.

But I don't think you will see that much cooperation. And I don't think its really needed. The Democrats are the majority party, and they have very few restrictions on what they can and can't do. If the republicans are to regain power (the whitehouse) it will be because Obama's policies failed and they are seen as a standing up against those policies.

#35 LiQuiD

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 03:56 PM

Well I, for one, would like to see cooperation on things to better the situation our country is in, not to further one or the other political party.

I guess it's a dream world I live in, but the snozberries taste like snozberries :)

#36 Matt Foley

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:11 PM

Well I, for one, would like to see cooperation on things to better the situation our country is in, not to further one or the other political party.

I guess it's a dream world I live in, but the snozberries taste like snozberries :)


Who ever heard of a snozberry?

#37 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:13 PM

I think all congressmen should speak their opinion, regardless of party affiliation. I think its ok to be against something, if its really how you feel. I don't agree with voting the party line regardless of personal beliefs. I don't believe that all republicans in the house were against the stimulus no more than I believe all but 12 democrats supported.

In other words, cooperation is less important to me than doing what one believes is the right thing.

Thats true imo when one is a congressman. On the other hand, when one is president, or even a house or senate leader, the ability to compromise becomes more important.

Edited by Davidson Deac II, 04 February 2009 - 04:20 PM.


#38 Panthers_Lover

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:20 PM

All I've seen in the recent past is Democrats presenting their ideas, Republicans saying "those ideas won't work", and I'm still waiting on some constructive criticism to come from the Republican camp but all we get is blatant criticism and nothing more.

Seems to me they spend their time trying to counter every effort instead of spending it trying to improve those efforts.

Correct me if I am wrong...


Someone Republicans are making constructive criticisms and suggestions. Sen. Jim DeMint (R-SC):

Fortunately, there is another way. A better way. A way that will actually stimulate the economy, spur investment, and create jobs. A way that will perma*nently keep billions of dollars--immediately--in the private sector: in the hands of Americans who buy goods, provide services, start businesses, and hire employees.

Call it "The American Option." It is not innova*tive or particularly clever. In fact, it's only 11 pages. But it will work. And it is based on proven American principles of freedom and the opportunity to suc*ceed. The plan--developed by scholars J. D. Foster and William Beach here at The Heritage Founda*tion--is the best anyone has proposed since the recession first took hold. I have adopted the plan and will offer it on the Senate floor next week as a substitute.

The idea is simple: first, make the temporary tax cuts of 2001 and 2003--now set to expire in 2011--permanent. Short-term tax relief, of the sort envisioned by the Democrats' plan does not stimu*late economic growth.

It's the difference between a $1,000 gift one month, which you might put away or use to pay off some credit card debt, and a $1,000-a-month raise, which might get you thinking about buying a house or a new car or taking a summer vacation or starting a new business.

To encourage people to take risks and create new jobs, we must make tax relief for families and small businesses permanent. Recessions are caused by uncertainty that keeps investors on the sidelines. By making low taxes permanent, plans and decisions can be made with an eye toward the future.

With the 2011 tax-bomb defused, our plan will cut income tax rates across the board compared to current law. The top marginal rate--the one paid by most of the small businesses that create new jobs-- will fall from 35 percent to 25 percent. It simplifies the code to include only two other brackets, 15 and 10 percent.

These marginal rate reductions would be perma*nent and give the private sector maximum predict*ability as it decides how to best spend its recovered income. This is a matter of fairness. No American family should be forced to pay the federal govern*ment more than 25 percent of the fruits of their hard labor.

Just as we cut taxes for families and small busi*nesses, we need to cut them for corporations as well, from 35 percent to 25 percent. And we shouldn't be afraid to say so. Our corporate tax rate is one of the highest in the world, driving invest*ment and jobs overseas. Lowering this key rate will unlock trillions of dollars to be invested in America instead of abroad.

And rather than giving large companies loop*holes and targeted tax benefits--which only encourage them to spend money on the lobbyists who secure such goodies--Congress should get out of the business of picking winners and losers in the market and simply cut everyone's taxes and let the best company win. My plan will make businesses compete for consumers, not Congressmen.

To further simplify and improve the code, our plan would also:

* permanently repeal the alternative minimum tax once and for all;
* permanently maintain the capital gains and divi*dends taxes at 15 percent;
* permanently kill the Death Tax for estates under $5 million, and cut the tax rate to 15 percent for those above;
* permanently extend the $1,000-per-child tax credit;
* permanently repeal the marriage tax penalty;
* permanently limit itemized deductions to home mortgage interest and charitable contributions.

The Heritage Center for Data Analysis widely respected economic forecasting model projects this plan would create nearly 500,000 jobs this year, 1.3 million next year, 7.5 million by 2013, and a total of nearly 18 million jobs over the next decade.

The Democrats are forced to rely on hope to save or create just 3 million jobs as a result of their plan. When pressed, they refuse to stand behind these numbers. But with our plan--the American Option--long-term, broad-based tax cuts will spur the American economy to create 7.5 million jobs in five years and nearly 18 million jobs in just ten years. That is an average of over 2 million new jobs a year.

Instead of taking a trillion dollars out of the economy so politicians can spread it around to spe*cial interests, the American Option will keep a tril*lion more dollars in the hands of American workers and businesses. Instead of growing government, where waste and corruption run rampant, we grow the private sector, where innovation flourishes. Instead of giving the power and control of our econ*omy to politicians and bureaucrats, we give Ameri*cans and small businesses the freedom to spend and invest their own money.


http://www.heritage....nomy/hl1108.cfm

#39 cookinwithgas

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:45 PM

Yes, tax cuts for the rich. Always a good idea. As are corporate junkets for the rich. bonus packages for the rich....

#40 LiQuiD

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:49 PM

Thanks PL. I stand corrected. There is *one* Republican trying to improve on the Democrat ideas. Sounds like a lovely plan.

#41 Panthers_Lover

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:50 PM

Yes, tax cuts for the rich. Always a good idea. As are corporate junkets for the rich. bonus packages for the rich....


Didn't see any of that ....

The point, too, was that someone is making suggestions, rather than simply criticizing. Didn't say you have to agree with them ... or that I agree with all of them.

#42 cookinwithgas

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:54 PM

I guess, if making the same suggestions that got us into massive deficit spending the first time around make sense.

#43 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:58 PM

Nationalize Fedex, UPS etc... and triple the price of a stamp. :)

#44 Panthers_Lover

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:58 PM

I guess, if making the same suggestions that got us into massive deficit spending the first time around make sense.


Tell me why you think throwing $900 BILLION at it is going to help ....

#45 natty

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 05:40 PM

Nationalize Fedex, UPS etc... and triple the price of a stamp. :)


And kill e-commerce when overnight shipping takes 2 weeks. :)


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