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Need a Vet QB for a one year lease

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Posted

The coaching staff once again has Rivera..Chud...who mind you come from San Diego who's head coach was Norv Turner who praises the WCO to all. And what playbook do you keep talking about...once again. JR and MH don't called the plays the coaches do. And to have a vet that knows the system well and teach others is a plus. New Coach...New Ideas...aint that how its suppose to work if not why not have kept Fox.

do what? where in the world are you getting that from?

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little education about the coryell offense for ya....

Coryell offense is the name given to the scheme and philosophy developed by former San Diego Chargers Coach, Don Coryell. Air Coryell was initially a nickname given to the offense of the San Diego Chargers under Coryell from 1978–1986, but now has come be used interchangeably with the term Coryell offense or the less common vertical offense as a descriptive term for the offensive philosophy Coryell developed.

With Dan Fouts as quarterback, San Diego Chargers' offense was among the greatest passing offenses in NFL history. The Chargers led the league in passing yards an NFL record 6 consecutive years from 1978-1983 [1] and again in 1985. They also led the league in total yards in offense 1980-1983 and 1985. Fouts, Charlie Joiner, and Kellen Winslow would all be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame from those Charger teams.

Coryell opens up passing in the NFL

Coryell set the league on its ear with his passing offenses after moving up from the college ranks. He won two consecutive division titles (1974, 1975) with the Cardinals and three straight division titles (1979, 1980, 1981) with the Chargers, reaching the playoffs four consecutive times with the latter team. Coryell is the first coach ever to win more than 100 games at both the collegiate and professional level. Coryell's offensive innovations changed the entire nature of the league from a run-first league to a pass-first one.

Today most NFL offenses' passing games are at least partially based on Coryell conventions.

Former coach of the St. Louis Rams, Mike Martz, says "Don is the father of the modern passing game. People talk about the West Coast offense, but Don started the 'West Coast' decades ago and kept updating it. You look around the NFL now, and so many teams are running a version of the Coryell offense. Coaches have added their own touches, but it's still Coryell's offense. He has disciples all over the league. He changed the game."

and now a little education about norv turner and the coryell...

Norv Turner, current San Diego Chargers head coach and former offensive coordinator with the Dallas Cowboys, also implements a version of the Coryell style of offense. The Turner strain of Coryell offenses are still very reliant of a good receiving TE. Norv Turner strains sometimes feature an 'F-Back' (formerly known as an 'H-Back' in the 1980s), a hybrid tight end/wide receiver/fullback/running back. An F-Back is a multi-purpose, unpredictable tool for the offense. On any play he may carry the ball, lead block or pass block, play as a wide receiver, or run a tight end route. He is also part decoy, as his unpredictable role forces defenses to keep an eye on him, thereby opening up other opportunities for the offense.

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Current disciples of the Coryell offense

Today the most famous and successful advocates of this system are Norv Turner, , and .

Norv Turner learned the offense from longtime Coryell assistant, . Turner's take on the Coryell system turned around the career of Hall of Fame QB Troy Aikman and has proven to be very successful with talented high draft picks struggling with the complexities of the NFL, such as . Turner' variant is not the most robust flavor of Coryell offense. It is a very sound, QB friendly scheme that favors taking controlled chances, like quicker midrange post passes to WRs off play action rather than slower developing passes that leave QBs exposed. It is almost exclusively run out of the pro set. Turner favors a more limited palette of plays than Coryell and most other Coryell disciples, instead insisting on precise execution. His offenses are usually towards the top of the league standings, but are often labeled predictable. His offenses tend to include a strong running game, a #1 WR who can stretch the field and catch jump balls in the end-zone, a good receiving TE to attack the space the WRs create in the middle of the field and a FB who fills the role of a lead blocker and a final option as an outlet receiver. In Dallas, Turner made RB Emmitt Smith & WR Hall of Famers, and TE a five time pro bowler. As head coach of the San Diego Chargers, Turner's system helped quarterback Philip Rivers set new franchise records for single-season quarterback rating and touchdown passes in 2008.

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Coryell advocates

Coryell's direct development of future coaches included Super Bowl head coaches and , Super Bowl offensive coordinators and , as well as and . Adding to the Coryell coaching tree, Super Bowl offensive coordinator tutored under Zampese, and another Super Bowl offensive coordinator studied under both Zampese and later Turner . coached under Gibbs. ' offensive coordinator has spent most of his pro career coaching a variation of Turner's offense. Before taking the offensive coordinator job with the in 2006, served four years as with the under Cameron who was offensive coordinator at the time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coryell_offense

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Posted

now this thread is worth reading.

....and your welcome.

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Posted

now this thread is worth reading.

....and your welcome.

excuse me for my manners...

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Posted

As noted above the WCO offense can be morphed into many things but the general rules are short timing passes, yards after the catch and the short passes largely replace the running game.

The Coryell offense uses more of a running attack and play action off the run to set up the pass. Routes are usually medium to deep and dump downs to receivers are what happens when no one else is open whereas in the WCO they are a primary staple of the passing game.

A QB in air coryell has to have a strong and accurate arm, good touch in the 10-20 yard range and be able to pass the ball on third down with onsistency to move the chains.

The offenses are not similar in philosophy.

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Norv Turner strains sometimes feature an 'F-Back' (formerly known as an 'H-Back' in the 1980s), a hybrid tight end/wide receiver/fullback/running back. An F-Back is a multi-purpose, unpredictable tool for the offense. On any play he may carry the ball, lead block or pass block, play as a wide receiver, or run a tight end route. He is also part decoy, as his unpredictable role forces defenses to keep an eye on him, thereby opening up other opportunities for the offense.

Anybody know what Nick Goings is doing these days? ;)

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Posted

Anybody know what Nick Goings is doing these days? ;)
with all the concussions he got i'm not sure he would even know.
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Posted

Take a look at the "Coaching Connections" thread and you'll see what Rivera alluded to on the radio. Our entire offensive staff so far is made up of guys with Coryell experience.

In the course of their careers, Chudzinski, Shula and Hoener have all worked directly with Norv Turner. Three other coaches - Matsko, Brown, Proehl - worked directly with Norv's mentor, Ernie Zampese. The only guy without a direct connection to one of those two is Graves, and even he had previously worked for Chudzinski (who worked for Turner).

Even DB Coach Ron Meeks has worked with Turner. Heck, we've even got Turner's son Scott on staff as an offensive QC. And then of course, there's the guy that spent the last four years under Turner, that being Head Coach Ron Rivera.

Looking at all that, is there really any reason whatsoever to doubt that we'll be running a Coryell offense?

The West Coast Offense isn't coming here. And if the offense isn't coming, then WCO quarterbacks don't need to be here either.

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Posted

matt moore will be starter from day 1

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Take a look at the "Coaching Connections" thread and you'll see what Rivera alluded to on the radio. Our entire offensive staff so far is made up of guys with Coryell experience.

In the course of their careers, Chudzinski, Shula and Hoener have all worked directly with Norv Turner. Three other coaches - Matsko, Brown, Proehl - worked directly with Norv's mentor, Ernie Zampese. The only guy without a direct connection to one of those two is Graves, and even he had previously worked for Chudzinski (who worked for Turner).

Even DB Coach Ron Meeks has worked with Turner. Heck, we've even got Turner's son Scott on staff as an offensive QC. And then of course, there's the guy that spent the last four years under Turner, that being Head Coach Ron Rivera.

Looking at all that, is there really any reason whatsoever to doubt that we'll be running a Coryell offense?

The West Coast Offense isn't coming here. And if the offense isn't coming, then WCO quarterbacks don't need to be here either.

I have been paying very close attention to these hires as well. It looks like we are going to try to run an O very much like Norv's in SD, but with an attacking D.

To be honest, I am stoked. Now we just need a QB, and a TE to make it all work.

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Posted

matt moore will be starter from day 1

Damn it don't try and take my thunder. I'm the only one that can say that. We can't have more than one person saying "I told you so" at the beginning of next year.

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Posted

I'm nowhere near ready to suggest Moore will be the starter.

I am, however, increasingly convinced that he will get to come to training camp and compete.

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