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PETA says Pig Farmers are more of a threat than Bin Laden


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#1 venom

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 05:44 PM

...as far as the "well being" of americans go. According to PETA spokesperson Matthew Prescott, the meat industry is worse on our ''global warming" situation than all other transportation devices in the world combined. so in essence, if you are an environmentalist, you must be vegan. Saw it on the Glenn Beck show not too long ago. Thought it deserved a laugh...

#2 rodeo

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 05:49 PM

the second point is valid. more methane comes from cattle farms than any other source.

their hyperbolic language and childishness takes so much from any point they raise.

#3 Speed

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 07:56 PM

Oh that reminds me. I got a shoulder in the freexer. Bleev I'll cook that up this weekend.

#4 Fiz

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 08:01 PM

seriously though, especially in nc, the pork industry is pretty revolting and probably does more direct, immediately observable damage to the environment.

don't read this unless you have a strong stomach.

http://www.rollingst...worst_polluters

The drugs Smithfield administers to its pigs, of course, exit its hog houses in pig sh*t. Industrial pig waste also contains a host of other toxic substances: ammonia, methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, cyanide, phosphorous, nitrates and heavy metals. In addition, the waste nurses more than 100 microbial pathogens that can cause illness in humans, including salmonella, cryptosporidium, streptocolli and girardia. Each gram of hog sh*t can contain as much as 100 million fecal coliform bacteria.

Smithfield's holding ponds -- the company calls them lagoons -- cover as much as 120,000 square feet. The area around a single slaughterhouse can contain hundreds of lagoons, some of which run thirty feet deep. The liquid in them is not brown. The interactions between the bacteria and blood and afterbirths and stillborn piglets and urine and excrement and chemicals and drugs turn the lagoons pink.

Even light rains can cause lagoons to overflow; major floods have transformed entire counties into pig-sh*t bayous. To alleviate swelling lagoons, workers sometimes pump the sh*t out of them and spray the waste on surrounding fields, which results in what the industry daintily refers to as "overapplication." This can turn hundreds of acres -- thousands of football fields -- into shallow mud puddles of pig sh*t. Tree branches drip with pig sh*t.

The lagoons themselves are so viscous and venomous that if someone falls in it is foolish to try to save him. A few years ago, a truck driver in Oklahoma was transferring pig sh*t to a lagoon when he and his truck went over the side. It took almost three weeks to recover his body. In 1992, when a worker making repairs to a lagoon in Minnesota began to choke to death on the fumes, another worker dived in after him, and they died the same death. In another instance, a worker who was repairing a lagoon in Michigan was overcome by the fumes and fell in. His fifteen-year-old nephew dived in to save him but was overcome, the worker's cousin went in to save the teenager but was overcome, the worker's older brother dived in to save them but was overcome, and then the worker's father dived in. They all died in pig sh*t.



#5 Kurb

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 08:53 PM

Fiz, not exactly.

Rolling Stone knows about as much about NC swine operations as I do about quantum physics.

#6 Mr. Scot

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:05 PM

What have they got against Jordan Carstens? :mad:

#7 Fiz

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:55 PM

Fiz, not exactly.

Rolling Stone knows about as much about NC swine operations as I do about quantum physics.


kindly point out specific problems you have with the article

#8 Kurb

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 10:27 PM

kindly point out specific problems you have with the article



Understand I have worked in this industry for 5 years for the NCDENR in both a regulator and technical assistance fashion. SO while you might have me on other issues, that one article from Rolling Stone isn't going to cut it with me.

#9 Fiz

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 12:01 AM

kindly point out specific problems you have with the article


...

#10 JeramiahCopperfield

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:29 AM

Probably true. Have a much much greater chance of getting dangerous worms from pork then getting capped by the CIA created Al Qaeda.



#11 Delhommey

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 09:36 AM

This statement is especially true for pigs.

#12 catfang

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:09 AM

kindly point out specific problems you have with the article

The lagoons themselves are so viscous and venomous that if someone falls in it is foolish to try to save him. A few years ago, a truck driver in Oklahoma was transferring pig sh*t to a lagoon when he and his truck went over the side. It took almost three weeks to recover his body. In 1992, when a worker making repairs to a lagoon in Minnesota began to choke to death on the fumes, another worker dived in after him, and they died the same death. In another instance, a worker who was repairing a lagoon in Michigan was overcome by the fumes and fell in. His fifteen-year-old nephew dived in to save him but was overcome, the worker's cousin went in to save the teenager but was overcome, the worker's older brother dived in to save them but was overcome, and then the worker's father dived in. They all died in pig sh*t.


The same could be said about any operation taking place in a containment area where oxygen is displaced. Chemical plants. Water treatment plants. Trained personnel know not to enter these areas as they are confined spaces and anyone worth a poo knows you need training and a permit to do so. Tragedies like the article quoted happen all the time unfortunately. I once toured a grain elevator in Illinois. Owner told me a story how a silo had exploded and they were cleaning out the spoiled corn. Guy went down into the silo to remove a blockage and was overcome by lack of oxygen. Fire department came to rescue him. He got out. While down in the corn, the fire chief, a trained and certified emergency responder, removed his oxygen mask, was overcome himself, and died.

Corn is bad. Lets ban all corn silos.:rolleyes:

#13 Fiz

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:24 AM

The same could be said about any operation taking place in a containment area where oxygen is displaced.


so your problem isn't that what is say is wrong, but that industrial waste is bad in other sectors.

wow, that's a pretty convincing argument you have there.

Trained personnel know not to enter these areas as they are confined spaces and anyone worth a sh*t knows you need training and a permit to do so.

also I know you didn't read the article because the real problem is when these open air lagoons are flooded.

like is described in the article.

that you didn't read.

like when it happened when hurricane floyd washed all that stuff into a river.

#14 catfang

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:39 AM

so your problem isn't that what is say is wrong, but that industrial waste is bad in other sectors.

wow, that's a pretty convincing argument you have there.

also I know you didn't read the article because the real problem is when these open air lagoons are flooded.

like is described in the article.

that you didn't read.

like when it happened when hurricane floyd washed all that stuff into a river.


Most of the article describes the cruelty of pig farming, the stench associated with it, describes the fat cat of Smithfield farms jetting around in a private jet, desribes the authors experience when he went to a pig farm. About one page out of five discussed lagoon flooding and leaching into groundwater. Are you sure you read it?

Besides, you asked someone for one point of the article that someone had a problem with. I pointed it out. Fact is, industrial waste is nothing new and is not limited to people dying in pig sh*t. I guess I have a problem with the author. I agree lagoons are nasty nasty places, I've been to them. Have you?

#15 Fiz

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 11:50 AM

Besides, you asked someone for one point of the article that someone had a problem with. I pointed it out.

your point is irrelevant and trivial, and doesn't address an actual problem with the article itself.

the request was directed to Kurb, not you, to point out something wrong with the article after he tried to discredit it by naming its source and his involvement with the industry. since he's failed to do that, I'm going to assume he can't.


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