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Rick Santelli 2012


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#16 Fiz

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 01:50 AM

people don't need homes. they need shelter. shelter!=homes

even though i place blames on the lenders themselves, it doesn't mean that cheap land, abundant resources, a ridiculous american "vision", and a government willing to destroy other countries in pursuit of said vision haven't led to america pursuing a completely unsustainable lifestyle

if this economic collapse leads to the death of pointless suburbs, then i welcome it.

#17 dimbee

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:14 AM

I don't. I enjoy life in the suburbs.

#18 cookinwithgas

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:33 AM

I do too, but let's face it - spread out communities are not the best use of resources.

Like Europe, I see more people living in tighter communities, with our countries great amount of space letting us not have to congregate in big cities, but with high speed public transit or computer controlled highways getting people from living to working places. You can see the start of places like this in Charlotte, as well as what happens when growth does not go hand in hand with large scale planning (i.e. 485 in the Ballantyne area).

#19 Fiz

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 10:42 AM

I don't. I enjoy life in the suburbs.


just wait until the hydrocarbon economy collapses and you can't drive your car and there's no public transportation or way for them to transport food to you bahahahahaha WELCOME TO THE REFUGEE CAMPS

#20 dimbee

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 11:01 AM

just wait until the hydrocarbon economy collapses and you can't drive your car and there's no public transportation or way for them to transport food to you bahahahahaha WELCOME TO THE REFUGEE CAMPS


I live a block away from where I work, and you tell me what's closer to farms- downtown or suburbs?

#21 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 06:50 PM

I'm not saying either is more or less corrupt/at fault than the other. But, try to put yourself in the shoes of average Joe low income if you can, and an LO provides a scenario where they can "live the dream" and own a home. I'm not saying Joe shouldn't have done his due diligence, but the fact is most of them obviously didn't and jumped at the chance. I would imagine, given that situation, a person would be hopelessly optimistic and think that things would work out somehow.



I Grew up relatively poor, and was a junior enlisted in the military for a few years. I know how it works. There are those on both sides of the desk that fudge the numbers a bit, and both know the other is doing it. You are assuming that Joe low is stupid and doesn't know what he is doing. While that may be true in some cases, in most I think Joe knows what he is doing, but tends to get caught up in the rush of getting a new house. IMO, there are crooked brokers and honest ones, crooked customers and honest ones, and I just don't like singling out one over the other.

#22 dimbee

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 07:18 PM

You are assuming that Joe low is stupid and doesn't know what he is doing.


Where do you gather that from my post??? You may have hoped that I said that, but I did not, nor did I infer that

#23 Fiz

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 07:42 PM

I live a block away from where I work, and you tell me what's closer to farms- downtown or suburbs?


yes you fully grasp the problem.

#24 dimbee

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 07:49 PM

yes you fully grasp the problem.


Please do enlighten me, Fiz.

#25 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 08:03 PM

Where do you gather that from my post??? You may have hoped that I said that, but I did not, nor did I infer that


Why would I hope that you said that. I have no personal stake in this, its a debate nothing more.

Regardless, it seemed to me that you were implying that the average broker is smarter than the average customer. If thats incorrect, then I am sorry.

#26 Fiz

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 08:31 PM

Please do enlighten me, Fiz.


when the hydrocarbon economy finally collapses, your job will almost certainly become obsolete. Cities have mass transportation infrastructure available, so that a strong federal entity will be able to ship in food and supplies, but not to the suburbs because they're too spread out and there's no efficient way to do it. The vast majority of suburbs in the United States have no public transportation or rail lines, and without gas for the denizens to power their cars to, they will be stranded.

you say you're closer to farms being in the suburbs. Well, fertilizer is a byproduct of the hydrocarbon industry, and the soil in most of the country has been completely destroyed. Without fertilizer, much of the giant farms will be forced to lie fallow for years, and that's if they can get legumial plants to them, which isn't a given.

furthermore, what in the world could you do on a farm? do you know how to farm? do you know when to harvest something? do you know how the planting cycles work? do you know how to plow a field? do you know how deep to plant what seeds? there's not going to be any power, you won't be able to look this stuff up.

but yes once the hydrocarbon economy collapses, which could happen for any number of reasons, your life in the suburbs will collapse almost immediately.

#27 Jase

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 08:37 PM

[ame]http://www.amazon.co...35525823&sr=8-1[/ame]



^^will make you sh*t your pants to think about it.

#28 dimbee

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:08 PM

when the hydrocarbon economy finally collapses, your job will almost certainly become obsolete. Cities have mass transportation infrastructure available, so that a strong federal entity will be able to ship in food and supplies, but not to the suburbs because they're too spread out and there's no efficient way to do it. The vast majority of suburbs in the United States have no public transportation or rail lines, and without gas for the denizens to power their cars to, they will be stranded.


The suburb I'm in actually has the light rail coming to it. :seeya:


you say you're closer to farms being in the suburbs. Well, fertilizer is a byproduct of the hydrocarbon industry, and the soil in most of the country has been completely destroyed. Without fertilizer, much of the giant farms will be forced to lie fallow for years, and that's if they can get legumial plants to them, which isn't a given.


I had no idea that cow manure and organic waste are a byproduct of the hydrocarbon industry.

furthermore, what in the world could you do on a farm?


Farm it.

do you know how to farm?


Yes. I have the lucky background of having a 100 acre family farm that I am most experienced in working

do you know when to harvest something?


Yes.

do you know how the planting cycles work?


Yes.

do you know how to plow a field?


Yes.

do you know how deep to plant what seeds?


Yes. Any other questions?

there's not going to be any power, you won't be able to look this stuff up.


I don't need to.

but yes once the hydrocarbon economy collapses, which could happen for any number of reasons, your life in the suburbs will collapse almost immediately.


Thanks for your input. You obviously know nothing about me or my background.

KTHXBYE

:seeya:

#29 Fiz

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:24 PM

so you know how to grow food and plan on sustenance farming?

congrats you'll be the first against the wall when the hungry hordes come

#30 pstall

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 09:25 PM

And so comes to an end another good thread that had to get locked up after logic and blue collarness trumped Professor fed thinking.
I have said it for years. One day we are going to outsmart ourselves.
Simple life is still a good one.


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