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Fiz

A different take on the somali pirate attacks

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China calls them pilates.

do chinese pilates say...Awwwwghhh?

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More context. There are many who don't resort to the lazy easy way out with crime so that should be noted.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/12/opinion/12kaplan.html?_r=1

As Braudel suggested, there is nothing new here. Piracy has been endemic to the Indian Ocean from the Gulf of Aden to the Strait of Malacca, and particularly so after the Western intrusion into these waters, beginning with the Portuguese in the 16th century.

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if that is all true, you can see there reasons for it, but i very much doubt that the ransom $$ is going to 'the people'

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I read a story a few months ago that interviewed a lot of the local villagers from these sea towns, all of whom, while they know that what the pirates are doing is morally questionable, are definitely enjoying a better life from the money being thrown around by these guys. There's only so many ways to spend money in Somalia, and spending some of it on local goodwill is probably a cheap investment for them.

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Personally, I feel the only good Skinny is a dead Skinny.

Sorry if that sounds harsh but I was in the 1/75th Ranger Battallion from 1981 to 1984 and I still think they have some payback coming....

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The invasion by Somalia's historical enemy, Christian Ethiopia, soon elicited a bitter resistance, leading to the present crisis.

The official reason for US participation in Ethiopia's overthrow of the Islamist regime is the "war on terror" — which itself has engendered terror, quite apart from its own atrocities. Furthermore, the roots of the Islamic fundamentalist regime trace back to earlier stages of the "war on terror".

Immediately after September 11, the United States spearheaded an international effort to close down Al-Barakaat — a Dubai-based Somali remittance network that also runs major businesses in Somalia — on grounds that it was financing terror. This move was hailed by government and media as one of the great successes of the "war on terror". In contrast, Washington's withdrawal of its charges as without merit a year later aroused little interest.

The greatest impact of the closing of Al-Barakaat was in Somalia. According to the United Nations, in 2001 the enterprise was responsible for about half the $500 million remittances to Somalia, "more than it earns from any other economic sector and 10 times the amount of foreign aid (Somalia) receives".

Al-Barakat also played a major role in the economy, Ibrahim Warde observes in "The Price of Fear", his devastating study of Bush's "financial war on terror". The frivolous attack on a very fragile society "may have played a role in the rise ... of Islamic fundamentalists," Warde concludes — another familiar consequence of the "war on terror".

http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleNew.asp?section=opinion&xfile=data/opinion/2007/december/opinion_december88.xml

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Well, clearly they all deserve to die as they are terrorists!

I still get things that look like "Somali remittances" in my emails, so there must still be some terrorists out there...

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