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Should employers be able to factor in health concerns?

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Posted

As an employer, to me the obesity test would be an eyeball test and not any numerical thing like BMI. You either look fat and sloppy or your don't. Not sure that either of you guys would fail my eyeball test.

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Posted

shut it, fatties! ;)

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Posted

You want to have a foot race?

I would destroy you in anything....except listening to crappy death metal in your parents basement. You've got me there

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Posted

and neck bearding

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Posted

Employers should be able to hire or fire you for whatever reason they want.

It's their money.

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Posted

Employers should be able to hire or fire you for whatever reason they want.

It's their money.

but everyone has a right to a job and a living wage

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Posted

Yes.

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Posted

but everyone has a right to a job and a living wage

Positive rights don't exist. You can't be naturally obligated to something that someone else has to provide you.

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Posted

sounds fair enough to me.

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Posted

Positive rights don't exist. You can't be naturally obligated to something that someone else has to provide you.

not what the 99% says

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Posted

not what the 99% says

wait...oh I see what you did there

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Posted

We actually debated this very same issue in an ethics course when i was finishing my MBA.

I think there are completely different answers based on whether you are talking about say an employer charging a higher health insurance premium versus banning smoking at the job , or telling people how to operate in their personal lives.

one thing is it is absolutely NOT discrimination as a smoker or being obese isn't a protected class.

I have no issues with charging people higher health insurance premiums, I also have no issues with companies that ban smoking on their premises. I'd do the same if it were my company.

Where I draw the line though is telling people how they should live in the comfort of their own home. If someone smokes at home, how does that any of their employers business?

In the case we examined in my ethics class, the company involved started out by charging smokers a higher health insurance premium, they then said you have to quit smoking, and from there they also said that neither you or your spouse can smoke if you want to stay employed. Once items like this get allowed, where does it stop?

In my opinion, it is unethical or just morally wrong to tell people how to live their personal lives. To my it is a violation of a person's civil rights. It impinges on a person's right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. If they can ban smoking and require people to maintain a "healthy" weight (assuming it is unrelated to job function) lets keep going. Now the new rule is if you are a member of caronlinahuddle.com, you can't work here

Granted you always have a choice to work someplace else, but the same argument was used against people of color originally, or holding women back from having certain positions etc... I don't see this as any different

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