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Drill Baby, Drill....wait It Doesn't Reduce Gas Prices?

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Posted

They said it was a "tiny factor" in regards to supply, not consumption.

Duh, thats what I get for reading while getting yelled at by my wife. :)

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Posted

Petroleum should have gone the way of the cassette long ago. The longer we hold our selves back the longer we as a country will suffer. They can then speculate on how much electricity will be available. That may not change but what will is all our energy coming from home and not from people with something to gain by holding the country back

Petroleum should have gone the way of the cassette long ago. The longer we hold our selves back the linger we as a country will suffer. They can then speculate on how much electricity will be available. That may not change but what will is all our energy coming from home and not from people with something to gain by holding the country back

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The people who think government has no business investing in other energy sources because "the market will figure it out" dont realize that if we leave it up to the free market, nothing will get done until energy prices are sky high. Only problem with that is that in a globalized economy where most of our manufactured goods come from the other side of the planet, a significant increase in energy prices = inflation on a lot of other goods too. Plus we would fall behind other countries (*cough*Germany*cough*) who invest in other energy sources

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Posted

The people who think government has no business investing in other energy sources because "the market will figure it out" dont realize that if we leave it up to the free market, nothing will get done until energy prices are sky high. Only problem with that is that in a globalized economy where most of our manufactured goods come from the other side of the planet, a significant increase in energy prices = inflation on a lot of other goods too. Plus we would fall behind other countries (*cough*Germany*cough*) who invest in other energy sources

Let's not bring Germany into this.

Those idiots are trying to gut nuclear power.

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Posted

Let's not bring Germany into this.

Those idiots are trying to gut nuclear power.

Germany uses very little nuclear power anyway. They can replace their entire nuclear capacity with a relatively modest number of wind turbines.

Germany is on schedule to have an 80-100% renewable energy economy in my lifetime. That is astonishing for a country with 80 + million people.

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Posted

I don't get it.

I know it's a catchphrase that the right like to use. And a stupid one at that.

But it would seem logical to me that if there were oil in our backyard, it would lower at least our gas prices....no?

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Posted

I see some nice pwnage in this thread. Well done

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Posted

Germany uses very little nuclear power anyway. They can replace their entire nuclear capacity with a relatively modest number of wind turbines.

No.

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Posted

Germany only receives 140 terawatt hours per year from nuclear. They are adding 11 terawatts of renewable capacity each year and already produce over 100 terawatt hours from renewables each year. They receive 19 terawatt hours from hydro, 46.5 terawatt hours from wind, 32 terawatt hours from biomass, 19 terawatt hours from solar, 5 terawatt hours from biogenic, and much smaller amounts from a few other renewable sources for a total of 121 terawatt hours in 2011.

If they simply stay the course they'll replace their nuclear capacity within the decade.

Germany's electricity prices per kWh are among the highest in the world, but their average monthly bills are 80-100 dollars a month($118 in U.S. despite rates being about 1/3 those of Germany's) because Germans are much more efficient with their energy use than we are in the states. The average German house is about 1400 square feet, or the same size as the average American home in 1970 (before we decided that we needed multiple dining rooms, a bedroom for every child in the house, two living rooms, and entertainment room, a home office, and a guest bedroom).

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Posted

If they simply stay the course they'll replace their nuclear capacity within the decade.

This has literally been Germany's position for the last 30 years.

Doesn't change the fact that replacing one sustainable, clean energy source with another when you can just have both is the kind of logic only an environmentalist could find sound.

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Posted

Storage of nuclear waste at a certain point does not become sustainable. All countries do not have safe places to dispose of nuclear waste. The U.S. is several times larger than Germany and we only have a few suitable places for it (none of which are used).

Nuclear also requires an abundance of water resources. Again, Germany is much smaller than the U.S. and much more densely populated. They have limitations to the amount of nuclear they can install and maintain for this reason.

Another advantage that wind/solar have over nuclear is that it is distributed power. Less power generation is lost in transmission because it is often being used at the source rather than traveling hundreds of miles across wires. Centralized power is incredibly inefficient.

When you have centralized power systems, huge areas can lose electricity for long periods of time. See the blackout in the NE a few years ago. Amazing, just a few megawatts of solar or wind could have prevented that from happening by supplementing capacity.. The capacity wasn't there and over a billion dollars worth of productivity was lost that day.

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Posted

Germany only receives 140 terawatt hours per year from nuclear. They are adding 11 terawatts of renewable capacity each year and already produce over 100 terawatt hours from renewables each year. They receive 19 terawatt hours from hydro, 46.5 terawatt hours from wind, 32 terawatt hours from biomass, 19 terawatt hours from solar, 5 terawatt hours from biogenic, and much smaller amounts from a few other renewable sources for a total of 121 terawatt hours in 2011.

If they simply stay the course they'll replace their nuclear capacity within the decade.

Germany's electricity prices per kWh are among the highest in the world, but their average monthly bills are 80-100 dollars a month($118 in U.S. despite rates being about 1/3 those of Germany's) because Germans are much more efficient with their energy use than we are in the states. The average German house is about 1400 square feet, or the same size as the average American home in 1970 (before we decided that we needed multiple dining rooms, a bedroom for every child in the house, two living rooms, and entertainment room, a home office, and a guest bedroom).

Many Germans live in apartments. Homes are usually not heated by an electric heater with a fan blowing warm air into a room. Instead they circulate hot water, usually between several homes. Heating water is much less expensive than heating air. Also there is no need for central air. Even if you do have air conditioning, the government mandates when you can run it.

I've only seen wind turbines in the western parts of the country.

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