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Zod

Bruce Campbell A Panther...

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Some of you bash him now and say he's nothing special, but many of you will be in love with this guy if he becomes a dominant player for us. He went to the Raiders people. When was the last time they developed ANYONE with talent?

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This was a good trade, no matter Campbell's roster status at start of the season.

My confidence lies in the fact that our OL coach turned undrafted FA, Byron Bell into a decent RT in his first year. Bell is not athletically gifted, but was able to hold his opwn (most of the time...no he was not great & got a lot of penalties), but with Campbell, maybe they can ultimately turn him into a legit starter.

I thin he plays RG or ultimately a backup at LT. He plays too high & uses his hands/arms so much for me to think that he will be able to hold that RT position; I hope I'm wrong tho, of course. RT is where a guy could end up starting if Otah gets hurt...as usual.

Will be fun to see what they can do with him. I hope it's a lot for the team's sake & Campbell's sake.

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I dont think that he needs a shunt or anything like that yet. This man has been playing football for a long time. I am sure that there have always been doctors and coaches who have had concerns, and had him checked out to play, especially once he entered the NFL.

Also, given his defensive history as well, which is also pretty impressive, I think that the team may want to use him in special teams as well. Remember, even with his disadvantages, he still made it to the NFL. There has to be some potential for that to happen.

I do not know the mans history or current status. He was most likely diagnosed with this at an extremely young age and it was taken care of during his infancy. Most shunts are internal and drain into the stomach. It is not a big deal nowdays. The issue lies in the damage it accomplished before it was diagnosed.

Even so, a learning disability does not make you any less of a person or human being. Many people with learning disabilities go on to do great things. If our coaching staff approaches the situation correctly, he could possibly be one of the best lineman in the NFL.

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Not sure he'll stick, TBH. Raiders fans seem to have a pretty low opinion of him, but Goodson was going to get cut anyway, so whatever.

I always liked Campbell as a person -- seems to be a really dedicated player, a heck of nice guy and an amazing physical specimen. He does fit the old Al Davis mold though, athletes who are the big, strong and fast. The question has always been though whether or not he's a football player. On the surface, it looks like the Panthers and Raiders traded two players who will likely never turn into impact players let alone starters -- the Raiders are set on O-line and the Panthers are set at RB -- but I'm really hoping that Rivera can develop Campbell -- again I like him a lot. Now, if Goodson can only hang onto the ball every once in a while....

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I do not know the mans history or current status. He was most likely diagnosed with this at an extremely young age and it was taken care of during his infancy. Most shunts are internal and drain into the stomach. It is not a big deal nowdays. The issue lies in the damage it accomplished before it was diagnosed.

Even so, a learning disability does not make you any less of a person or human being. Many people with learning disabilities go on to do great things. If our coaching staff approaches the situation correctly, he could possibly be one of the best lineman in the NFL.

I'm not sure what exactly "it" is. Some in this thread have called it a mental disability, a learning disability, and a brain issue. No one here knows for sure what it is, and honestly, I wonder if it wasn't just something being put out there during the draft to scare teams off of him.

I just googled him and read an article that said he had brain surgery in high school for whatever "it" is... But, the stuff regarding him processing things slower or whatever, I don't know what to make of it because from all the interviews I've seen, he seems to be fine.

TBH, this is kind of uncomfortable to even speculate about.

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I'm not sure what exactly "it" is. Some in this thread have called it a mental disability, a learning disability, and a brain issue. No one here knows for sure what it is, and honestly, I wonder if it wasn't just something being put out there during the draft to scare teams off of him.

I just googled him and read an article that said he had brain surgery in high school for whatever "it" is... But, the stuff regarding him processing things slower or whatever, I don't know what to make of it because from all the interviews I've seen, he seems to be fine.

TBH, this is kind of uncomfortable to even speculate about.

Bruce Campbell only started 17 games at Maryland before making scouts drool at the combine with his large muscles and speed. The offensive tackle is a classic hit-or-miss prospect, but he has a couple of words scribbled down in his file that you just don't see:

Brain surgery.

Campbell had surgery in high school for a rare condition called Arnold-Chiari. It's a rare genetic disorder where some parts of the brain are formed abnormally.

Impairment and sometimes loss of motor control of the body and its extremities is one of the many effects. He had surgery at the base of his skull and has been checked out by plenty of NFL doctors with MRI machines. Campbell's talked about Arnold-Chiari enough that he is more confused about it than ever.

"After listening to all the doctors talk, I really don't know what it is," he said. "I really don't know how to explain it anymore. ... But I feel great."

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/04/19/SP981D1ACN.DTL#ixzz1qit9YpCr

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Chiari malformations (CMs) are structural defects in the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance. When the indented bony space at the lower rear of the skull is smaller than normal, the cerebellum and brainstem can be pushed downward. The resulting pressure on the cerebellum can block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (the liquid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord) and can cause a range of symptoms including dizziness, muscle weakness, numbness, vision problems, headache, and problems with balance and coordination. There are three primary types of CM. The most common is Type I, which may not cause symptoms and is often found by accident during an examination for another condition. Type II (also called Arnold-Chiari malformation) is usually accompanied by a myelomeningocele-a form of spina bifida that occurs when the spinal canal and backbone do not close before birth, causing the spinal cord to protrude through an opening in the back. This can cause partial or complete paralysis below the spinal opening. Type III is the most serious form of CM, and causes severe neurological defects. Other conditions sometimes associated with CM include hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, and spinal curvature.

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chiari/chiari.htm

I have no idea which type he has though.

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http://www.ninds.nih...iari/chiari.htm

I have no idea which type he has though.

Maybe some GMs were just talking out of their ass then, b/c it seems the biggest risk associated with the condition is motor skill-related, and he clearly has no problems in that department. Obviously, hydrocephalus can cause some serious damage and would have some harmful ramifications cognitively if it isn't addressed, but he didn't have surgery for it until he was in high school.

I'm not really seeing how that would have any effect on his ability to process or communicate as that one GM suggested? I don't know, it's out of my payscale, lol. I'm hoping and believing it has no effect on him now and he'll be a big addition for us.

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I have no idea which type he has though.

I would assume type1. If I remember correctly the 2s and 3s don't survive long and if they do, I don't think football would ever be an option.

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The issue really comes down to what the comorbid cognitive impairments associated with brain malformation are for this particular case. Truth be told, something happened in the interview process that turned this physically rated top 10 prospect into a 4th rounder drafted by the Raiders.

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This thread needs a Doctor

paging Dr. Oz

xm_moz_120x120.jpg

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Big boy to plug big hole no inuendo intended

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