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Creationism in Private Schools


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#1 Cat

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:01 AM

I thought some of you might get a kick out of this.


http://www.heraldsco...lution.17918511


One ACE textbook – Biology 1099, Accelerated Christian Education Inc – reads: "Are dinosaurs alive today? Scientists are becoming more convinced of their existence. Have you heard of the 'Loch Ness Monster' in Scotland? 'Nessie' for short has been recorded on sonar from a small submarine, described by eyewitnesses, and photographed by others. Nessie appears to be a plesiosaur."
Another claim taught is that a Japanese whaling boat once caught a dinosaur. It's unclear if the movie Godzilla was the inspiration for this lesson.



And some of you want this nonsense taught as an alternative in science class. lol

#2 Mr. Scot

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:07 AM

I don't necessarily want that taught in public schools :rolleyes:

With that said, the flat denial that any alternative to evolution is even possible is just plain intellectual cowardice.

How exactly does acknowledging that some people believe everything was created by a higher power damage a child's mind? For that matter, how does a complete refusal to acknowledge alternative explanations square with "tolerance"?

#3 Jase

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:13 AM

I saw a documentary called Dinoshark that disproves evolution as well.

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#4 Zod

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:14 AM

I don't necessarily want that taught in public schools :rolleyes:

With that said, the flat denial that any alternative to evolution is even possible is just plain intellectual cowardice.

How exactly does acknowledging that some people believe everything was created by a higher power damage a child's mind? For that matter, how does a complete refusal to acknowledge alternative explanations square with "tolerance"?


Easy, you only teach things in science class that have verifiable and observable evidence. Thats a requirement of anything scientific. Any ideas that lack evidence or ability to be observed belong in philosophy/world religions class.

#5 Cat

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:24 AM

oh yeah state vouchers are being used so some of these schools are publicly funded.

Another fun quote

"One of these texts from Bob Jones University Press claims that dinosaurs were fire-breathing dragons. It has little to do with science as we currently understand. It's more like medieval scholasticism."



#6 Cat

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:27 AM

I don't necessarily want that taught in public schools :rolleyes:

With that said, the flat denial that any alternative to evolution is even possible is just plain intellectual cowardice.

How exactly does acknowledging that some people believe everything was created by a higher power damage a child's mind? For that matter, how does a complete refusal to acknowledge alternative explanations square with "tolerance"?




I don't deny it's not possible, but teach science in the science class room and philosophy in the philosophy classroom. When there is science to back up the philosophy then you can start teaching it in a science class.

#7 Mr. Scot

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:28 AM

Easy, you only teach things in science class that have verifiable and observable evidence. Thats a requirement of anything scientific. Any ideas that lack evidence or ability to be observed belong in philosophy/world religions class.


And how exactly do you verify the "big bang"?

Why so much fear of even acknowledging that alternative theories exist?

#8 Zod

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:29 AM

Creationists are upset that science is ignoring them. Why? Because of how legitimate science is. Children naturally cling to it. They like seeing how and why things actually happen. Selling them a bunch of ideas with no concrete evidence is a tougher job. So they want it along side the science to help them validate it.

#9 Zod

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:30 AM

And how exactly do you verify the "big bang"?


Well, you take a look at how the uiniverse is expanding and at what rate, then play that in reverse. Everything ends up at a single point billions of years ago. Cool huh?

#10 Panthro

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:30 AM

Thank God my parochial schools never taught creationism

#11 Mr. Scot

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:35 AM

Well, you take a look at how the uiniverse is expanding and at what rate, then play that in reverse. Everything ends up at a single point billions of years ago. Cool huh?


Except there are non-Christian scientists who think the whole "Big Bang" thing is crap.

There are alternative non-Christian theories of intelligent design as well (comet spewing clouds and such).

You still haven't explained to me how not acknowledging that some people believe in alternative theories of how the universe came to be is a good thing.

We're supposed to be tolerant after all, right?

#12 Zod

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:37 AM

And how exactly do you verify the "big bang"? Why so much fear of even acknowledging that alternative theories exist?


I am fine with any theories that have some evidence to back them up. Those that don't belong in philosophy/religion class.

#13 Mr. Scot

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:37 AM

So tell me, should a scientist who believes in a higher power or the possibility of a higher power be accepted as a legitimate scientist?

#14 Zod

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:39 AM

So tell me, should a scientist who believes in a higher power or the possibility of a higher power be accepted as a legitimate scientist?


Sure, why not? How is this even a question?

#15 Cat

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 11:42 AM

And how exactly do you verify the "big bang"?

Why so much fear of even acknowledging that alternative theories exist?


You are incorrect in your assumption that their isn't scientific evidence that supports the big bang.
http://www.talkorigi...g.html#evidence

You acknowledge alternative theories in a science class if there is scientific evidence behind it. Creationism doesn't have scientific evidence to back it up.


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