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tarheelpride

Do Too Many Young People Go to College?

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Interesting article, giving perspective into the prevalence of degrees and their effect on the education system and employment

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203960804577239253121093694.html?mod=WSJ_WSJ_Careers_PublicSearch

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I've thought for some time, I know that when I was going thru school this was true, that there was too much emphasis on EVERYONE going to college. They cut 90% of the trade programs and forced everyone into college prep classes. Dumb, dumb move. Not everyone is cut out for college and trades are essential to our economy.

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I definitely think we are over-saturated with degrees in general. It dilutes the value of the degree if everyone has one. The diminishing manufacturing sector does have a role to play too. But, as long as employers require more advanced degrees for more basic tasks (they use this as a screening device), there will be a rush for these colleges and the degrees.

Having just finished college myself, I definitely see the over-saturation. I still can't find a job.

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On one hand, I do agree that college is over emphasized today. I have seen a number of jobs that require 4 year degrees, that could easily be done by someone that didn't have a 4 year degree, but had a decent aprenticship.

On the other hand, the company I work for brings in Indians and others, not because they work for less, but because they can't find enough people with the necessary education and experience for the job.

If you are going to go to college, make sure you get a degree in a field with a demand.

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all the kids want to go to 4 year schools to get a degree in graphic design, none want to go for archecture, is kind of the way I think of it.

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I think colleges like Standford have it right.

Even if you've only finished your freshman year, you can take up to a year off to explore jobs, try & establish a start-up, etc. You can come back after that year, or earlier, and it'll be like nothing happened. No extra fees to pay either.

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On one hand, I do agree that college is over emphasized today. I have seen a number of jobs that require 4 year degrees, that could easily be done by someone that didn't have a 4 year degree, but had a decent aprenticship.

On the other hand, the company I work for brings in Indians and others, not because they work for less, but because they can't find enough people with the necessary education and experience for the job.

If you are going to go to college, make sure you get a degree in a field with a demand.

This. the problem, to me, is not too many people going to college... it's more people not spending their time in college correctly.

there's no guarantee you get a job when you walk out the door if you plan things right, but there is a certain amount of thought that should go into a major beyond just what you think is a fun topic to write essays on.

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the public education system is a federally funded racket

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saturated market within a service economy only benefits other nations.

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I don't think too many go, but I think they're shoved too quickly out of high school and into college. The way it's set up these days, you're expected to pick your major and talk to recruiters while you're still in high school and think the photos you take of your shoes are awesome and you totally want to be a photographer when you grow up. Then when you're in your second year you start wasting money by skipping classes and dropping every course because you've realized you don't actually give a crap about this thing you pick when you were a kid.

I support using the first year to take gen ed stuff, get a little college experience, then take a few years off and come back later in your early-mid 20s if you have a better idea of what you want your future to be like.

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all the kids want to go to 4 year schools to get a degree in graphic design, none want to go for archecture, is kind of the way I think of it.

Architecture has one of the highest unemployment rates of all degrees. The last thing someone should do right now is consider a degree in architecture.

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I completely agree. 'No child left behind" is destroying our education system. It spends too much resources on kids that are not up to par... at the expense of kids who are naturally smart and need more challenge.

I know it sounds messed up to say something like that, but intelligence is genetic... and kids that are not bright enough to handle college education should instead be steered into a vocational program.

At the end of the day, no matter the good intentions, the 'not as smart' kids are not being prepared correctly for the future, because they didnt learn any real-world skills in school. So, in the long run, more harm than good is being done. It is as simple as that.

You don't have to be smart to do well in college, you just need maturity and a work ethic. I've seen plenty of dumb people get through college, because they worked at it.

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When I took accounting class at cpcc I promise to myself to never take another accounting class ever again. Here I am, 6 years later, working as a senior accountant with over 30hrs in accounting under my belt. I realized that accounting is one of the most demanding and most hated degrees. This yelled "job security" all the way. All my classmates got a job within first 6 months of graduating. Colleges are not oversaturated, certain degrees are.

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When I took accounting class at cpcc I promise to myself to never take another accounting class ever again. Here I am, 6 years later, working as a senior accountant with over 30hrs in accounting under my belt. I realized that accounting is one of the most demanding and most hated degrees. This yelled "job security" all the way. All my classmates got a job within first 6 months of graduating. Colleges are not oversaturated, certain degrees are.

Majoring in something/working a career just because it has good job security sounds like an awful way to live to me.

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