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I want that guy to be my trainer. The thing that limits me is no spotter. The hooks on the bench press have probably saved my life several times.

 

Yep... it's tough to do that bench work without a spotter.  No way to go to failure.

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Stretch afterwords. I'm not sure of your age, but the loss of flexibility is one of the biggest reason people 40+ hurt themselves. If you remain limber, you'll appreciate it later in life. At 36, I can still easily touch my toes.

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Yep... it's tough to do that bench work without a spotter.  No way to go to failure.

 

Those hooks say otherwise, oh and fug a smith machine.

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I did a kickboxing workout the other day. I'm done with those. Every time I do those workouts my hamstrings are in pain for days. 

 

Also the hubby upped the calories and has upped the weights and it shows :) me like.

 

 

Stretching helps, and I've always found that if I do hard cardio, like riding the bike for 10 minutes after I lift, I'm much less sore.

 

 

Hooks are fine, but still dangerous 88 on a barbell bench and trying to go to failure.  I rarely use a Smith for benching.

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If it doesn't kill me, I will be stronger.

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613x459.jpg?fit=scale&background=000000

 

 

It's that "kill me" part that bothers me... :)

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My wife told me last week that it was "ridiculous" that I still consider myself skinny and that I'm becoming "reverse anorexic". (half joking, half serious)

 

Fast forward to today and I see this article:

 

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/08/16/bigorexia-could-come-with-serious-side-effects/

 

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — It has often been perceived that women are constantly fixated on their diets. Now, a growing number of men have become obsessed with “bulking up.”

 

The new trend has been called “bigorexia” and it could come with some serious health consequences.

 

Early in his career, personal trainer Alfonso Moretti was obsessed with building his own muscles.

 

“It takes over your life. Every decision you make becomes the workout and how your body looks. I used to track and weigh every single ounce of food that went in my body. I used to wake up at 3 o’clock in the morning to drink protein shakes. I never missed a workout, ever, ever, ever,” he told CBS 2′s Maurice Dubois.

 

As many as 45-percent of men have fallen victim to bigorexia or muscle dysmorphia, according to Dr. Michele Kerulis the director of sports & health psychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology.

 

“I can remember as young as 13 or 14, looking at some of these muscle magazines, and I was conditioned to think that’s what a man looked like. Big shoulders, big legs, just big muscles with veins everywhere,” Moretti said.

 

The emotional impact can be devastating.

...

 

What a crock of poo.

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My wife told me last week that it was "ridiculous" that I still consider myself skinny and that I'm becoming "reverse anorexic". (half joking, half serious)

 

Fast forward to today and I see this article:

 

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2013/08/16/bigorexia-could-come-with-serious-side-effects/

 

 

What a crock of poo.

 

When my wife says the size of my muscles makes her vagina dry up like a bag of salt, I've gotten too big.

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lol

 

I saw that this morning... I can see how some people get caught up in thinking they always need to be bigger.

 

It is addicting, I've always acknowledged that... it feels great to go and work out and get bigger.

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The whole concept sounds like fitness shaming to me. This article says "obsession", I say "commitment".

Only in America is committing to nutrition and exercise with the goal of improving your body considered a disorder.

It takes, like, 2 hours a day to track your food intake and workout.

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Luckily I'll never have a problem like that. I'm about as hard a gainer as there is. I consume upwards of 6000 calories per day and I still can't get much bigger. It really sucks.

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The whole concept sounds like fitness shaming to me. This article says "obsession", I say "commitment".

Only in America is committing to nutrition and exercise with the goal of improving your body considered a disorder.

It takes, like, 2 hours a day to track your food intake and workout.

 

I agree.

 

I'm sure some people can have a "disorder" involving body image and wanting to get bigger, but to imply that anyone who works out is doing that is not right.

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I agree.

 

I'm sure some people can have a "disorder" involving body image and wanting to get bigger, but to imply that anyone who works out is doing that is not right.

 

There is definitely a way to take fitness too far. Sure, your physical health may be tremendous, but it can certainly take a toll on your mental health.

 

I agree though. Implying that anyone who is dedicated to fitness has some sort of disorder is absurd. It takes time and it becomes a big part of your life. I don't think that's unhealthy at all.

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I see it as the same mindset that drives people to be athletes or musicians. A goal is set and whatever work is necessary is done to accomplish the goal. Some say it's obsessive, but a lot of people lack the mettle to accomplish difficult goals

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I stretch before and after a work out for a while.

 

I'm going to have to take the roller to my hammies and my upper calves. ouch

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I stretch before and after a work out for a while.

 

I'm going to have to take the roller to my hammies and my upper calves. ouch

 

I have a feeling that your husband won't mind helping out with that...

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amount-of-work-required-to-look-good--me

 

i've been watching the CT Fletcher videos on days when i just don't feel like working out.   it helps.

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also smith machines are awesome when you get older.   i'll use anything and everything to work out.   except a nautilus.

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I use the Smith, just rarely for benching...  too easy to drop having to twist it.

 

 

 

 

 

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I haven't been very sore from the past couple or workouts. I at least thought I'd be feeling it in my lats more. Probably going to hit shoulders today, try to work something new in.

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that's one of the benefits of using a cable system.   you can rep to failure without having to worry as much about injury

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I use cables for somethings, but there's just something about a bench press or a squat

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Yep... it's tough to do that bench work without a spotter.  No way to go to failure.

Going to failure doesn't serve any purpose in getting stronger. Try following a program that uses percentages of your max press. They usually don't go over 80-85% of your max and you see major changes in soreness (which is bad, not good) and strength. Google 5/3/1 program. 

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Going to failure doesn't serve any purpose in getting stronger. Try following a program that uses percentages of your max press. They usually don't go over 80-85% of your max and you see major changes in soreness (which is bad, not good) and strength. Google 5/3/1 program. 

 

It's like that giant guy in the video PSC posted said... it's different for different people.

 

I've done exercises to failure before, but don't do it often because I don't often work with a partner.  Joscott and I workout on the weekends some, but not during the week...

 

Having said that, I do some power lifts, but strength is not my main goal...  my goals are kind of mixed...

 

I like getting stronger and I'm stronger than I've ever been but it's not really my main focus...   At 40 I can bench 300 (1RM), deadlift over 300 for reps and squat 400 (although I don't squat much due to my shoulders)... so I'm pretty happy with that as is.

 

I want to see what I can deadlift... I did 315 6X today, but don't really want to push it either... I'm pretty confident I can get 350 at least 2 times, but I have to work tomorrow and figured I'd done enough.

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It's like that giant guy in the video PSC posted said... it's different for different people.

 

I've done exercises to failure before, but don't do it often because I don't often work with a partner.  Joscott and I workout on the weekends some, but not during the week...

 

Having said that, I do some power lifts, but strength is not my main goal...  my goals are kind of mixed...

 

I like getting stronger and I'm stronger than I've ever been but it's not really my main focus...   At 40 I can bench 300 (1RM), deadlift over 300 for reps and squat 400 (although I don't squat much due to my shoulders)... so I'm pretty happy with that as is.

 

I want to see what I can deadlift... I did 315 6X today, but don't really want to push it either... I'm pretty confident I can get 350 at least 2 times, but I have to work tomorrow and figured I'd done enough.

thats an admirable goal! and the weight your pushing is solid! good job!

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