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Cam Newton one of NFC's most Overrated Players


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#31 Captain Morgan

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:15 PM

it's not just the lockout part....Cam had a new coach, a new OC, and plays the harded position in football.

lol at that article..what Cam did was amazing

#32 Rubi

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:15 PM

You watching all the games makes Newton a touch passer? Your first set of examples were bad throws, LaFell with Washington and Olsen with Green Bay are better. Even with these throws he is still inaccurate because he does not keep his feet under him. Since you watched ALL the games go back and look at what I am talking about.



"stoner420" maybe when the smoke clears you'll be able to see my point

you claimed that he needs to work on his touch and accuracy...i say thats nonsense.. he made plenty of soft accurate passes. He doesnt keep his feet under him? i forgot that in every situation in the nfl you are required to use perfect mechanics and form. NO WAY you can improvise and just be an athlete to get the job done. His footwork is excellent "in the eye of the storm"...coming from a former QB in the NFL. Your point of view is blurred/hazy/incorrect. Not many fans in the NFL???? what planet are you living on?

Hatorade for stoner420

#33 CatMan72

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:16 PM

ESPN trolling.

#34 SOJA

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:27 PM

if Cam Newton is one of the most overrated, Chris Gamble's season last year was one of the most vastly underrated. yes I am still very bitter.

#35 X-Clown

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:35 PM

KC Joyner article written in August of 2009:

When one looks at a single postseason game, it might make sense to ditch Delhomme and go in another direction. When the entirety of the circumstances and metrics are taken into account, it is quite easy to see why Panthers management stuck by Delhomme. He’s not just the best quarterback they have – he is still one of the best quarterbacks in the league.


http://fifthdown.blo...se-of-delhomme/

#36 rodeo

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:35 PM

I bet you if you ask the guy for a more accurate rookie he would say Dalton, oblivious that Cam had a better completion %.

#37 SIGCHI222

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:38 PM

Those are impressive marks on their face but they are quantity-based and occurred after a lockout-truncated offseason. As I mentioned in my fantasy football draft guide, the lockout hurt defenses' ability to practice blitzes, which was a primary factor in why passing offenses were so explosive early on.

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#38 AvatarBlock

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:02 PM

Just to remind those who insist on posting KC Joyner articles, here is a list of his Cam-related pieces dating back to April of 2011:


Cam Newton isn't a first-round pick
The former Auburn QB has several glaring flaws similar to The Golden Calf of Bristol


Cam Newton's many hurdles
Seven more reasons Newton could have a very difficult NFL transition

Patrick Peterson should go No. 1
The former LSU CB is a better pick than either Cam Newton or Blaine Gabbert


Pass Plays: Don't buy hype on Cam Newton, Plaxico Burress


Andy Dalton is NFL's top rookie
Cam Newton has been impressive, but the Rookie of the Year isn't about hype


Why Robert Griffin III can beat Cam Newton's rookie passing record


NFC's most overrated players
Cam Newton, Michael Bush among players whose hype exceeds performance




And with that, let's please stop giving this man the time of day.


#39 I Mean He Was Found Guilty

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:07 PM

yes, the rookie of the year award is too about "hype" if by "hype" you mean an individual performance over the course of the season. it's a freaking individual award for chrissakes, not a team one - should henry hynoski have won it because his team won the super bowl?

#40 NCstoner420

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:12 PM

"stoner420" maybe when the smoke clears you'll be able to see my point

you claimed that he needs to work on his touch and accuracy...i say thats nonsense.. he made plenty of soft accurate passes. He doesnt keep his feet under him? i forgot that in every situation in the nfl you are required to use perfect mechanics and form. NO WAY you can improvise and just be an athlete to get the job done. His footwork is excellent "in the eye of the storm"...coming from a former QB in the NFL. Your point of view is blurred/hazy/incorrect. Not many fans in the NFL???? what planet are you living on?

Hatorade for stoner420


You could count on one hand the amount of fans that he had before the NFL draft but I forgot that everyone's a genius in foresight.

#41 KillerKat

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:17 PM

So last year at this time, Newton was a piece of sh**. Now he's overrated? Get f**ked.

#42 Cary Kollins

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:23 PM

I knew this was going to be a KC Joyner article before I even opened the thread.

KC Joyner actually makes a living trolling out articles based on jacked up stats that he manipulates to fit his story. Here is the aforementioned article he wrote before the 2011 draft:

Cam Newton isn't a first-round pick

As valuable as size, speed and strength are, they do have limitations when evaluating players. Pro football history is full of imposing physical specimens who didn't pan out because they had some weaknesses that more than offset their elite physical attributes (e.g. Brian Bosworth, Mike Mamula, Lawrence Phillips).


Despite the clear historical warnings, in just about every draft there are teams that will select a player based on his physical attributes, ignoring his glaring football deficiencies.


The 2010 Denver Broncos offered a good example of this when they drafted last year's somewhat flawed quarterbacking phenom, The Golden Calf of Bristol. The recent comments of John Elway, one of the Broncos' new head honchos and a man who knows a thing or two about quarterbacking, that The Golden Calf of Bristol is still "very raw," even after a year in the system, say their organization is probably going through a serious case of buyer's remorse.


This is something that teams should keep in mind when considering drafting former Auburn Tigers quarterback Cam Newton in the first round of the 2011 NFL draft. His physical characteristics are off the charts (6-foot-5, 248 pounds, 4.59 40-yard dash time), but a tape review of his 2010 season shows several significant weaknesses that make him more than a bit of a first-round risk.


There are a wide variety of areas that should concern NFL teams and were apparent when I went back and reviewed tape on Newton, but the three most significant are:



1. Footwork



To say Newton's footwork was inconsistent would be giving it credit it doesn't deserve; it was almost as if this part of his game was an afterthought.


One clear-cut example of this occurred on the opening play of the second quarter of the game against the Arkansas Razorbacks. Newton had Darvin Adams wide open in the end zone but badly overthrew the pass.


At first glance, the blame for the incompletion would seem to fall on the lineman who allowed an Arkansas defender to push him a couple of steps backward into the pocket.


Upon closer inspection, though, it became clear that Newton was actually at fault because his drop wasn't deep enough. He should have been nine yards away from the line of scrimmage but ended up only eight yards back.


Had he been at the proper nine-yard depth, he would have had room to step into the pass. Instead, he had to adjust his delivery to avoid the defender's arm, leading to the overthrow and a missed 26-yard touchdown pass.


This was one of many instances last season where Newton either got too much or too little depth in the pocket.




2. Lack of urgency in his backpedal



One of the recurring mantras of nearly every offensive coordinator in the NFL is that the quarterback get back in his drop as quickly as possible. Most passing plays require the ball to be in the air by the three-second mark. The faster the quarterback can get to the spot where the ball is to be delivered from, the more likely he is to get the ball off on time.


Getting back to his launch point quickly is something that Newton almost never did. A telling instance of this nature occurred late in the first quarter of the Kentucky game.


The play called for a play-action fake and a seven-step drop. Newton's first mistake was to turn his head to watch the runner for a very short time after the fake handoff. While that may have been in an effort to throw off the defense, it also delayed Newton from getting his head around to look at the coverage.


That was only one part of a very deliberate drop and it was a key reason it took Newton 2.1 seconds to get his head around to start looking downfield. The two extra steps Newton took in an effort to get his entire body into the pass compounded the delay and ended up allowing a Kentucky cornerback to leave one area of coverage on the field and get over to help force an incompletion. Had Newton been just a bit faster in any part of his drop or delivery, he would have been able to hit his receiver for a 34-yard touchdown pass.




3. Not stepping into passes to avoid contact



A third major issue that showed up in the tape review was Newton's propensity to let go of passes a step early to brace himself for a hit from a defender.


This occurred all season long, but it was potentially most costly in the BCS title game against the Oregon Ducks. Auburn was down 11-7 and had a fourth-and-goal at the Ducks 1-yard line late in the second quarter.



When errors of this nature are added to Newton's off-field issues and his inconsistent combine performance, both from a physical and mental perspective, it emphasizes just how much of a risk he is.
The play called for the running back to fake a block and then release on a short pass into the end zone. Everything worked fine on the route, except that an Oregon defender read the play and started to blitz.


The defender wasn't quite moving at full speed because he had initially stopped to bite on a run fake by Newton. This meant Newton had enough time to step into the pass and take what ended up being not much of a hit.


Instead of doing that, Newton decided to try to wing the pass with his arm. The resulting underthrow led to an incompletion and kept six points off of the board in the championship contest.


These three areas combined for dozens of Newton's mistakes during the season, and this is far from a comprehensive list. When errors of this nature are added to Newton's off-field issues and his inconsistent combine performance, from a physical and mental perspective, it emphasizes just how much of a risk he is.


The odds are quite good that some team will be saying the same thing about Newton a year from now that the Broncos are saying about The Golden Calf of Bristol today. Whether or not those comments come with a The Golden Calf of Bristol-like case of buyer's remorse will depend on if that team was foolish enough to invest a first-round pick on Newton's potential.

#43 mwright350

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:23 PM

Reporters are aggravating. They put in some things that are true then give a title / conclusion that are way overstated.

That way when the inevitable message board arguments break out and their piece gets thrown all around the internet two sides can have totally different arguments that are just close enough that noone notices.

Side A: The conclusion is wrong

Side B: But the stats are correct!

<commence internet deathmatch>

#44 Peppers90 NC

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:24 PM

so it's too early in his career to say he is good but not too early to say he is overrated? why don't any of these writers see the correlation with the increased production in the run game as the season progressed?

#45 fieryprophet

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:33 PM

I'm glad people like this still exist: Cam needs all the critics he can get. He has that edge that thrives on proving people wrong.

And everytime they say stupid crap like this their credibility takes a hit. Nawrocki can't go anywhere without being taunted about his "fake smile."

They have zero bearing on the team's future, so. . .enjoy them while they last ;)


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