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Couple Questions about TV Buying

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Posted

I've never owned a plasma, and the store settings aren't indicative of what you'll see once you're home. Therefore I can't really comment about their overall appeal. I know they used to suffer from a lot of "burn in" problems. I've heard technology has advanced enough to stop that from happening. Maybe in a few years, I'll shoot for plasma. As for now, I'm still a little cautious about them.

I'm glad you're doing your homework about it. When I bought my first HDTV, I just went for what I thought was the best deal at the time. I didn't do much research at all. This was before 1080p was around. The TV claimed to be 1080i. I noticed that the edges of the screen were always cut off. Upon further examination, it wasn't 1080i at all. Instead of 1920x1080 resolution, it was something strange like 1746x1050. The picture quality was great - far better than I expected, but my eyes always focused on the edges when it was obvious that part of the screen was cut off. Over time, it developed a "droop" in the bottom middle portion of the screen. If I were watching football and the scores were scrolling, it would sag off the bottom of the screen as it passed that part. It was an old, rear projection HDTV, set in a huge cabinet with wheels. I still have it, but it's in the kids' playroom with rabbit ears connected to it. Since it predates a digital tuner, I have to use the digital converter box. It completely ruins the picture quality.

My main concern was the burn in issue. At the time, 6 years ago, the theory was if I played to much madden I would have had the field burnt in permanently. That's why we went with LCD. Now they say it's no longer an issue so we went with the plasma to get the bigger screen.

The picture is amazing. The only drawback is the glare. Don't recall it being as bad on an LCD.

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Posted

1080 is good AFTER 46 inches. Its nearly negligble under 46 when compared to 720.

I'm looking to get a 47 in the next few weeks. LED fo sho.

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as far as glare, that was one of the things I looked into before i bought the vizio. i made sure whatever i bought had a matte screen

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I'm gonna buy a TV in next few weeks. 1080p 120hz LED 55" for $900 at hhrgreg. Pretty good deal. I would wait tho... TV prices will take a dive in November due to new TV technology release. New era of TVs, 4k TVs, comes out in 2 months and their starting price is $10,000...

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I've got 3 Vizio LCDs and am happy with all of them... They're 55", 42". and 36" I think...

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Got a Vizio 32" LED TV. Very happy with it and got it off Amazon refurbished. You can't go wrong with a Vizio. I also like the quality of the Sharp Aquios TV's and LG is a safe bet.

I'd recommend shopping around on Amazon some and reading the reviews. They'll help guide you in the right direction.

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Everyone sees TV's differently.

Some folks like the look of LED, some plasma.

For my eyes, it's Samsung Plasma that looks the best. I will be getting a 60 or so inch in the coming months, and will be doing my research then.

My biggest thing is I want to be able for it to communicate via Blue Tooth with my PC so I can stream movies off of Netflix, or at least through my PS3. I am not sure what the wording is that I need to look for to make sure it will do this.

Any ideas?

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My main concern was the burn in issue. At the time, 6 years ago, the theory was if I played to much madden I would have had the field burnt in permanently. That's why we went with LCD. Now they say it's no longer an issue so we went with the plasma to get the bigger screen.

The picture is amazing. The only drawback is the glare. Don't recall it being as bad on an LCD.

I think I remember reading that plasmas have more glare than LCDs because they have glass screens and the LCDs can have a matte plastic screen.

That said, I went from a 46" Samsung LCD that I was never really happy with, to a 52" panisonic plasma that I really really like. No burn in whatsoever after 2 years and I game on it quite a bit. It has a feature called "scrolling bar" that I run if I've used the tv for more than a few hours. White bar on a black background, seems like it wipes any residual images away.

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Posted

I can give a bit of insight on TV's as I work in the Samsung call center providing training for the agents. THis will not be biased towards Samsung, just an overall perspective on TVs.

LED TVs are the top of the line at this point. Most LEDs are edge lit now to provide a thinner profile. It does not really affect the picture quality, unless you are watching a larger screen (i.e. 46 inches +) and the scene is really dark. Then you may see some light bleeding at the edges, but not really enough to worry about.

LCD TVs are good, but are heavier and thicker. If you are going to be wall mounting, spend the extra money on an LED. Otherwise, you might as well go with an LCD, they are cheaper, and have the same functionality depending on the model you select.

Plasma TVs have come a long way in regards to burn in. There are options within the menu to active screen protective features such as pixel shift, which moves the image imperceptibly to prevent the burn in form occurring. Plasma TVs have richer colors, as they are able to get a truer black. In plasma TVs to get black, the pixel is simply turned off. You cannot do this at this point in an LCD or LED tv, so there is no true black. The darker the black, the richer the colors. Plasma TVs also have a glass screen, so if you are putting the TV in a bright area, you will get more reflection on the screen.

The 60 htz vs 120-240 htz can be summarized like this. All TV signals are broadcast in 60 htz (or 60 frames per second). The TV is able to look at two frames and replicate a frame between them to shorten the distance between images that are moving. This creates a smoother picture. It is really only noticeable on faster moving objects. Plasma TVs are capable in some cases of up to 600 htz. This is great for gaming, as long as you have the pixel shift on, and don't leave the game paused for long periods of time.

Overall which TV you get really depends on what you are going to be doing, and where you will be putting it. In a darker room, and to be used primarily for gaming and sports, I would go with a plasma. In a brighter room, for a combination of uses, I would go with an LED for wall mount, of an LCD for table, or entertainment center placement.

Oh, and with resolution, currently 1080p is the industry standard for HD signals. They are working on much higher resolutions, but the bandwidth needed to transmit the signals is staggering, and the cable and satellite companies would not be able to keep up with the demand. It is estimated that the "4k" resolution, which is something like 4096 lines of resolution would require a 28 Gbps transmission speed.

I hope this information is helpful.

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Posted

I think that's why I never liked my LCD very much. The black always looked back lit like it was glowing. I know some brands get closer to true black than others and after researching, Samsung was supposed to be one of the best. I could just never get it to where I liked it.

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I've definitely noticed that blacks look better on plasma TVs, but the only time I really notice it is when watching movies. They also use a bit more electricity than LCDs, you can feel the heat they give off

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Posted

I can give a bit of insight on TV's as I work in the Samsung call center providing training for the agents. THis will not be biased towards Samsung, just an overall perspective on TVs.

LED TVs are the top of the line at this point. Most LEDs are edge lit now to provide a thinner profile. It does not really affect the picture quality, unless you are watching a larger screen (i.e. 46 inches +) and the scene is really dark. Then you may see some light bleeding at the edges, but not really enough to worry about.

LCD TVs are good, but are heavier and thicker. If you are going to be wall mounting, spend the extra money on an LED. Otherwise, you might as well go with an LCD, they are cheaper, and have the same functionality depending on the model you select.

Plasma TVs have come a long way in regards to burn in. There are options within the menu to active screen protective features such as pixel shift, which moves the image imperceptibly to prevent the burn in form occurring. Plasma TVs have richer colors, as they are able to get a truer black. In plasma TVs to get black, the pixel is simply turned off. You cannot do this at this point in an LCD or LED tv, so there is no true black. The darker the black, the richer the colors. Plasma TVs also have a glass screen, so if you are putting the TV in a bright area, you will get more reflection on the screen.

The 60 htz vs 120-240 htz can be summarized like this. All TV signals are broadcast in 60 htz (or 60 frames per second). The TV is able to look at two frames and replicate a frame between them to shorten the distance between images that are moving. This creates a smoother picture. It is really only noticeable on faster moving objects. Plasma TVs are capable in some cases of up to 600 htz. This is great for gaming, as long as you have the pixel shift on, and don't leave the game paused for long periods of time.

Overall which TV you get really depends on what you are going to be doing, and where you will be putting it. In a darker room, and to be used primarily for gaming and sports, I would go with a plasma. In a brighter room, for a combination of uses, I would go with an LED for wall mount, of an LCD for table, or entertainment center placement.

Oh, and with resolution, currently 1080p is the industry standard for HD signals. They are working on much higher resolutions, but the bandwidth needed to transmit the signals is staggering, and the cable and satellite companies would not be able to keep up with the demand. It is estimated that the "4k" resolution, which is something like 4096 lines of resolution would require a 28 Gbps transmission speed.

I hope this information is helpful.

Very informative. Thank you.

I have a question about Samsung products. I used to own a samsung and I know it's a really good product, never had any problems with my tv. It was a 40 inch LCD.

I want to probably buy a new one within the next year or so. I may buy refurbished since I know there's nothing generally wrong with those types of products. But my question is, if you could help me.

For my next TV, i'd like to stay around the 500-750 range. I don't care for the whole 3D gimmick. I will use this TV mostly for Games, Movies and watching TV shows obviously. I know samsung offers some TV's with Internet apps and internet ready TV's. For someone like me that insn't in the USA. Would I have problems with that feature of the TV? I know I wouldn't be able to access Hulu and Netflix down here which sucks since I love both of them. Would it be worth it either way for what I will be using it for?

Can you recommend other Samsung TVs?

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