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Blue Line Extension to Receive Full Funding On October 16th


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#25 Niner National

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 03:03 PM

The new line needs to go between Prov rd and uptown. Free up traffic on that road and 51 as well as 485. The university line is not as urgent imo.
I think keeping a shuttle system from uptown to the airport is easier than a rail. But you do have to expect growth and let that grow around the rail lines that get built.

I disagree on the University line. The University area has a high population density and is a fairly large business center (although most of those business centers are not directly accessibly via rail). The old IBM building has been retrofitted and has several large tenants moving there, not to mention the thousands that work at the university itself.

More than anything, I think it was necessary to keep the northern part of the county happy. They contribute to the 1/2 cent transit tax as well, so they need see that they're getting something out of the arrangement as well. If the southern part of the county got another line before the northern part, they wouldn't be too happy. The line up to the university will help people in the Huntersville area get into uptown the same the Pineville stop helps S. Charlotte residents get into uptown.

The University City area has over 200,000 residents. That's a pretty big chunk of the Charlotte population.

I'd love to see a line down Providence someday, but if it ever happens, it'll come at the expense of a lane of traffic, which I don't think people would be too happy about. The road cannot really be widened along most of Providence Road and there is no way they're going to chop down those old trees to add in rail.

#26 google larry davis

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 06:32 PM

I agree. What a waste of money connecting a train to the university....great college students who couldnt get into UNC or State can now come into the city and drink....hooza


i don't know anything about this train or whatever but...couldn't get into state? what, is this train running to a community college or something?

#27 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 06:57 PM

Waiting for the Wilmington Line so I can go to more tailgates...


I know for a fact that the mapping has been completed for the Monroe bypass... And I suspect that the EIS has been too... When/if it will actually be built, who the hell knows...
High speed Trains (or really any mass transit) between cities will never happen in America... Too much distance and not enough demand.

#28 Chimera

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 01:20 AM

I know for a fact that the mapping has been completed for the Monroe bypass... And I suspect that the EIS has been too... When/if it will actually be built, who the hell knows...
High speed Trains (or really any mass transit) between cities will never happen in America... Too much distance and not enough demand.


I think it would work in a few regions... cities around the Great Lakes for example. Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland, Chicago, work with Canada to connect Toronto with Detroit and Buffalo. Once Buffalo is connected, you can expand through the northeast.

But I don't think it would work anywhere else and I'm not sure it'll be anywhere near cost effective.

#29 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 03:23 PM

I think it would work in a few regions... cities around the Great Lakes for example. Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland, Chicago, work with Canada to connect Toronto with Detroit and Buffalo. Once Buffalo is connected, you can expand through the northeast.

But I don't think it would work anywhere else and I'm not sure it'll be anywhere near cost effective.


It would probably work better along the Boston, NY, Philly, DC line. A heavier concentration of the population along with a populace that is already somewhat accustomed to mass transit. Amtrak's best routes are in the Northeast, and I think that is where the first high speed lines should go.


Putting high speed rail anywhere in the South (except perhaps Florida) or Midwest would be a mistake imo.

#30 Herbert The Love Bug

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 03:33 PM

let's have a whole bunch of lines and stack them on top of each other and makes cool star designs and have fancy music playing on the outside when they go by

#31 Niner National

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 05:00 PM

It would probably work better along the Boston, NY, Philly, DC line. A heavier concentration of the population along with a populace that is already somewhat accustomed to mass transit. Amtrak's best routes are in the Northeast, and I think that is where the first high speed lines should go.


Putting high speed rail anywhere in the South (except perhaps Florida) or Midwest would be a mistake imo.

This may come as a surprise, but the NC line does very well (compared to other rail lines).

There is one "high speed" rail line in the U.S., the Acela in the N.E. from DC to Boston. It is the only profitable rail line in the U.S.

The next best performing line (financially) is the North Carolina line. If it continues to grow at the rates it has been, it will be profitable in the near future.

#32 Davidson Deac II

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 09:47 PM

This may come as a surprise, but the NC line does very well (compared to other rail lines).

There is one "high speed" rail line in the U.S., the Acela in the N.E. from DC to Boston. It is the only profitable rail line in the U.S.

The next best performing line (financially) is the North Carolina line. If it continues to grow at the rates it has been, it will be profitable in the near future.


Didn't know that. Thanks, and I am glad that it is performing well. I imagine that part of that is because it hits all the major metro areas (triad, triangle and Charlotte). I have considered taking Rail on a few trips myself. If they get the new station built, and the trains have the same schedule, I will definitely consider taking the train to a Panthers game.

But I am not certain that means high speed rail would be successful financially. From what I understand, the upgrades are pretty expensive.

#33 ARSEN

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 11:14 PM

I live 10 mins from Monroe Rd. I'd love if line came to Matthews.