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Bwood

Say hello to your 2013 1st round draft pick

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You've obviously never evaluated football prospects in your entire life.

Have you?

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Guys braces on both knees is the style in college.

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Man I really want Star, but I think Luke is needed much more than Star at this point.

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On a real note?

Jarvis Jones.

Imagine him and Keuchly

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Dare we use our first draft pick on guys named Luke with commonly mispronounced last names two years in a row?!

Hopefully.

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Knowing this team they would make him play RG and ruin his career because of loyalty to Gross. Gross may be the second best O-Lineman on the roster, but if we draft Joeckel, Gross needs to move or leave.

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On a real note?

Jarvis Jones.

Imagine him and Keuchly

Here's another one that doesn't know talent.

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One of the weaker OT classes we’ve seen in a while. That said, there are more LT prospects than usual, and teams looking to shore up pass protection will have a lot to choose from. Again, I think we’re seeing the effect of CFB moving to a more pass-happy plan; lots of lighter, quicker guys amongst this group, few maulers.

1. Luke Joeckel, A&M (1st)

Ideal mix of size and agility for the LT position in the NFL. Footwork is consistently excellent as is balance. Can deal effectively with both speed and power rushers. Only knock in pass protection is on his hand technique. Is just an above average run blocker but has good technique and general awareness. Polished and heady player. Well regarded by coaches and teammates.

2. Taylor Lewan, Michigan (1st-2nd)

Tremendous frame; will get much bigger and stronger in the NFL. Very good run blocker already; pass protection technique is still raw, but has the athleticism to play the LT position in the NFL. Very aggressive, nasty player, loves running guys into the dirt. Biggest knock is his technique/balance against strength rushers. More of a developmental prospect but has a lot of upside.

3. Jake Matthews, A&M (1st-2nd)

Bruce Matthews kid which owns. Really outstanding combination of size, strength, and mobility. Would be starting LT on all but maybe three teams in CFB, may look to move to that position in the NFL. Excellent run blocker, has the feet to eventually be a very reliable pass blocker as well. Strength in both run and pass blocking is excellent. Pass protection technique and balance are still raw and need work. Will likely start out as a RT.

4. DJ Fluker, Alabama (1st-2nd)

Was once a top 10 possibility but is falling at this point. Pure RT prospect, one of the best run blocking tackles we’ve seen in recent years. Straight line blocking is outstanding, locks onto defender and can drive them deep into the backfield. Pass protection is only average and seems to be getting worse. Doesn’t move side to side well and balance is noticeably poor when in pass pro. May wind up moving to guard in the NFL if he doesn’t show more agility and technique. Has had conditioning/weight issues since childhood.

5. Dallas Thomas, Tennesee (2nd)

Very reliable and experienced player. Moved inside to guard this season but has the frame and athleticism to play LT in the NFL. Slender right now, will have to add bulk to his frame for the NFL. Very solid overall pass protector, excellent foot movement and good arm/hand technique. Biggest issues are strength and working against power rushers. Average run blocker, moves very well but doesn’t have tremendous strength. Smart player, ideal fit for a zone-blocking scheme.

6. Ricky Wagner, Wisconsin (2nd)

Big, powerful player. Superb run blocker. Better pass protector than people seem to think; isn’t slow footed and moves well side to side. Biggest issues are technique in both run and pass blocking: doesn’t sustain blocks well and has trouble with quick technique pass rushers. Has the athletic ability to play either tackle in the NFL.

7. Brennan Williams, North Carolina (2nd)

Emerged from nowhere last year to get all sorts of positive attention. Very tall with a nice frame, shows good strength in every area of the game. Isn’t an elite athlete and has trouble moving his feet quickly, especially in pass protection, but is a very strong straight line blocker. Projects as a very good run blocking RT in the NFL.

8. Justin Pugh, Syracuse (2nd)

A stellar college player that people don’t seem high on for some reason. Much more slender than most OTs, but has a nice size frame and will get bigger in the NFL. Really excellent all around pass protector: good strength, very good technique, excellent footwork. Very solid power run blocker as well, can move linemen out of the way effectively or pull/get outside as required. Smart player, good reputation with coaches and teammates. No real weaknesses outside of smaller size. Could wind up rising quickly with a solid season.

9. Oday Aboushi, Virginia (2nd-3rd)

Another tall, slender OT. Will need to get bigger and stronger for the NFL. Very good athlete who moves very, very well. Technique in pass pro is generally solid. Very quick feet. Balance can be hit or miss. Not a great run blocker but works hard; more of an in line blocker than a downfield blocker. Consistency is an issue but has a great deal of talent.

10. Alex Hurst, LSU (3rd)

Big, very strong, great length and great hands. Elite in-line run blocker, sets the edge as well as anyone in CFB. Feet aren’t very quick, doesn’t get to the second level well but can lock up guys if he does get there. Pass pro is not a strength, relies mainly on initial punch instead of good footwork and technique. Projects as a RT or possibly an in-line guard, will probably take a bit to get up to speed on the NFL but has a lot of potential as a key run blocker.

11. John Wetzel, Boston College (3rd)

Ideal frame for the position; decent athlete, very hard worker. Very nice hands and arms, but footwork is below average in both pass and run blocking. Quickness is also below average, but long arms and strong hands help to compensate. Will be a developmental prospect but has the frame to be a blindside pass blocker in the NFL.

Others:

Brian Winters, Kent State: small school guy I’ve not seen; has really outstanding reputation but is undersized

Elvis Fisher, Mizzou: first round talent who has knees of tissue paper

Seantrel Henderson, Miami: colossal dude, once the top recruit in the country, could rise with a solid season

Cyril Richardson, Baylor: big athletic raw talent, may be guard in NFL

David Yankey, Stanford: tall, slender OT, good pass protector, experienced run blocker

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He's good but I'd rather get an impact defensive or offensive player. I think our tackles are fine, anyway. It's our interior that is the issue.

How long do you think Gross will play? Especially if we are in rebuild mode again. Not saying your wrong but you have to take that into consideration.

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