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Bwood

Say hello to your 2013 1st round draft pick

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Would rather trade down and get more draft picks, OT isn't a huge need and we could use more picks to fill holes.

That being said even if he was there after we trade down idk if I'd take him, he can be inconsistent at times.

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How does he compare to Matt Kalil? Clady? Long? Looks pretty weak in that pic.

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and whatever here are the guards

Offensive Guard:

Interesting class of guards: couple of elite prospects, then not much else. Very big class overall. Outside of the top 3-4 guys not a ton of talent.

1. Chance Warmack, Alabama (1st)

Amazing talent who has largely flown under the radar for most of his career. Already being called the best guard prospect ever; may be the best overall player in this class. Generally excellent athleticism, exceptional strength, outstanding technically. Rarely gets beaten in pass protection; best run blocker in CFB. Can fit into any scheme and excel. Hard worker and nasty disposition.

2. Barrett Jones, Alabama (1st)

One of the most interesting OL prospects to come along in a while. One of the smartest and most versatile OL prospects I’ve ever seen; has excelled in every OL position and in every role at each position. Currently playing center, but has the strength/power to play OG and the athleticism/technique to play OT in the NFL. Best fit might be as RT in the NFL, but he’s doing very well at C so far this year. Will be a very interesting player to watch.

3. Jonathan Cooper, North Carolina (1st-2nd)

Excellent agility and technical ability, especially as a run blocker. Outstanding technical pass blocker as well. Speed and mobility are top notch; size and strength are slightly below average but are still adequate. Looks like an ideal pulling guard or a fit for a zone blocking scheme to me.

4. Larry Warford, Kentucky (2nd)

Being compared to Warmack which is a pretty nice thing. Biggest guard in the class; may be a touch too heavy but still moves very well. Outstanding pass blocker and in-line run blocker. Mobility is good but isn’t elite; power is exceptional. Best fit in a power run game that needs guards to lock up DL.

5. Alvin Bailey, Arkansas (3rd)

Huge player, enormously strong and underrated quickness. Does a variety of roles in his system and is very versatile; may be considered for RT duties in the NFL. Mobility is adequate for a zone blocking scheme, power is adequate for in-line blocking. Only big question is his footwork and technique; a bit raw but is very talented.

6. Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State (3rd)

Physique is very impressive; looks like an elite OT and is very athletic. Mobility and quickness are as good as one would expect. Biggest issue is functional strength; has a lot of trouble with the big, strong interior linemen in the SEC and will struggle likewise in the NFL. Best fit for a zone scheme.

Others:

Travis Bond, North Carolina: huge and slow but very strong

Omoregie Uzzi, Georgia Tech: best name in the draft

John Sullen, Auburn: solid, experienced, limited athletically.

Spencer Long, Nebraska: slender frame, very good mobility, lot of upside.

Braden Hansen, BYU: experienced and well rounded, big frame, lacks elite strength

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What does that have to do with Canada? I'm Canadian and all I really watch is football

You guys are the root of all evil and curling. However, it was off set by the delish Canadian apple filling they brought down to make apple pies. Pies make everything better.

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Would rather trade down and get more draft picks, OT isn't a huge need

Actually offensive line is probably the worst unit on the team right now.

Even if Kalil was in there, you've still got two backup caliber players starting, and Gross is no longer what he was. They can't just leave him out there on an island.

A lot of it is coaching, in that for whatever reason no one with authority is thinking "hey maybe we should you know I don't know shift protection or chip block or some poo" but a lot of it is a spade being a spade.

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Here's another one that doesn't know talent.

You still haven't told us why that LT is so good besides "everyone else said he was good."

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Here's another one that doesn't know talent.

And you're a professional college football scout?

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One of the weaker OT classes we’ve seen in a while. That said, there are more LT prospects than usual, and teams looking to shore up pass protection will have a lot to choose from. Again, I think we’re seeing the effect of CFB moving to a more pass-happy plan; lots of lighter, quicker guys amongst this group, few maulers.

1. Luke Joeckel, A&M (1st)

Ideal mix of size and agility for the LT position in the NFL. Footwork is consistently excellent as is balance. Can deal effectively with both speed and power rushers. Only knock in pass protection is on his hand technique. Is just an above average run blocker but has good technique and general awareness. Polished and heady player. Well regarded by coaches and teammates except for his noodle arms.

Even his teammates think so.

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i bet he doesnt even lift.

tiny ass arms, no thanks.

I'm pretty sure he lifts.

Just a hunch.

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