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The Success of Chip Kelly. The New Old School


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[quote name='Gucci Mane' timestamp='1352987928' post='2000611']
Do yall not realize that the reason Chip Kelly is having so much success is because he recruits on speed and if your slowest guy on offense is still faster than the fastest guy on defense, you are going to have a ton of success at the college level. Especially against PAC defenses.

I'm not taking anything away from Chip as a coach. He is fantastic. But dont think the second he comes into the NFL that hes gonna have our Offense busting defenses wide open and turning every play into a track meet. NFL defenses are too fast and too disciplined to fail.
[/quote]
it's not the speed of the players. it's the speed of his system. he runs a hurry up no huddle offense, but he holds the whole team to it.

he manages everything at a killer pace and he's also smarter than most coaches.

if you think it's just because he recruits fast players then you aren't paying attention.

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Has Kelly had significant NFL experience like Harbaugh and Carroll. If so then he could be a good choice. If not, then we don't need to be his first stop where he learns what to do. We need a proven guy who can run with the tools he has got not experiment and try to figure it out.
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[quote name='Gucci Mane' timestamp='1352987928' post='2000611']
Do yall not realize that the reason Chip Kelly is having so much success is because he recruits on speed and if your slowest guy on offense is still faster than the fastest guy on defense, you are going to have a ton of success at the college level. Especially against PAC defenses.

I'm not taking anything away from Chip as a coach. He is fantastic. But dont think the second he comes into the NFL that hes gonna have our Offense busting defenses wide open and turning every play into a track meet. NFL defenses are too fast and too disciplined to fail.
[/quote]


I been coming around on the Chip Kelly bandwagon for some time now and boy I think he can be a great coach. The reason why is because he is very intelligent and game plans like no one else. I was watching something on him and they asked him why don't he run more pro style plays. His reaction was, if he had the personnel to do so they would be in the power I all game. This let me know that he is able to understand things like that. I think the Panthers will be the best fit for but I don't know if Jerry Richardson will want him.
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i'm glad someone else saw this article, btw. i read it yesterday and while i might have been leaning his direction before, i'm sold now.

the thing that really caught me was this....
[quote]
Since Kelly became Oregon's offensive coordinator in 2007 and its head coach in 2009, the incredible statistics and daunting record rolled up by the Ducks has been largely credited to Kelly's famed spread offense. This season Oregon is 10-0, fourth in the country in rushing, second in total yards, and first in scoring with [url="http://www.cfbstats.com/2012/team/529/index.html"]more than 54 points per game[/url]. The most common explanation for this success is Kelly's up-tempo, no-huddle approach and the theory that [url="http://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2012/10/08/patriots-huddle-relies-power-one/nHTapuVnBOwfFlffwTrN6J/story.html"]simply running plays quickly[/url] is what transforms a good offense into a great one. There's an element of truth to this — the no-huddle is undeniably key to Oregon's identity — but the explanation is incomplete. Oregon doesn't use its fastest tempo all the time, and the [url="http://smartfootball.com/offense/the-future-of-the-nfl-more-up-tempo-no-huddle"]benefits of the no-huddle[/url] go well beyond those 60 electrifying minutes on Saturdays.

Kelly's anecdote about his old high school team suggests another possibility. Chip Kelly's offense works not because it's a gimmick, but because rather than choose sides between old and new, Kelly's teams straddle history. Oregon is successful because it does well what good teams have always done well, albeit with a slightly more modern wardrobe.
"We spread the defense so they will declare their defensive look for the offensive linemen," Kelly explained at that same clinic. "The more offensive personnel we put in the box, the more defenders the defense will put in there, and it becomes a cluttered mess." Twenty years ago, Kelly's high school coach ran the unbalanced, two–tight end power-I, so he could execute old-school, fundamental football and run the ball down his opponent's throat. Today, Kelly spreads the defense and operates out of an up-tempo no-huddle so he can do the exact same thing.

Every coach has to ask himself the same question: 'What do you want to be?'" Kelly said [url="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1606792180/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1606792180&linkCode=as2&tag=chrisbrownsfo-20"]at a recent clinic[/url]. "That is the great thing about football. You can be anything you want. You can be a spread team, I-formation team, power team, wing-T team, option team, or wishbone team. You can be anything you want, but you have to define it." That definition is evident in Oregon. Kelly's choice of a no-huddle spread offense drips from every corner of the impressive practice facilities in Eugene. [b]Oregon does not run a no-huddle offense so much as they are a no-huddle [i]program[/i].[/b]

[i][b]For all of the hype surrounding Oregon games, Oregon practices might be even better. Oregon practices are filled with blaring music and players sprinting from drill to drill. Coaches interact with players primarily through whistles, air horns, and semi-communicative grunts. Operating under the constraint of NCAA-imposed practice time limits, Kelly's sessions are designed around one thing: [url="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/sports/ncaafootball/02oregon.html?pagewanted=all"]maximizing time[/url]. Kelly's solution is simple: The practice field is for repetitions. Traditional "coaching" — correcting mistakes, showing a player how to step one way or another, or lecturing on this or that football topic — is better served in the film room.[/b][/i]

The up-tempo, no-huddle offense ends up benefiting in practice as much as it does in games. Without time wasted huddling, players get many more practice repetitions, leading to increased efficiency on Saturdays. As Sam Snead once said, "practice is putting brains in your muscles," and Oregon's up-tempo practices are all about making Kelly's system second nature.
When the games do begin, there's no question that the no-huddle makes Oregon's attack more dangerous, but it's a common misconception that they have only one supersonic speed. [b]The Ducks use plenty of their superfast tempo, but they actually have three settings: red light (slow, quarterback looks to sideline for guidance while the coach can signal in a new play), [i][u]yellow light (medium speed, quarterback calls the play and can make his own audibles at the line[/u][/i], including various check-with-me plays), and green light (superfast).[/b]

[b]This [i]change[/i] of pace is actually how Oregon constantly keeps defenses off balance. If they only went one pace the entire game the offense would actually be easier to defend. When the defense lines up quickly and is set, Kelly takes his time and picks the perfect play. When the defense is desperate to substitute or identify Oregon's formation, the Ducks sprint to the line and rip off two, three, or four plays in a row — and it rarely takes more than that for them to score.[/b]
[/quote]i have been hearing and reading that NFL execs and insiders have been saying that kelly runs the best practices of anyone they've seen and not a one of them has said that what he does in games or in practices wouldn't work.

i think that if he were given more time with the players and was given more mature and experienced players to work with, that he could absolutely do in the pros what he does at the college level.

it's the philosophy, the creativity, the management skills, and his intelligence that has won me over. the lack of NFL experience would only be there for the first year or two. again, if he had a staff made up of NFL experienced coaches i think he would be fine in that regard.
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[quote name='Bj-Monster23' timestamp='1352991108' post='2000661']
I been coming around on the Chip Kelly bandwagon for some time now and boy I think he can be a great coach. The reason why is because he is very intelligent and game plans like no one else. I was watching something on him and they asked him why don't he run more pro style plays. [b]His reaction was, if he had the personnel to do so they would be in the power I all game.[/b] This let me know that he is able to understand things like that. I think the Panthers will be the best fit for but I don't know if Jerry Richardson will want him.
[/quote]
the system or at least the play selection he uses in oregon he uses not because that's all he can do, but because it's the easiest and most effective for his players to learn in limited time.

given more time and better players we would be seeing a whole lot more.

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[quote name='panthers55' timestamp='1352991081' post='2000660']
Has Kelly had significant NFL experience like Harbaugh and Carroll. If so then he could be a good choice. If not, then we don't need to be his first stop where he learns what to do. We need a proven guy who can run with the tools he has got not experiment and try to figure it out.
[/quote]
i'd rather have a guy with college HC experience over a OC or DC from the pro level without HC experience.

i really don't think that a lack of NFL experience is going to hamper his ability to be effective as a coach at the NFL level. i don't think that's the case for everyone.

the more i've been looking into this guy, the more i've been convinced that he'd be a success at any level.

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[quote name='acrasia' timestamp='1352980598' post='2000544']
If we hire Chip Kelly became our head coach, is he going to bring his OC to keep running the
same offensive style now, because who ever becomes the next OC he is going to install his
own offense not Chip's. Unless he desides to become the OC [i]and[/i] HC.
[/quote]
chip kelly is his own OC. kind of like sean payton and other coaches who handle the playcalling.

he'd have an OC to help implement things in practices and who would work as an advisor or whatever, but i think he'd handle it the way he does in oregon basically because he's smarter than anyone else he would have calling plays.

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[quote name='rayzor' timestamp='1352991549' post='2000670']
the system or at least the play selection he uses in oregon he uses not because that's all he can do, but because it's the easiest and most effective for his players to learn in limited time.

given more time and better players we would be seeing a whole lot more.
[/quote]

I agree.

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I am intrigued. Not having any NFL experience at all tempers it a great deal though.

To keep it in perspective, the huddle anointed Rivera the next best thing. Now look where we are.
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[quote name='TheRed' timestamp='1352992415' post='2000700']
I am intrigued. Not having any NFL experience at all tempers it a great deal though.

To keep it in perspective, the huddle anointed Rivera the next best thing. Now look where we are.
[/quote]i think we tried to sell ourselves on him after we found out what the pool of potential HCs consisted of and then after he was hired.

i know i did.

jim harbaugh was who i wanted more than anyone. i'm finding myself just as much on the chip kelly bandwagon as i was on the harbaugh one.

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I would love for him to come here, I would donate a testicle to science for it. Period.

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Chip Kelly scares the hell out of me...but not in that good roller-coaster kinda way. He scares me in the "this is probably going to explode and take off your arm" kinda way.

I don't feel like we, as a franchise, are in a place where we can absorb bringing in a guy who runs a spread offense with no NFL experience and hope he can make the leap. I expect we're going to take a risk with whoever we hire because I do not expect a big name ex NFL HC to end up here but there are things that can be done to mitigate that risk. Not hiring someone who both runs a college style offense and has no NFL experience are two big things you can do help that mitigation.

Chip Kelly might make someone a great offensive head coach, and if he does good for him and that franchise. If we did bring him in I would do exactly like I did Rivera and find every possibly good thing about him I could find and sell myself on the hire to the best of my ability...he'd have my full support. But he's not the right choice for us right now IMO.
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