Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The Success of Chip Kelly. The New Old School

New Coach Panthers Spread Fail ?

  • Please log in to reply
120 replies to this topic

#76 TheRed

TheRed

    California Dreamin'

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,124 posts
  • LocationCharlotte, NC

Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:33 PM

i think we tried to sell ourselves on him after we found out what the pool of potential HCs consisted of and then after he was hired.

i know i did.

jim harbaugh was who i wanted more than anyone. i'm finding myself just as much on the chip kelly bandwagon as i was on the harbaugh one.


Well most looked past his obvious red flags and hoped for the best. All those interviews he was passed over for, being fired from the Bears then taking a lesser position with the Chargers before becoming a DC again.

I'm not willing to wait several more years if the next coach is a bust, and I'm sure nobody else here is either.

I too wanted Harbaugh, but unlike Kelly he atleast had history at this level already. Any coaching hire is taking a chance, but after being burned by Fox and now this staff, we can't not be vigilant and not look at all the angles.

#77 rayzor

rayzor

    shula is who i thought he was.

  • Moderators
  • 29,563 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:34 PM

i thought this was interesting. kelly was a huge influence over some changes made by the patriots this year.
from a boston globe article. http://www.bostonglo...rN6J/story.html

If you want to see what’s next on the pro level, look to the colleges. That’s what Belichick does, with his alliances with coaches such as Nick Saban (LSU and Alabama), Urban Meyer (Florida and Ohio State) and, now, Kelly.

That’s why when Kelly walked into Gillette Stadium two years ago — and he’s been there three times total — ears perked up among the Patriots’ coaches, including Belichick.

Kelly had become friendly with former Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien while both were rising in the college ranks. The UNH coaching staff would visit Brown, where O’Brien was coaching, for pickup basketball games and to talk X’s and O’s.
Kelly told the Patriots he was moving to a no-huddle that only used one word to signify everything involved in a play.

Sideline calls take too long. Wristbands too.

One word is all that is needed.
“The things they’re doing now, they’re even faster,” Dickson said. “They have things where they can call one thing and it’s going to tell them formation, plays, everything, and all you have to see is coverage.”

The collective Patriots’ response to Kelly’s assertion was, basically, “You run an entire offense like that? How do you get the players to comprehend that?”

Kelly declined to be interviewed, but those with knowledge of the discussion said Kelly laid out his rationale.
Players memorize thousands of words in songs, hundreds of movie lines, and many other things involving pop culture.

Why can’t players have instant recall of a handful of concepts? Heck, everybody knows No. 2 on a McDonald’s menu gets you a Quarter Pounder, medium fries, and a drink.

“It’s kind of easy,” Dickson said. “It comes with repetition. A lot of guys learn different. Myself, I just needed to be out there repping those plays. The more comfortable you get, the faster you’ll go. He wants to make it easier to where you’re not thinking about anything, you’re just going fast. Make it as simple as guys can learn it so you can go really fast. That’s the key, making it simple for your players so they can play at top speed.”

Kelly’s overall message to the Patriots: Don’t put a limit on your players’ minds; they will learn whatever you teach them.
“I was interested to hear how he did it,” Belichick said. “I would say he expanded it to a different level and it was very interesting to understand what he was doing. Certainly I’ve learned a lot from talking to Chip about his experiences with it and how he does it and his procedure and all that.”



#78 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:43 PM

I don't get it. We are trying to get rid of a coach who thought he could revolutionize the league with the read option offense, and now you guys want to bring in a guy who specializes in it? Am I missing something here?

#79 rayzor

rayzor

    shula is who i thought he was.

  • Moderators
  • 29,563 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:46 PM

just another thing i saw for those who think that kelly's pigeonholed himself into one particular style of offense (though i don't think he appropriately placed credit, but the comparison is still appropriate)

How much would you have to change your offense? Or does it translate to the NFL?:
“I think some does. No one can be married to one thing, because it’s all personnel-driven. You can say, ‘Hey, we’re going to do this.’ It’s like the Denver Broncos. What John Fox did in Denver with The Golden Calf of Bristol was outstanding because he looked at what he had for a player and said, ‘Hey, we’re going to run this.’ Now, all of a sudden, they have Peyton Manning and they’re not going to run the same plays. … It’s a personnel-driven game and I think the coaches that are the best at it can adapt their systems to the NFL.”
http://sportsradioin...tate-tampa-bay/

he's a smart enough coach to know you can't do the same thing everywhere with every team and expect the same results. "It's a personnel-driven game" says it all.

he runs whatever style of spread there because it works with what he has and it's simple for the players to pick up.

the thing is married to, though, and that is at the core of his whole coaching style isn't in the scheme, but in the philosophy. it's a no huddle, hurry up offense that's built on speed between snaps and pace of game and the aggressiveness of his playcalling.

that is the thing that sets him above everyone else. his offensive scheme will adapt to the personnel he has, but the tempo will remain the same.

#80 rayzor

rayzor

    shula is who i thought he was.

  • Moderators
  • 29,563 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:52 PM

I don't get it. We are trying to get rid of a coach who thought he could revolutionize the league with the read option offense, and now you guys want to bring in a guy who specializes in it? Am I missing something here?

if you think that's what he specializes in or is the only thing he specializes in then your missing the boat.

the thing that has killed chud hasn't been him running any particular offense. it's been in him limiting the offense and making it predictable. i mean one thing that is crucial to kelly's offense is the ability of the QB to make audibles on the line. is chud allowing that? kelly's whole offense depends on him and his QBs ability to take advantage of defenses and control what they do. they adapt what they do on the fly and abuse the other team and the pace of game gives the defense very little time to adjust or make necessary personnel changes.

chud goes in with one game plan and makes no adjustments and allows for no changes. he's smart, but very narrow minded in his playcalling.

chip kelly is in a whole other league than chud.

#81 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:02 PM

if you think that's what he specializes in or is the only thing he specializes in then your missing the boat.

the thing that has killed chud hasn't been him running any particular offense. it's been in him limiting the offense and making it predictable. i mean one thing that is crucial to kelly's offense is the ability of the QB to make audibles on the line. is chud allowing that? kelly's whole offense depends on him and his QBs ability to take advantage of defenses and control what they do. they adapt what they do on the fly and abuse the other team and the pace of game gives the defense very little time to adjust or make necessary personnel changes.

chud goes in with one game plan and makes no adjustments and allows for no changes. he's smart, but very narrow minded in his playcalling.

chip kelly is in a whole other league than chud.


I just rather have a guy who specializes in a pro formation. If Chip Kelly is successful with the read option offense, which depends upon an athletic QB, he will be the first. I think that is a long shot. A team has never won a superbowl, with a QB who is pure athletic. Chip would probably come in and see Cam as mostly athletic with a big arm, just like I think most coaches would see him, and try to utilize them instead of developing Cam into a real QB.

I don't want to take no chances. Give me a coach who runs a pro system. I'm tired of all the experiments, it's time Cam learn to be a passer.

#82 rayzor

rayzor

    shula is who i thought he was.

  • Moderators
  • 29,563 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:07 PM

the spread is a pro system.

usage by many pro teams make is so, even if it doesn't have the name "pro-style".

and thinking that kelly would be exclusively a "read option" offense guy would be short sighted. that's what he runs there, but that's not all he's limited to.

#83 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,905 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:13 PM

the spread is a pro system.

usage by many pro teams make is so, even if it doesn't have the name "pro-style".

and thinking that kelly would be exclusively a "read option" offense guy would be short sighted. that's what he runs there, but that's not all he's limited to.


In the articles you posted, he said himself he would run a system that is fitted to his personnel. (Using John Fox and The Golden Calf of Bristol as an example) I'm 1,000,000% sure he would also try to use the read option, if he got his hands on Cam. Yet like I said, I don't want to take any chances, let Cam learn to be a passer, because that is where he is still struggling. No team right now is respecting his passing ability. Yeah, Chud has a lot to do with that, but it seems Chud doesn't trust Cam for some reason. Is that because Cam is struggling to read and throw in practice, or is Chud just crazy? It could be a little bit of both, but Cam struggling to throw with accuracy is what I'm concerned with. Give me a coach that demands that of Cam, and put all those read options in the garbage can.

#84 TonyN

TonyN

    MEMBER

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 312 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:18 PM

the spread is a pro system.

usage by many pro teams make is so, even if it doesn't have the name "pro-style".

and thinking that kelly would be exclusively a "read option" offense guy would be short sighted. that's what he runs there, but that's not all he's limited to.



Still waiting..".Rayzor"...lol...

the more you type the more you out yourself...

You have absolutlely no idea what you are talking about and your posts prove it beyont the shadow of a doubt....

#85 Actionman0z

Actionman0z

    Strong Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,777 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:33 PM

You dont need to have played in the league to be a good coach. I think Kelly has enough desire, and ingenuity to take what we have and maximize the talent. He schemes well, and runs practice well. I think he'd be a great fit. So the fact that he runs the spread is not an argument.

What I do not like is the fact that he is not very media friendly, and I dont know how he would handle the responsibilities that a pro coach has to do as far as getting out there and being in the public for all the media time and events and such. I want him more than anything, but I live 60 miles from Eugene, and I've been a die hard duck fan, and season ticket holder for years.

#86 JawnyBlaze

JawnyBlaze

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,043 posts

Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:48 PM

HC experience > NFL experience

My biggest requirement for our next coach is that he was a successful Head Coach.

#87 Jackofalltrades

Jackofalltrades

    OWN the Line of Scrimmage

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,746 posts
  • LocationNC

Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:43 AM

HC experience > NFL experience

My biggest requirement for our next coach is that he was a successful Head Coach.


Like Saban, Petrino, etc...

#88 JawnyBlaze

JawnyBlaze

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,043 posts

Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:43 AM

Sure, in order to avoid situations like Rivera, Singletary, Phillips, etc. There's cases to be made for coordinators or college HCs. We tried the coordinator route. This time I'd try someone that doesn't have to learn to manage a team and the game.

#89 jtnc

jtnc

    Resident Asshole

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,078 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:10 AM

Still waiting..".Rayzor"...lol...

the more you type the more you out yourself...

You have absolutlely no idea what you are talking about and your posts prove it beyont the shadow of a doubt....

The same could be said for you, posting your own stats while ignoring others and FACTS is denial.



#90 rayzor

rayzor

    shula is who i thought he was.

  • Moderators
  • 29,563 posts

Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:26 AM

You dont need to have played in the league to be a good coach. I think Kelly has enough desire, and ingenuity to take what we have and maximize the talent. He schemes well, and runs practice well. I think he'd be a great fit. So the fact that he runs the spread is not an argument.

What I do not like is the fact that he is not very media friendly, and I dont know how he would handle the responsibilities that a pro coach has to do as far as getting out there and being in the public for all the media time and events and such. I want him more than anything, but I live 60 miles from Eugene, and I've been a die hard duck fan, and season ticket holder for years.

this would absolutely be the least of my concerns.



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Contact Us: info@carolinahuddle.com - IP Content Design by Joshua Tree / TitansReport.