Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Lumps

Do you believe suicides go to hell?

44 posts in this topic

Tough question. I'm not religious, never go to church outside of weddings/ funerals, and dont believe in heaven and hell.

Could there be some afterlife? Absolutely. Ive always found it interesting that every single person on the planet (outside of psychopaths) has a moral compass. Sure, its different for every person depending on your life, but every person feels a sense of right and wrong from their actions, completely independent of what other people think.

Maybe its just a funny little quirk of humanity, but it feels like more to me. Like your actions have some sort of bigger meaning. What it means I have no idea.

Dont know if this was helpful, but good luck. Remember to enjoy those fleeting moments we call life

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just one small, minor issue with Christian churches- not a single one of them has any belief or value system which advocates suicide. This is partly a faith-based belief and also a business decision. It's pretty hard to get your donations or gifts if you're dead.

That being said, I do believe in everything that Jack Kervorkian did to help those pass gracefully without the medical trauma, in their own home with their loved ones close by.

I don't know. I've thought about the whole suicide thing a lot over the years- it's always in the back of your mind somehow when you're the product of a bi-polar mother...back in the 60's when "bi-polar" got you a few days in the local hospital whenever the moon changed.

Seriously, have you thought about how you'd carry it out? Who are you going to tell? Who's going to clean up the aftermath (doesn't matter how you do it, there's always a mess and someone will have to handle you). What really is your medical situation? Is it terminal or is the medical money machine simply going to treat symptoms with no intention of treating the problem?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This board is probably not a good place to ask

actually, if you're going to ask on a sports board, this place would be better than 95 percent of any boards I know of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a Christian, I first want to express sadness for the position you are in. I would hate to think of leaving my son and others. I work now to provide them with security upon my departure. I have never wanted to consider never seeing them again and the whole "life" thing ending with no legacy, footprint or difference made.

I do not think suicide is some unforgiveable sin. Not what the bible teaches anyway. Not sure why you would ask about hell if it is not in your belief system. Just think someone besides other agnostics might be good for a few conversations. Would not go to the local screaming fire and brimstone types.

Christianity not based on who can yell the loudest. Personally don't think it ends at bodily expiration.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would seek the advice help of a church you are familiar with. I would attend a service and/or seek an appointment with a priest. Or if your not comfortable doing that yourself, then i am sure you have a friend or family member who is a Christian who can help you with this.

I am not a priest, but I do believe it is the duty of every Christian to spread the word of God...

Life belongs to God. It is never our place to take our own life or someone else's life.

"Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own, you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body" (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).

The solution to despair and hopelessness is not suicide, but faith in God.

"We wait in hope for the LORD; he is our help and our shield. In him our hearts rejoice, for we trust in his holy name. May your unfailing love rest upon us, O LORD, even as we put our hope in you" (Psalms 33:20-22).

http://www.christiananswers.net/q-dml/dml-y038.html

If you want to talk, PM me your number.

Thus sayeth Boner Champ.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have HBO On Demand the documentary HOW TO DIE IN OREGON may still be available. It was still there in October. The PBS documentary already mentioned is good, but this one is a must see for those contemplating such an important issue.

HOW TO DIE IN OREGON explores the complexities of the aid-in-dying debate, interviewing doctors on both sides of the issue, as well as activists, patients' families and opinion-makers such as journalist and author Derek Humphry, who wrote the bestselling suicide handbook "Final Exit" and founded the Hemlock Society USA, which aims to decriminalize voluntary euthanasia nationwide. The film also travels to Washington state, where Seattle activist Nancy Niedzielski campaigns for that state's Death with Dignity Act following her husband's slow and painful death from brain cancer. Washington voters passed the law in 2008.

In 1994, Oregon became the first state in the U.S. to legalize physician aid-in-dying. At the time, only two countries (Switzerland and the Netherlands) permitted the practice, but more than 500 Oregonians have since ended their life using the law.

At the heart of HOW TO DIE IN OREGON are the patients, families and friends who grapple with the state's legal option of physician aid-in-dying. Among the stories the film tells is that of Cody Curtis, a 54-year-old wife and mother who suffers heroically through a roller coaster of emotions and on-again, off-again symptoms stemming from cancer of the liver, symptoms as debilitating as they are humiliating. After initial surgery seems successful, the cancer returns, prompting Curtis to legally obtain the lethal barbiturates to hold "in reserve" as a final option. "It's very comforting to know they are here," she says. "It's my choice when to take them and whether to take them."

http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/how-to-die-in-oregon/synopsis.html#/documentaries/how-to-die-in-oregon/synopsis.html

A review of the documentary

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/movies/25sundance.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scared what the answers would be if this thread was changed from suiciders to masturbators!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm typically one of those folks that's particularly hard on people who take their lives. I see it as the last and maybe greatest attention whoring act of a coward.

But that's when it's an act of emotion.

But when the decision is made by God/The Universe/Fate or whatever you believe in, we'll that's a different story. I don't think that there is anything wrong with simply hastening that which is imminate. There is no nobility in enduring a long and difficult passing.

As someone who believes in God I can't reconcile the idea of any "Go to Jail, Go directly to Jail. Do not pass Go" with the idea of a just and loving deity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, the asshole in me just has to ask...

If someone commits suicide, and there is an omnipotent god, then said god willed suicide to happen... no?

Religious folk will be the first to tell you that everything happens for a reason, until something like suicide happens, and then they'll immediately pass judgement...

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever gets you through the night is alright, ultimately everyone must decide for themselves.

The way I look at it is, there is no scientific evidence of a cognizant existence prior to conception (a truly preconceived notion) or postmortem.

It is estimated there have been approximately 100 billion modern humans born, all but 7 billion are now dead. Haven't run into one wayward soul yet.

I wouldn't be the least bit upset if I were wrong, but wishing it was true is simply not enough for me,

However, if I am right, I'll be as equally preoccupied with this issue after death, as I was before I was born.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever gets you through the night is alright, ultimately everyone must decide for themselves.

The way I look at it is, there is no scientific evidence of a cognizant existence prior to conception (a truly preconceived notion) or postmortem.

It is estimated there have been approximately 100 billion modern humans born, all but 7 billion are now dead. Haven't run into one wayward soul yet.

I wouldn't be the least bit upset if I were wrong, but wishing it was true is simply not enough for me,

However, if I am right, I'll be as equally preoccupied with this issue after death, as I was before I was born.

How exactly could science prove or disprove such and existence?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How exactly could science prove or disprove such and existence?

Advocates of fanciful ideas ultimately resort to "It can not be proved or disproved."

By the standard of "you can't prove it doesn't exist", we would need to include things such as vampires, werewolves, leprechauns, trolls, monsters under the bed, and any other fanciful idea that pops into anyone's head.

Ask anyone that believes in something fanciful and it ultimately comes down to "faith".

There is a total lack of verifiable evidence for an after life, just like for monsters under the bed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites