Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Good read for about

15 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

a half dozen or so here.

the rest can go back to Dancing with the Stars and save the TLDR, or go ahead and post it so you feel a part

Pstall, D Deac and maybe a couple others.

What is your sense of his opinions? Brazil rather than Europe?

http://prudentbear.com/index.php/thebearslairview?art_id=10727

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I confess to being less than adroit on the topic of financial systems and mechanisms outside of philosophy, but most of what I see here is "now that obummer is elected we're gonna turn into a third-world banana republic, if only noted fiscal conservative mitt romney had won we could've reinstituted the conservative budgets of the reagan years"

or maybe I can't read

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='PhillyB' timestamp='1353399992' post='2009331']
or maybe I can't read
[/quote]

Let's have a poll. I'm going with this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='PhillyB' timestamp='1353399992' post='2009331']
I confess to being less than adroit on the topic of financial systems and mechanisms outside of philosophy, but most of what I see here is "now that obummer is elected we're gonna turn into a third-world banana republic, if only noted fiscal conservative mitt romney had won we could've reinstituted the conservative budgets of the reagan years"

or maybe I can't read
[/quote]

Think you wasted time reading. You could have just gone ahead and posted.

Actually, he says it started will before "obummer" as you say. Next time just do the normal TLDR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Actually a pretty good read. Not sure I really see the similarities to Brazil, or the cause and effect for some of his arguments- this part about immigration for instance

[quote]
Since 2000, weak management has allowed the U.S. competitive advantage to erode. Fiscal and monetary laxity has drained the U.S. capital base, an advantage similar to the cash hordes of Microsoft, Google and Apple. The country’s integrity has slipped; from 16th place on Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index in 2011, with a score of 7.6, the country had slipped to 24th place in 2011, with a score of 7.1. Similarly, heavy immigration created a society with permanently high unemployment (when those “not in the workforce” are included) and inequality at a level the country had only briefly touched before, in the late 1920s. The result has been an 8% decline in median real wages, mostly in the recession since 2007 but continuing in the most recent years when growth had nominally resumed.

This is why calls for the Republicans to abandon their opposition to immigration controls are especially misguided. High-skill immigration in moderation is highly beneficial to the economy. But very heavy immigration, even of the highly skilled, depresses job prospects and earnings for those in professions especially subject to it—which is why median earnings for college-trained software engineers are lower than those for college-trained lawyers, where professional restrictions to immigration apply. Mass low-skilled immigration, legal or illegal, inevitably puts pressure on living standards at the bottom of the scale. The barber in Boston is paid more than the barber in Bangalore because he benefits from geographical proximity to rich neighbors, but if large numbers of immigrant barbers move to Boston, his wages will decline towards the global norm.
[/quote]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I never cease to be amazed at how many seemingly intelligent and well educated people want to try to reduce the ridiculously complex system that is this nations economy down to something that can be "fixed" with something as simple as the choice of who sits behind the desk at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.




The politics of distraction hard at work...
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='Inimicus' timestamp='1353419621' post='2009437']
I never cease to be amazed at how many seemingly intelligent and well educated people want to try to reduce the ridiculously complex system that is this nations economy down to something that can be "fixed" with something as simple as the choice of who sits behind the desk at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.




The politics of distraction hard at work...
[/quote]

To be fair, he states his assumptions at the beginning-
[quote]President Obama’s victory clarifies the political and economic landscape. Unfettered in his second term, he will now be able to pursue the economic policies he truly favors[/quote]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='thatlookseasy' timestamp='1353419753' post='2009442']

To be fair, he states his assumptions at the beginning-
[/quote]


But that assumption is based on the idea that just because Obama held his seat and doesn't have to run for reelection that it somehow imbues him with the ability to get his ideas codified into law by a congress that has shown zero inclination to just write him a blank check.

At the end of the day what the president (any president) thinks or wants in regards to the economy will always be hindered by the fact that he will have to work with congress. Even in that case where his party holds the majority its still a body made up of a variety of competing interests that thinks fast tracking is dealing with something in less than 2 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Think the overall is that Obama will continue a slide that began well before him, but at an increasing rate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='stirs' timestamp='1353423058' post='2009493']
Think the overall is that Obama will continue a slide that began well before him, but at an increasing rate
[/quote]


I get that.


What I don't get is how someone who seems as intelligent as the author can miss the bigger issue that it wouldn't matter who the president is. There is enough inertia and partisanship at this point that simply changing the (figure)head of state is not nearly the panacea (or deathknell) that its being portrayed as.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

"unfettered in his second term"

unless you consider the republican majority in the house and thin, non-filibuster proof democratic majority in the senate. any agenda that obama has is going to be tempered by the republicans at the absolute least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote][color=#333333][font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif][size=3]In addition, the presence of large numbers of immigrants puts pressure on the political system to adapt to the norms they are used to. In the United States of 1900, this did not happen; first generation immigrants were forced to assimilate to U.S. norms, and given little political power until they had abandoned the collectivist nostrums of their home countries. However, today we rightly assimilate less brutally and encourage immigrants to preserve much of their home cultures.[/size][/font][/color][/quote]

Link?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites