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Kurb

Am I going crazy/Strange Concerns... (Prepping)

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it is near a fault line

.....................

The Brunswick plant is built near a fault line that runs along the Carolinas coast from Charleston, S.C.,Hughes says.

http://www.bizjourna...lt-on-same.html

.......................

Almost 25 General Electric-designed nuclear reactors in the United States are very similar to reactors in Japan threatened with a catastrophic meltdown.

The 23 American reactors in 13 states are GE boiling-water reactors with GE's Mark I systems for containing radioactivity, the same containment system used by the reactors in trouble at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, according to a Nuclear Regulatory Commission database that MSNBC accessed.

In addition, 12 American reactors in seven states have the later Mark II or Mark III containment system from GE.

An explosion occurred Monday at a second reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi facility, following Saturday’s explosion at another reactor there, and engineers are desperately trying to stave off a meltdown of the reactor cores.

The six reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant are all GE-designed boiling-water reactors, according to the anti-nuclear advocacy group Nuclear Information and Resources Service (NIRS).

The group says that five have containment systems of GE's Mark I design, and the sixth is a Mark II design. They were placed in operation between 1971 and 1979.

The Mark I has design problems, the NIRS has said.

"Some modifications have been made to U.S. Mark I reactors since 1986, although the fundamental design deficiencies remain," the NIRS said.

The following 23 U.S. plants have GE boiling-water reactors (GE models 2, 3 or 4) with the same Mark I containment design used at Fukushima, according to the NRC online database:

  • Browns Ferry 1, Athens, Ala., operating license since 1973, reactor type GE 4
  • Browns Ferry 2, Athens, Ala., 1974, GE 4
  • Browns Ferry 3, Athens, Ala., 1976, GE 4
  • Brunswick 1, Southport, N.C, 1976, GE 4.
  • Brunswick 2, Southport, N.C., 1974, GE 4.
  • Cooper, Brownville, Neb., 1974, GE 4.
  • Dresden 2, Morris, Ill., 1970, GE 3.
  • Dresden 3, Morris, Ill., 1971, GE 3.
  • Duane Arnold, Palo, Iowa, 1974, GE 4.
  • Fermi 2, Monroe, Mich., 1985, GE 4.
  • FitzPatrick, Scriba, N.Y., 1974, GE 4.
  • Hatch 1, Baxley, Ga., 1974, GE 4.
  • Hatch 2, Baxley, Ga., 1978, GE 4.
  • Hope Creek, Hancock's Bridge, N.J. 1986, GE 4.
  • Monticello, Monticello, Minn., 1970, GE 3.
  • Nine Mile Point 1, Scriba, N.Y., 1969, GE 2.
  • Oyster Creek, Forked River, N.J., 1969, GE 2.
  • Peach Bottom 2, Delta, Pa., 1973, GE 4.
  • Peach Bottom 3, Delta, Pa., 1974, GE 4.
  • Pilgrim, Plymouth, Mass., 1972, GE 3.
  • Quad Cities 1, Cordova, Ill., 1972, GE 3.
  • Quad Cities 2, Moline, Ill., 1972, GE 3.
  • Vermont Yankee, Vernon, Vt., 1972, GE 4.

Read Latest Breaking News from Newsmax.com http://www.newsmax.c...7#ixzz2EE6UdDi0

Looked into this a bit... here's a seismic hazard map for NC/SC

northcarolina_haz.jpg

Granted this is for a very short time period, but all quakes since 1973 and they're all very, very small... would hardly feel one if it hit here.

northcarolina.jpg

The largest quake on record in NC is from 1916 in Waynesville and it was a mag 5.6, which is pretty substantial... but a long way from Southport. The large quake in Charleston in 1886 was a 7.3, which is huge, but also a long distance from Southport, but we'd definitely feel that.

Here's a map of quake epicenters from a larger period, 1698 to 1997... the largest in our area are in the 2-4 range, which is very minor...

sequake.gif

I did find a fault map, but it's in shapefile format and I'll have to dl it and make a map... will try and do later...

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Speaking of which. There was a 2.5 earthquake in eastern Tennessee yesterday. I felt it in my office, did anyone else?

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Guest Tom Cat

yes I realize that...the original statement was that these facilities are designed to safe themselves in the event of a power outage...we didn't discuss abnormal situations like flooding, terrorism and other catastrophic failures. My comment was aimed at total power failure only

Im not seeing your point - total power failure let to the Fukushima explosions - who cares how they got there?

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Speaking of which. There was a 2.5 earthquake in eastern Tennessee yesterday. I felt it in my office, did anyone else?

That was just your vibrator you felt.

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Guest Tom Cat

Biscuit -

I appreciate your work on this - Ive been in the area for over 20 years and there have been a lot of unexplained rumblings here over the years - Add those to a reactor design that was poor to begin with, a plant that was shoddily constructed over 40 years ago and has been bubble gum and bailing wired together over the years to meet faults the NRC happened to find and recently given permisiion to continue operations for 20 more years - Its hard for me to feel all warm and fuzzy.

For something else to chew on

..................................

The document also cited analyses by Duke Energy, owner of the Oconee Nuclear Station in South Carolina, that were performed as far back as the early 1990s, suggesting that the NRC had known for some time about the flood threats. Those analyses showed that the 5-foot flood wall protecting crucial safety equipment at Oconee would prove inadequate in the event of a catastrophic failure of the Jocassee Dam, located 11 miles upstream on Lake Keowee. If that dam failed completely, the report suggested, floodwaters as high as 16.8 feet would inundate the Oconee facility, and a meltdown would be a virtual certainty.

from here ; http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/04/nuclear-power-whistleblowers_n_2232108.html

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Oh and I know, you should be mindful of it, we all should... my house is 14.9 miles NE of the plant, iow right in the usual wind path if there was an accident... I pay attention to it. There are certainly issues, but I feel decent about them having a handle on it, but you do never know.

Honestly I'm more concerned about Sunny Point... there was a ship that caught fire down there in 2001 on a ship that had 1,300 containers of munitions... it was something like 2,000,000 lbs of TNT equivalent... and that's like what, a mile from the Brunswick Plant? Yeah, a giant explosion and damage to the nuke plant... genius.

...and also there's this:

Atlantic Tsunami Threat to the East Coast.

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I don't think so, they have munitions but I don't think they have any nukes there. Klong said its the nuclear stuff at GE and Floppin said its because there are two units at Brunswick... I think its a shitty map.

I'm certain the marker is for the GE site. That map is accurate, but would be better if it were more detailed. Maybe listing plant/site names.

You realize the fukushima reactors blew up because they didnt get adequate cooling water because their emergency generators flooded , electrical gear was flooded and they couldnt run their pumps, right?

I'm pretty sure the beginning of the problem was that the tsunami wiped out the generator fuel lines which were not buried underground the way they are at US plants.

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lol

As you know kurb, I'm right there with ya.

Purchased some firearms, Glock 17, Beretta shottie, 30-06 rifle.

Have plenty of water, storable food, generator, back up generator, etc.

Go bags.....lots of stuff.

My wife gave me the "you are kinda nutz" look, but when she saw that gubmint "be prepared, have a plan" commercial, she did the Hmm, I guess we are ready...and thanks for remembering those feminine hygiene products"

I didn't tell her they make good field dressings.

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One of the running jokes in our household is about how I keep a stash of dryer lint handy for fire starting...

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8 pages and not a single mention of needing or having a GEIGER COUNTER

Bomp bomp bomp tsh

another one bites the dusta

and another one down and another one down

another one bites the dust

hey, gunna gitcha too

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Guest Tom Cat

I'm certain the marker is for the GE site. That map is accurate, but would be better if it were more detailed. Maybe listing plant/site names.

I'm pretty sure the beginning of the problem was that the tsunami wiped out the generator fuel lines which were not buried underground the way they are at US plants.

The Southport plant has had ongoing problems with their emergency diesel generators - the NRC has given them another 3 or so years to get the problems fixed.

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i see kurb has been taking my 2014 cryptic posts from time to time seriously.

ya gotta be VERY contrarian when it comes to this. the social disorder philly mentions to me is hands down the paradigm shift if something bad happens. homework. study peoples tendancies when something bad happens like a hurricane etc. watch the news and just pay attention. what are the common jam ups? what causes skrimishes etc? basics. food and gas.

but if big things happen, you will have to avoid crowds and running with the pack for at least the first 6-9 months. have your share of supplies and stuff you may never think of. from a good ole can opener to eye glasses to basic first aid kit stuff to wire cutters you name it. at some point you will have to break into or OUT of something. better have the tools.

you know what plants you can or can't eat? which ones produces water?

if you can go somewhere and hole up for that 6 month or so window, you then get a better idea of who is left, who is in charge and who wants power. you also see who else was prepared as well as who has water. which will be mucho more precious than gold.

that means coastal towns will be over run. you will want to be at least 5-7 miles from a water source.

also, good idea to have a cb radio or two way. fema will own cell reception and bandwidth so your cool phone and apps might not last long.

don't expect your gps on your phone to help for too long. not to mention it will allow those in power to know your whereabouts.

contrarians win. im telling you.

this isn't contrarian at all right now... this is trendy as all hell.

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