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ESPN commentator on RG3: “He’s kind of black, but he’s not really”


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#46 KillerKat

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 02:50 PM

Clearly he must have missed the ESPN memo that states...We're only mocking and ridiculing one minority QB at a time and right now it's Cam.

Wow...we are going backwards in time. It's okay for folks like Skip and Charlie Casserly to push the boundaries of racism when it comes to Cam, by outwardly ridiculing and blatanly stereotyping him without shame and some even going as far as labeling him a ....you know... "thug," which seem to now be a another word for the "n" word. But, Rob playing the reverse role with RG III and he gets suspended...Go figure. He, should have know better. Just because they say we're equal, doesn't mean we can play the same games.

Don't worry when a cop pulls RG III over for stupid reasons and profile him, he will realize that no matter how he much he wants to see himself, the color of his skin is how he will always be judged by way to many in this society. Just ask Obama.



In all honesty, maybe if the Europeans had not re-define us and mold us into their image, we wouldn't be defining ourselves and our own as trying to be like them. There is something about studying African History that makes one realize how much we really were stripped of our identity and culture. Something many folks not only take for granted but seem to dismiss as if we should be grateful.Seriously?


When studying African History did you study about the part where a Queen in West Africa captured and sold other africans. Amongst other parts of Afica where they captured their enemies and sold them too. This was done to keep the exchange of goods flowing. By the way, that wasn't taught when I was in high school. Which was just 10 years ago. Slavery isn't just a black and white thing. It had been around since the dawn of man by all cultures and races.

The point? Everyone's ancestors were pretty fuged up. Just like the individual person grew from very primitive stages to where the person is now, us as a society (including everyone in the world) has grown up together out of our primitive stages into a more intelligent one where we can all live together, generally speaking. We should appreciate each other and live our own lives without being torn apart by bigoted assumptions that go back to our previous primitive society ways.

#47 Mr. Scot

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:54 PM

This is the part that most white people will never understand. The thing that SAS was referring to was the fact that as recently as 50 years ago, black people were viewed as second class citizens. For a black man to triumph over the social inequity in our relative "starting positions", is a much bigger accomplishment for a black man than a white man. Black men start from a position of disadvantage and have to work their way towards relevance while white men start from a position of privilege based entirely on skin color. Starting field position is a good analogy. Black men start on the 20 yard line.... white men start on the 50. However, back in the day that disparity was even worse. Black men started on the 1 yard line. Progress is being made, but things haven't been set quite straight yet either. And before anybody chimes in about socioeconomic issues, I do know that there exist poor white people and rich black people. This changes nothing about my overall point.

SAS was saying that this dog fight from the 1 yard line to the 20 yard line needs to be remembered. It needs to be a point of pride for a black man. Because without the blood spilled by his ancestors, he wouldn't have been in position to have success. While you shouldn't define who you are wholly based upon race, it would be disrespectful to the civil rights movement to ignore the struggle of your people to get you to the place where you are now. To be PROUD of your heritage and not hide it away because that makes people more comfortable. To not let your race be a subject you shy away from because you feel inadequate as a black man in a white man's position historically.

The same reason we call Obama our first black president and not just our president.... because the acceptance by the American people of a person of color being in the highest office in the land represents a tremendous sea change from when only a generation ago, black people weren't allowed to drink from the same water fountains, eat at the same places, or ride in the front of the bus. To act as if those things never happened would be revisionist history.


What happened to this?

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.


Soooo...that isn't the idea anymore?

And just an FYI. If you think every white person starts from "a position of privilege", make a visit to West Virginia sometime. You won't see much in the way of "privilege" there.

#48 Vagrant

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 05:24 AM

What happened to this?



Soooo...that isn't the idea anymore?

And just an FYI. If you think every white person starts from "a position of privilege", make a visit to West Virginia sometime. You won't see much in the way of "privilege" there.


I certainly can understand how you would interpret those words by MLK. I think, though do not know because I never talked to the man, that the intention was that in the future he was hopeful that a generation would exist that was entirely color blind. This is a very ambitious dream, but that's why it is a dream and not a reality.

What MLK did not say, however, was that when this dream was achieved that black people should act as if these atrocities never took place. That they should not be proud of the struggle. That they should not pride themselves on rising above the limits that white society placed upon them. In fact, I would say that he claimed the opposite position. That the time for black people to rejoice is when they have risen to the highest levels. When they can look back down the mountain and see the hands of their ancestors pushing them towards the top against the forces of oppression. I know it may sound dramatic, but it's all true.

I believe what SAS was advocating was ownership of those facts. Not saying, "let's not talk about me being black", but instead saying "I am incredibly proud of my black heritage, but I do not want to be limited by the glass ceiling that has been placed upon quarterbacks of my race but by all quarterbacks in history regardless of color". Showing due respect to those who came before you who were literally killed in the name of seeking equality.

#49 Mr. Scot

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:30 AM

I certainly can understand how you would interpret those words by MLK. I think, though do not know because I never talked to the man, that the intention was that in the future he was hopeful that a generation would exist that was entirely color blind. This is a very ambitious dream, but that's why it is a dream and not a reality.

What MLK did not say, however, was that when this dream was achieved that black people should act as if these atrocities never took place. That they should not be proud of the struggle. That they should not pride themselves on rising above the limits that white society placed upon them. In fact, I would say that he claimed the opposite position. That the time for black people to rejoice is when they have risen to the highest levels. When they can look back down the mountain and see the hands of their ancestors pushing them towards the top against the forces of oppression. I know it may sound dramatic, but it's all true.

I believe what SAS was advocating was ownership of those facts. Not saying, "let's not talk about me being black", but instead saying "I am incredibly proud of my black heritage, but I do not want to be limited by the glass ceiling that has been placed upon quarterbacks of my race but by all quarterbacks in history regardless of color". Showing due respect to those who came before you who were literally killed in the name of seeking equality.


To clarify, nobody that I've seen is taking issue with what Stephen A Smith said. Rob Parker is the one who said Griffin wasn't 'black enough'. Smith said he was uncomfortable with what Parker said.

Parker's suggestion that Griffin is disrespecting his past is, in my opinion, silly. Griffin is saying "judge me on my skill, not my skin". And what's wrong with that?

#50 CCS

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:18 AM

Am I the only one who finds it ironic that the grown version of Steve Urkel is calling out someone on not being black?

#51 Falcons1stPanthers2nd

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 08:23 AM

I'm white. I grew up on the poverty line. Went to a 97% black school. Got my ass jumped for nothing more than being white. I busted my ass to get where i am and i hate when self righteous black men/women act like i had it easier because of the color of my skin. I busted my ass to get where i am. You think a hood rat white boy fits in with the corporate world? The fact of the matter is it's no longer black and white. It's rich vs poor. The sooner everyone realizes this the better. Also it's all well and good to be proud of your heritage. I'm proud of mine. I get angry when blacks think that whites should cater to them cause of poo that happened 50 years ago when most of the ones i meet weren't even close to alive yet and have never even experienced REAL racism. (not saying anyone in particular, speaking in general terms)

#52 carolina-chuck

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:07 AM

man RGIII is more black than Cam lol. Just look at the hair comparison

#53 g5jamz

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

http://sports.yahoo....14227--nfl.html

RG3=classy

#54 Mr. Scot

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:54 AM

He's also wrong.

Tony Romo absolutely should listen to his critics.

#55 footballisasport

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 10:35 PM

Yeah, it' good to see Rob lost his ESPN job over playing the typical black man's stereotyping of RG. He should have just stuck to the typical white man's stereotyping of blacks that the media have been using on Cam without shame and getting away with it. You know, the typical...lazy, bad attitude, and need to be taught stereotyping that seems to be part of the fabric of this society to this day.

I'm sure Rob playing that card over the silly "cornball" label he used would have gone over much better. Him calling RG a "cornball" made him appear quite bitter. Unlike the silly nitpicking over a towel on the Cam' head and his facial expression during a team lost that then gets spun into some sort of immaturity issues and folks questioning his leadership and locker room abilties. Amazing how well that went against Cam. Rob should have known how the passve aggresive game is played by now.

#56 Keith Moons Liver

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:49 AM

This is the part that most white people will never understand.

Nice racist generalization.

#57 g5jamz

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:50 PM

Surprised this sort of article hasn't been written about Russell Wilson either. Maybe because he's not in DC?


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