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ESPN commentator on RG3: “He’s kind of black, but he’s not really”


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#37 Mr. Scot

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:01 PM

Griffin comes across as intelligent, articulate, sensible, polite and an overall admirable young man.

Someone will have to explain to me which of those characteristics makes him "less black".

#38 scpanther22

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:01 PM

What was Skip's response, or did they cut the whole conversation after Stephen A. responded?


From what I remember Stephen A said it wasn’t his place to question RG3 “blackness” but he believes every black QB should express some level of pride and acknowledgment of their roots.

#39 Mr. Scot

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:06 PM

From what I remember Stephen A said it wasn’t his place to question RG3 “blackness” but he believes every black QB should express some level of pride and acknowledgment of their roots.


From what I've seen, I don't think Griffin not wanting to be identified as a "black quarterback" has anything to do with denying his roots or denying those that have gone before him. I think it's just that he wants to be known primarily as a quarterback, skin color be damned.

And why shouldn't he?

For my part, I don't think he's going to prove durable enough to be a long term great QB. I certainly wish him the best though (except when he plays us). He's the kind of kid I think anybody can root for, even if he's not on your favorite team.

#40 scpanther22

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:15 PM

Wtf is a cornball brother? Is that the new version of Uncle Tom or something?

Basically, I'm not saying this is my personal view but the example i've seen countless times as a "cornball brother" is Tiger Woods. Parker and First take have talked Tiger woods like that in past shows.

#41 footballisasport

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 08:32 PM

He gets suspended for what he said but when Skip and all the other folks were making their usual negative black stereotypical comments against Cam did it, no one at ESPN ot the sport media in general had a problem with it. What is the message being send about the real hyposcrisy and control.

#42 Vagrant

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 08:07 AM

From what I've seen, I don't think Griffin not wanting to be identified as a "black quarterback" has anything to do with denying his roots or denying those that have gone before him. I think it's just that he wants to be known primarily as a quarterback, skin color be damned.

And why shouldn't he?

For my part, I don't think he's going to prove durable enough to be a long term great QB. I certainly wish him the best though (except when he plays us). He's the kind of kid I think anybody can root for, even if he's not on your favorite team.


This is the part that most white people will never understand. The thing that SAS was referring to was the fact that as recently as 50 years ago, black people were viewed as second class citizens. For a black man to triumph over the social inequity in our relative "starting positions", is a much bigger accomplishment for a black man than a white man. Black men start from a position of disadvantage and have to work their way towards relevance while white men start from a position of privilege based entirely on skin color. Starting field position is a good analogy. Black men start on the 20 yard line.... white men start on the 50. However, back in the day that disparity was even worse. Black men started on the 1 yard line. Progress is being made, but things haven't been set quite straight yet either. And before anybody chimes in about socioeconomic issues, I do know that there exist poor white people and rich black people. This changes nothing about my overall point.

SAS was saying that this dog fight from the 1 yard line to the 20 yard line needs to be remembered. It needs to be a point of pride for a black man. Because without the blood spilled by his ancestors, he wouldn't have been in position to have success. While you shouldn't define who you are wholly based upon race, it would be disrespectful to the civil rights movement to ignore the struggle of your people to get you to the place where you are now. To be PROUD of your heritage and not hide it away because that makes people more comfortable. To not let your race be a subject you shy away from because you feel inadequate as a black man in a white man's position historically.

The same reason we call Obama our first black president and not just our president.... because the acceptance by the American people of a person of color being in the highest office in the land represents a tremendous sea change from when only a generation ago, black people weren't allowed to drink from the same water fountains, eat at the same places, or ride in the front of the bus. To act as if those things never happened would be revisionist history.

#43 Matthias

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 09:52 AM

This is the part that most white people will never understand. The thing that SAS was referring to was the fact that as recently as 50 years ago, black people were viewed as second class citizens. For a black man to triumph over the social inequity in our relative "starting positions", is a much bigger accomplishment for a black man than a white man. Black men start from a position of disadvantage and have to work their way towards relevance while white men start from a position of privilege based entirely on skin color. Starting field position is a good analogy. Black men start on the 20 yard line.... white men start on the 50. However, back in the day that disparity was even worse. Black men started on the 1 yard line. Progress is being made, but things haven't been set quite straight yet either. And before anybody chimes in about socioeconomic issues, I do know that there exist poor white people and rich black people. This changes nothing about my overall point.

SAS was saying that this dog fight from the 1 yard line to the 20 yard line needs to be remembered. It needs to be a point of pride for a black man. Because without the blood spilled by his ancestors, he wouldn't have been in position to have success. While you shouldn't define who you are wholly based upon race, it would be disrespectful to the civil rights movement to ignore the struggle of your people to get you to the place where you are now. To be PROUD of your heritage and not hide it away because that makes people more comfortable. To not let your race be a subject you shy away from because you feel inadequate as a black man in a white man's position historically.

The same reason we call Obama our first black president and not just our president.... because the acceptance by the American people of a person of color being in the highest office in the land represents a tremendous sea change from when only a generation ago, black people weren't allowed to drink from the same water fountains, eat at the same places, or ride in the front of the bus. To act as if those things never happened would be revisionist history.



I think that is just it, most people don't know what to do with this heritage. The Civil Rights Movement should be something that all Americans, no matter what the skin tone, should be proud of. We should all honor this movement, yet it's mostly only seen as something black people should be proud of. When that happens, it becomes a seperating factor for us, something to divide people.

What I'm trying to say is, how do I honor the Civil Rights Movement and my ancestors? Is my heritage nothing more than a constant struggle of trying to be seen as equal or trying to catch up with the rest of the world? Because if I saw it like that, I would have some resentment about the world I'm living in. It would be hard for me to fully connect with others who are not my skin tone.

By the way, when talking about ancestors, at some point we all have the same ancestors. So instead of just black people honoring the movement as a special part of their history, all americans should take it as their own personal history. That is the only thing that will bring us together. There's nothing to be ashamed of, our ancestors were fighting for equality. Why should it be one group's burden to keep that heritage alive?

#44 footballisasport

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 08:55 PM

Clearly he must have missed the ESPN memo that states...We're only mocking and ridiculing one minority QB at a time and right now it's Cam.

Wow...we are going backwards in time. It's okay for folks like Skip and Charlie Casserly to push the boundaries of racism when it comes to Cam, by outwardly ridiculing and blatanly stereotyping him without shame and some even going as far as labeling him a ....you know... "thug," which seem to now be a another word for the "n" word. But, Rob playing the reverse role with RG III and he gets suspended...Go figure. He, should have know better. Just because they say we're equal, doesn't mean we can play the same games.

Don't worry when a cop pulls RG III over for stupid reasons and profile him, he will realize that no matter how he much he wants to see himself, the color of his skin is how he will always be judged by way to many in this society. Just ask Obama.

Reminds me of one of my good friends from college was a black guy that got made fun of by other black guys because he 'dressed white' and hung out with me, a white-ish fellow. I guess he wasn't black enough, or a 'cornball brother', whatever the fug that means. Racism is definitely two sided.


In all honesty, maybe if the Europeans had not re-define us and mold us into their image, we wouldn't be defining ourselves and our own as trying to be like them. There is something about studying African History that makes one realize how much we really were stripped of our identity and culture. Something many folks not only take for granted but seem to dismiss as if we should be grateful.Seriously?

#45 tight lines

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 11:53 AM

Yes, Parker is black. So it's not racist. It's just fuging retarded.


Yeah but is he really black? Is he down with the cause?
he doesn't even have braids so he doesn't have that going for him

#46 KillerKat

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 02:50 PM

Clearly he must have missed the ESPN memo that states...We're only mocking and ridiculing one minority QB at a time and right now it's Cam.

Wow...we are going backwards in time. It's okay for folks like Skip and Charlie Casserly to push the boundaries of racism when it comes to Cam, by outwardly ridiculing and blatanly stereotyping him without shame and some even going as far as labeling him a ....you know... "thug," which seem to now be a another word for the "n" word. But, Rob playing the reverse role with RG III and he gets suspended...Go figure. He, should have know better. Just because they say we're equal, doesn't mean we can play the same games.

Don't worry when a cop pulls RG III over for stupid reasons and profile him, he will realize that no matter how he much he wants to see himself, the color of his skin is how he will always be judged by way to many in this society. Just ask Obama.



In all honesty, maybe if the Europeans had not re-define us and mold us into their image, we wouldn't be defining ourselves and our own as trying to be like them. There is something about studying African History that makes one realize how much we really were stripped of our identity and culture. Something many folks not only take for granted but seem to dismiss as if we should be grateful.Seriously?


When studying African History did you study about the part where a Queen in West Africa captured and sold other africans. Amongst other parts of Afica where they captured their enemies and sold them too. This was done to keep the exchange of goods flowing. By the way, that wasn't taught when I was in high school. Which was just 10 years ago. Slavery isn't just a black and white thing. It had been around since the dawn of man by all cultures and races.

The point? Everyone's ancestors were pretty fuged up. Just like the individual person grew from very primitive stages to where the person is now, us as a society (including everyone in the world) has grown up together out of our primitive stages into a more intelligent one where we can all live together, generally speaking. We should appreciate each other and live our own lives without being torn apart by bigoted assumptions that go back to our previous primitive society ways.

#47 Mr. Scot

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:54 PM

This is the part that most white people will never understand. The thing that SAS was referring to was the fact that as recently as 50 years ago, black people were viewed as second class citizens. For a black man to triumph over the social inequity in our relative "starting positions", is a much bigger accomplishment for a black man than a white man. Black men start from a position of disadvantage and have to work their way towards relevance while white men start from a position of privilege based entirely on skin color. Starting field position is a good analogy. Black men start on the 20 yard line.... white men start on the 50. However, back in the day that disparity was even worse. Black men started on the 1 yard line. Progress is being made, but things haven't been set quite straight yet either. And before anybody chimes in about socioeconomic issues, I do know that there exist poor white people and rich black people. This changes nothing about my overall point.

SAS was saying that this dog fight from the 1 yard line to the 20 yard line needs to be remembered. It needs to be a point of pride for a black man. Because without the blood spilled by his ancestors, he wouldn't have been in position to have success. While you shouldn't define who you are wholly based upon race, it would be disrespectful to the civil rights movement to ignore the struggle of your people to get you to the place where you are now. To be PROUD of your heritage and not hide it away because that makes people more comfortable. To not let your race be a subject you shy away from because you feel inadequate as a black man in a white man's position historically.

The same reason we call Obama our first black president and not just our president.... because the acceptance by the American people of a person of color being in the highest office in the land represents a tremendous sea change from when only a generation ago, black people weren't allowed to drink from the same water fountains, eat at the same places, or ride in the front of the bus. To act as if those things never happened would be revisionist history.


What happened to this?

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.


Soooo...that isn't the idea anymore?

And just an FYI. If you think every white person starts from "a position of privilege", make a visit to West Virginia sometime. You won't see much in the way of "privilege" there.

#48 Vagrant

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 05:24 AM

What happened to this?



Soooo...that isn't the idea anymore?

And just an FYI. If you think every white person starts from "a position of privilege", make a visit to West Virginia sometime. You won't see much in the way of "privilege" there.


I certainly can understand how you would interpret those words by MLK. I think, though do not know because I never talked to the man, that the intention was that in the future he was hopeful that a generation would exist that was entirely color blind. This is a very ambitious dream, but that's why it is a dream and not a reality.

What MLK did not say, however, was that when this dream was achieved that black people should act as if these atrocities never took place. That they should not be proud of the struggle. That they should not pride themselves on rising above the limits that white society placed upon them. In fact, I would say that he claimed the opposite position. That the time for black people to rejoice is when they have risen to the highest levels. When they can look back down the mountain and see the hands of their ancestors pushing them towards the top against the forces of oppression. I know it may sound dramatic, but it's all true.

I believe what SAS was advocating was ownership of those facts. Not saying, "let's not talk about me being black", but instead saying "I am incredibly proud of my black heritage, but I do not want to be limited by the glass ceiling that has been placed upon quarterbacks of my race but by all quarterbacks in history regardless of color". Showing due respect to those who came before you who were literally killed in the name of seeking equality.