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Is this normal? Early onset mid-life crisis? WTF?

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[quote name='ARSEN' timestamp='1358282148' post='2098455']
I'm 26 and I got the same feeling. You know what helps? Just going away somewhere for a week or 2, away from everything.
[/quote]
I actually find doing that to be more depressing because you see what life can be like when you're not doing your normal thing.

I prefer going on many little trips to get away at least twice a month.

I have 15 vacation days. I'd honestly rather take three day weekends 15 times a year (or maybe a couple 4 day weekends) than go on one long trip that uses up 10 days.
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[quote name='Scrumtrilescent' timestamp='1358275421' post='2098233']
I heard of a guy who did that.



His name was Ted Kaczynski.
[/quote]
Exactly what I was thinking.

I know as I've gotten older I've gotten less materialistic. Not sure why that is, but I guess you get to a point in your life where you look at all the stuff you have, and wonder how it would be to live without all that stuff.

I doubt I'd ever go full Grizzly Adams, but I can see the allure of getting away from it all.

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Ill try to step up my posting

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same poo here bronn, i've been down that road. i'm a bit younger than you (27 now) but the midlife crisis hit me at age 22. i grew up in a household of massively high expectations based entirely around financial success and social status. acquiring as much money as possible and attaining security and stability and status were the gods of my formative years. and so when my knees blew out and i got booted from the marines and dropped out of school and working in a goddamn fast food kitchen i dropped into a pretty deep existential crisis for a good long time. that's when i began to question the entire realm of ideology i'd been fed since childhood, and in an effort to escape it i basically did a brain dump and shoved aside all my preexisting notions about the world and what it meant to live and started over fresh. i spent probably a year straight in the guilford college library almost every night reading nothing but philosophy and theology and literature and science and geography and astronomy and everything else in an attempt to ingest as much knowledge as possible and to, at the same time, find my place in the universe, if i had one.

what happened was a gradual slide away from the grasp of materialism and the deadly clutches of western consumer culture. i began to see those things for the shadows they are rather than security they're propped up to be, and in the process of this paradigm shift i completely lost respect for death and for fear and for security and comfort, and in response i quit my job, sold the better part of my possessions, and bought a one-way ticket to australia. i wandered through australian wilderness and up into the jungles of southeast asia living out of an old external frame backpack and doing nothing but reading and writing and thinking and engaging in discourse with as many new people as i could encounter, seeking, in what was almost a spiritual experience - a pilgrimage of sorts, as i recognize it now to have been - the answers to life's greatest mysteries.

years later, in truth, i am no closer to arriving at those answers, and in fact the waters have been muddied quite considerably. the more i discover the more complex things become in my mind. but i am attempting to make a career out of pursuing those answers, and i have discovered a great many intangible things to find joy in this life, and now i'm married to someone who shares in the dream of creating a community property with the goal of bringing in orphans and foster care castoffs and caring for them, and enabling others on the property to accomplish great, world-changing goals by the support of the collective, financially and otherwise. it's that drive that keeps me working 60-70 hour workweeks along with full time school to make this a reality.

so... there comes a point when idealism meets reality, and of course you can't just up and fly to australia and leave your wife and kids behind. but maybe that longing in your heart can be fulfilled by finding an adventure, a deeper purpose, in life, one that goes beyond your mere existence. it's something to explore; maybe you'll like what you find.

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You may ask yourself, what is that beautiful house?

You may ask yourself, where does that highway lead to?

You may ask yourself, am I right, am I wrong?

You may say to yourself, my god, what have I done?


Same as it ever was.
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[quote name='Kurb' timestamp='1358276853' post='2098266']
You can get away from those things now Bron, right where you are.


Funny thing is getting a smart TV helped me get away from "the suck" at little.


Instead of watching the "EVERYTHING IS BAD" network news in the evenings, I play music through Pandora (instrumental covers, and the like)
[/quote]

win

Went the 46" 240hz LED w/ Apple TV cloud mirroring this past year...no more cable tv, no more hdmi chords...fuggin rocks

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when you focus on helping others, the clouds seem to part more often and the sun shines more.

don't focus on what was. focus on what can be.

i always crack up when i hear or see the phrase, "lost faith in humanity". remove the last two words and that's why there is the feeling you might feel.

but here. let me inspire you with a random youtube post.

well can't find it. its the chat between bruce willis and samuel l in Unbreakable.
just a few quotes i think fit.

Elijah(SLJ) talking to Bruce Willis- It's hard for many people to believe that there are extraordinary things inside themselves, as well as others. I hope you can keep an open mind.

SLJ to BW again. It's alright to be afraid, David, because this part won't be like a comic book. Real life doesn't fit into little boxes that were drawn for it.

SLJ to BW last time. Do you know what the scariest thing is? To not know your place in this world, to not know why you're here.

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Misanthropy.

It is inevitable in this world, in the American society.

Embrace it and love the ones that you believe are people who go against the grain even more. Realize ever more how special they are. Draw your energy and positive thoughts by people that you know can be different and can be special. Obviously you think there are such people having a wife and family you care for. Realize this life is a free ride and you have been privilaged above and beyond. START MEDITATING. Realise life, here on earth, is just surface deep you have nothing invested here regardless of what poeple want to try and get you to believe (including your own concious), try and have fun and make the best of it. Find purpose in the special poeple here and appriciate them.

I have not had a mid life crisis but I used to suffer from panic attacks. I still have them but I stop them dead in their tracks. We all fear what is happening here on earth, and the fact we don't know where we are or what we are doing or where we are going. That is how it was meant to be and it was meant to be that way so we could live life and let go. Don't let the fear turn to hate and consume yourself, your soul and ultimatley make the world and humans worse than they already are while condeming yourself. That is the ultimate battle we all face, the test we all take.

It's all mentality, it's in your mind and your concious and no where else.

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who's talking about fear and misanthropy? I'm talking about a lack of motivation to strive for the things i'm told as a society we need to strive for. I'm trying to detach myself from others' fear and misanthropy.

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I have to admit, though, a lot of mine stems from misanthropy to an extent... but it is a huge paradox because, like I said, I have a huge, tender heart and love the people I love with all of it...

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for some reason i never struggled with the possibility that life just might be meaningless and/or just a big pile of random chaos that the human race has slapped a name and a set of rules on. it never depressed or upset me. of course i had my early-mid 20s existential crisis (am i really who i think i am? what am i doing with my limited time on this floating space rock? etc.) but that concept didn't play into it much.

my feeling about it is that while there may not be any magic "why" to give everything meaning and make one feel whole, this also means that there's also no magic "why" that needs to be chased or figured out when we're faced with terrible tragedies or the horrible poo that happens on this planet.

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Many of my friends live a fairly "simple" life and they love it. I could have chosen to get into farming and live that exact same life.

It didn't suit me, I usually change jobs every two years or so, keep the same career, but take jobs that lead to my career advancement. I want to make enough money to live very comfortably, and to be able to support my parents.

I like to ride on Bertrams. I enjoy living by the beach, and having a boat, etc.... My more simple friends/family do not appreciate these things as much as I do.....so I work like crazy.

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