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The league's only black OC makes it to the Super Bowl....

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OWINGS MILLS, Md. (AP) -- Jim Caldwell enjoys his job as offensive coordinator of the Baltimore Ravens, and he's quite good at it.

Before taking over in early December Caldwell had never held the position at any level - yet the Ravens' attack has flourished under his direction. Quarterback Joe Flacco has looked sharp, the play-calling has been unpredictable and Baltimore has scored 90 points in three playoff games to earn a berth in the Super Bowl.

Caldwell's success prompted head coach John Harbaugh to ask him to retain the post in 2013. Caldwell appreciates the opportunity, but has no intention of making ''Offensive Coordinator, Baltimore Ravens'' the last line on his resume.

The 58-year-old Caldwell wants to be a head coach. He did it in Indianapolis from 2009-11, and is itching for another crack at the top job in his profession.

''At some point in time, if the Lord wills it, I'd love to be able to do it again,'' Caldwell said Friday. ''But it may not happen. Everybody in our profession is looking for an opportunity to run their own program, and I'm no different than anybody else in that regard.''

Caldwell might have gotten the chance to at least interview for an opening if he wasn't so busy helping the Ravens earn a date with San Francisco in the Super Bowl next Sunday.

''I had a couple of GMs tell me, 'If it weren't for your guys' success in the playoffs and continuing to play, then he would have been someone we would have interviewed,'' Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome said. ''Hopefully next year we're in the same spot, and it will be tough for him to get interviews again. Really, though, I can see him getting that opportunity a year from now.''

Caldwell certainly is a viable candidate for a head coaching job. He took the Colts to the Super Bowl in 2009 and was instrumental in the development of quarterback Peyton Manning. He's also provided the Baltimore offense with a boost after replacing the fired Cam Cameron on Dec. 10.

Some coaches are fiery. Some break clipboards to get a player's attention. Caldwell does none of that.

''Man, he is so humble, laid back,'' Baltimore receiver Jacoby Jones said. ''But he's a smart man. He reads a lot of books, gives you a lot of quotes. He's so diverse.''

The NFL's Rooney Rule was designed to provide diversity among NFL head coaches and GMs, but if Caldwell - an African American with impressive credentials - can't get an interview, then maybe it's time to fix the process.

''I do think that it's something that certainly needs to be revisited, and is going to be revisited,'' Caldwell said. ''I'm not one of the individuals that started that particular drive to do so. There's been a lot of very intelligent men that have looked at this thing and talked about it in depth, so I think that's going to happen.

In the meantime, Caldwell is preparing for the Super Bowl while dozens of other coaches are at home looking forward to next year. So, despite not getting an interview, he has no regrets.

''None whatsoever. I'd certainly rather be right where I am right now, with you asking me this question,'' he said. ''It just doesn't happen that often in your career to be fortunate enough to have this opportunity. I'm thankful. The other things, they'll take care of themselves somewhere down the road.''

Caldwell deserves plenty of credit for Baltimore's surprising run to the Super Bowl. In the six games since he's taken over, the Ravens have averaged 26.2 points and 406.2 yards of offense. During the playoffs, Baltimore has scored touchdowns on eight of 10 trips inside the opponent's 20-yard line.

''What coach Caldwell has done has kept the offense simple and basic,'' running back Ray Rice said. ''He put the game into Joe Flacco's hands, and Joe has done a great job - phenomenal job - of leading us to where we needed to be. We are right here where we want to be right now.''

And maybe, so is Caldwell. For now, anyway. He expressed genuine appreciation and thanks Friday when talking about being asked to return in 2013.

''I'm excited about it. Certainly very honored and humbled as well,'' he said. ''It's a great opportunity for me, in particular working within this organization. I'm looking forward to it, but right now I'm looking forward to this next ball game we've got coming up. That's the most important thing.''

http://sports.yahoo....01891--nfl.html

There are several other articles and comments that have popped up over the week over this subject. All critical of the NFL's "good ole boy" network that rejects diversity and anything that isnt white. It seems the "this only matters to King Taharqa" crowd was wrong.

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BS thread.

Stigma stuff won't cut it in the NFL any longer. Black QB's, Both coaches in a Super Bowl were black. At some point, you will have to take the chip off your shoulder and not see "everything" through your stigma glasses. At some point, producing, winning and losing will have an effect on your job and ability to get one.

Not many guys in the NFL are long for their positions, no matter the color.

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BS thread.

Stigma stuff won't cut it in the NFL any longer. Black QB's, Both coaches in a Super Bowl were black. At some point, you will have to take the chip off your shoulder and not see "everything" through your stigma glasses. At some point, producing, winning and losing will have an effect on your job and ability to get one.

Not many guys in the NFL are long for their positions, no matter the color.

The eternal, constant buzzword around the hiring of non-whites to any positions of leadership and authority in the NFL, in every other sport and in every walk of American life, is “qualified.” Oh, where can we find “qualified” minority candidates? What kind of plan, system or program can we put in place to uncover those “qualified” coaches who are so hidden from view?

"It's about perception. It's not about qualifications. There are no objective standards,’’ said Kellen Winslow, Hall of Fame tight end and former executive director of the Fritz Pollard Alliance.

http://aol.sportingnews.com/nfl/story/2013-01-22/nfl-coach-hires-ravens-oc-jim-caldwell-black-coaches-rooney-rule

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Lovie Smith, meet Marty Schotenhiemer. Winning coaches, but could not make the big one, so, bye.

Just because you beat the same drum that has been beating for the last 50 years, does not mean its tune rings true.

Blacks have made it. Sorry to burst your bubble. Now, they will be like all other coaches, win or get fired.

Oh, and by the way, people here are not calling for Rivera's head because he is not white, it is because we sucked. Win or go home.

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I don't get the "NFL is 40 years behind the rest of the world" part.

Most sports of this type, except for maybe hockey, don't seem to have the sort of racial issues when it comes to hiring well qualified men of other races to top jobs in their sport. I think that was his point.

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Lovie Smith, meet Marty Schotenhiemer. Winning coaches, but could not make the big one, so, bye.

Just because you beat the same drum that has been beating for the last 50 years, does not mean its tune rings true.

Blacks have made it. Sorry to burst your bubble. Now, they will be like all other coaches, win or get fired.

Oh, and by the way, people here are not calling for Rivera's head because he is not white, it is because we sucked. Win or go home.

Maybe it's you who need to look a littler further than just skin color to make your defensive argument against the OP point. Lovie and Marty situation may look the same on the surface but in reality their stories are different.

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Maybe it's you who need to look a littler further than just skin color to make your defensive argument against the OP point. Lovie and Marty situation may look the same on the surface but in reality their stories are different.

Then why stop there, why not enlighten us all with the differences.

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Lovie Smith, meet Marty Schotenhiemer. Winning coaches, but could not make the big one, so, bye.

Just because you beat the same drum that has been beating for the last 50 years, does not mean its tune rings true.

Blacks have made it. Sorry to burst your bubble. Now, they will be like all other coaches, win or get fired.

Oh, and by the way, people here are not calling for Rivera's head because he is not white, it is because we sucked. Win or go home.

john fox is actually the closest thing to a modern day schottenheimer btw

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Problem with this statement is it's only going one way. I guess white people need to complain that there aren't enough white running back's and wide receiver's in the NFL.

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Problem with this statement is it's only going one way. I guess white people need to complain that there aren't enough white running back's and wide receiver's in the NFL.

If they felt that the league was discriminating against them due to their race and not performance or ability they should complain. If they felt the league wouldnt even give them a look due to their race and not their performance or ability they should complain. By the way, there are more white RBs and WRs in the NFL RIGHT NOW than there are black Offensive Coordinators and QB coaches.

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If they felt that the league was discriminating against them due to their race and not performance or ability they should complain. If they felt the league wouldnt even give them a look due to their race and not their performance or ability they should complain. By the way, there are more white RBs and WRs in the NFL RIGHT NOW than there are black Offensive Coordinators and QB coaches.

First: There are more white running back and wide receivers because most teams carry three or sometimes for, if you are going to look at that stat objectively you need to look at percentages.

Second: Who says white people don't make better coaches? You can make a brood statement then use circular reason to prove your point.

By the way, I'm not racist and I am all for civil rights. I just like to see the best candidates for the job obtain it.

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First: There are more white running back and wide receivers because most teams carry three or sometimes for, if you are going to look at that stat objectively you need to look at percentages.

There is a higher percentage of white RBs and white WRs ACTIVE in the NFL right now than there are black OCs and QB coaches. And as stated earlier in this thread, at one point every RB and WR was white in the NFL. There's never been a point where the majority of your OCs and QB coaches were black.

Second: Who says white people don't make better coaches? You can make a brood statement then use circular reason to prove your point.

2 points. 1st, we dont know if they make better coaches or not because a lot of NFL GMs and execs don't hire anything but and will only interview white people for OC & QB coaching jobs. So we have nothing to compare them to.

2nd, if that were true, why doesnt it hold true on defense? We have a plethora of minorities coaching on that side of the ball and some are the best in the business. Does one's melanin dictate how much they know OFFENSE? Because you just dont see it being "all white" on that side of the football as far as coaching goes.

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