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PhillyB

Post in this thread if you want to read and contribute to a thoughtful (if exhaustive) treatise on race and leadership in football

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thousands of words that actually deliver rather than end with platitudes and the truth is in the middle bullshit? a good post

maybe it's a product of spending years in a rather diverse environment but i really don't understand hate for the way cam communicates, and it's incredibly offensive for one to argue or imply that cam "struggles to communicate" just because he doesn't talk like a particular group of people wants him to. there aren't really any set rules wrt communication and if anyone has trouble understanding him that says far more about that person than mr. swag man

also tbh one could very easily say that peyton sounds like he has a stick lodged firmly up his ass and there are indeed times when an "ow wee mayne" is actually just what a team needs

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I was thinking about this tonight as I watched Russel Wilson give an interview on NFL Network. He is so "white friendly" it's no wonder the media heaps praise upon him. He sells. RG3 does as well. From a purely physical standpoint Cam is clearly superior but his image isn't as refined. I think it's a shame because Cam spends so much time and money giving back to the community but his lack of "whiteness" does detract from him in the mainstream media.

But Cam's communication trouble isn't just a racial issue, its generational. You can tell by the way he gives interviews that he grew up watching ESPN and sometimes he comes off the wrong way. Like when he apologized to Jerome Boger and he says "I'm going public". It made me think of a guy that grew up watching Cop dramas and gets a job as a Police Officer.

And Cam does have maturity issues. However I think the point of this thread is that maturity and refined Caucasian communication skills are not key to success in the NFL. In fact many NFL players reached amazing heights with no social skills while engaging in criminal behavior. Hall of Famers with all kinds of trouble in their lives found success in the NFL.

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Let's hope he has earned the C this year when the players vote. That's all that really matters, right?

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Is this that book you were talking about finishing Philly?

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Didn't know you had it in you, PB. Big ups!

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This may be my favorite post of the year.

I already told this story once, but I will give the quick version of it again. When I was in high school I was a good enough basketball player that the local news team here in Raleigh came out to do a feature on me.

They wanted to do an interview, so we go in the coaches office and they put a camera about a foot away from my face and a microphone inches from my mouth and ask me a simple question like, "Why do you hate to lose?" And I couldn't even muster up an answer. Just a long awkward silence.

I am a fairly smart guy. But I swear I could not form a complete sentence that entire interview. It was just a bunch of sentence fragments that luckily he edited up to make me not look like a complete idiot. Point being, it is very hard to be as intelligent and thoughtful as you want to be, or actually are, in the snap second that it is demanded of you in an interview.

As far as being articulate, and how that translates to being a leader. I can only speak as a basketball player, but more often than not, there is a real disconnect between the super smart, articulate guy, and the rest of the team that are just average Joes. In a locker room environment, leadership is earned, not spoken. It doesn't matter how well you can speak to the press if you can't speak to your peers. Leadership is earned by:

A.) Your actions at practice and in a game

B.) Your ability to communicate with your teammates

C.) And most importantly, the trust you have gained from your teammates through A&B

Leadership is not granted through words or articulation. It is earned by a personal connection to teammates and/or performance in practice and in games.

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This may be my favorite post of the year.

I already told this story once, but I will give the quick version of it again. When I was in high school I was a good enough basketball player that the local news team here in Raleigh came out to do a feature on me.

They wanted to do an interview, so we go in the coaches office and they put a camera about a foot away from my face and a microphone inches from my mouth and ask me a simple question like, "Why do you hate to lose?" And I couldn't even muster up an answer. Just a long awkward silence.

I am a fairly smart guy. But I swear I could not form a complete sentence that entire interview. It was just a bunch of sentence fragments that luckily he edited up to make me not look like a complete idiot. Point being, it is very hard to be as intelligent and thoughtful as you want to be, or actually are, in the snap second that it is demanded of you in an interview.

As far as being articulate, and how that translates to being a leader. I can only speak as a basketball player, but more often than not, there is a real disconnect between the super smart, articulate guy, and the rest of the team that are just average Joes. In a locker room environment, leadership is earned, not spoken. It doesn't matter how well you can speak to the press if you can't speak to your peers. Leadership is earned by:

A.) Your actions at practice and in a game

B.) Your ability to communicate with your teammates

C.) And most importantly, the trust you have gained from your teammates through A&B

Leadership is not granted through words or articulation. It is earned by a personal connection to teammates and/or performance in practice and in games.

There is somewhat of a disconnect between super smart, articulate guy and people in general. Sometimes simply being analytical, thoughtful and passionate is mistaken for arrogance.

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Many of the problems with how the average Joe/Jane assess things like leadership and intelligence stem from people just not having enough exposure to other cultures or sub-cultures. Humans generally fear or mistrust that which they don't understand, and that extends to things as simple as the way others talk or dress.

The answer is these types of problems is one of education and exposure. Unfortunately, that proves difficult at times as people would rather reside in their comfort zone and not open their minds to new things.

It's been my experience that Europeans often have a more open world view than the average American. Much of this can probably be attributed to their propensity to travel outside their home countries much, much more than most Americans.

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Expectations can be unfair at times because many times people will place them on someone yet ironically never tell the very person they have projected said burden on.

I have coached and played sports and I have learned a few things along the way.

When you tell someone you believe in them you really don't because when you do, it never has to be said. The opposite can happen with leadership. You may see it within someone but they may not just yet. Similar to saying you believe in them the same can be said of asking someone to step up and lead etc. If you are convinced they are a leader then you don't say it. You let it happen and then get out of the way.

I think the very nature of fans is to be irrational on what it wants from its team and players. Homerism and being a fan will do that.

I don't try to split the semantic atom and go into the Freudian level of what someone thinks or God forbid an article or feed from the media. I'm just a fan of sports and I like the Panthers and I want them to win. I don't have to tell them that or one guy.

All this back and forth on Cam reminds me of some friends who try to look so deep into a film they get lost in their analysis of imagery and lighting or plot holes or historical accuracy that they end up squeezing the fun and life out of just enjoying a movie for what it is. A movie.

Enjoy the team and Cams ups and downs as he grows. He will be fine.

Now pass me some popcorn and fanta cherry drink.

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+89 for the anthropology references, and for this being one of the best posts I've read here.

Absolutely! I'm down with anyone who can construct a scientific premise to explain some intangible principle of athletics (and no, I'm not being sarcastic - I really mean it)! Well done, sir. Mr. Darwin and Mr. Leakey would be proud of you!

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