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More gun laws = fewer deaths, 50-state study says

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Posted

Well that's settled

http://news.yahoo.com/more-gun-laws-fewer-deaths-134804944.html

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Posted

let me sum up the rest of this thread before it even starts

post-7949-0-49175800-1362687598_thumb.jp

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Posted

Of the gun deaths in the US, 60 percent were suicides.

We obviously have a gun problem that needs solving, and not a mental illness problem...

I wonder how many of the other gun deaths were attributed to the 60 percent that offed themselves too...

Also:

Our study has limitations. First, the legislative strength score, which tallies a single point per law, has not been validated. Neither has the weighted Brady scoring system, and we are unaware of any such scoring systems that have been validated. Our results, which divided states into quartiles of legislative strength, were essentially the same with either of these scoring systems. Second, we examined only deaths by firearms, not nonfatal firearm injuries; fatality was our primary outcome. Approximately 2.6 nonfatal firearm injuries are treated for every fatal firearm injury.1,40 Third, we were unable to control for the enforcement of firearm laws or the exploitation of loopholes, which may vary between states. Fourth, although we adjusted for many state-based factors associated with firearm fatalities, there may be additional factors not considered in our model that are relevant (eg, city laws and police enforcement). However, we included nonfirearm suicides and nonfirearm homicides in some of our analyses to control for the potential role of additional factors. We found little evidence of substitution—rates of firearm-related deaths were not correlated with rates of nonfirearm violent death in the multivariable model. Fifth, although we found that states with more legislation have lower fatality rates, ie, are “safer” states, in a cross-sectional ecological study we could not determine if the greater number of laws were the reason for the reduced fatality rates. The association could have been confounded by firearm ownership rates or other unaccounted factors.

In conclusion, we found an association between the legislative strength of a state's firearm laws—as measured by a higher number of laws—and a lower rate of firearm fatalities. The association was significant for firearm fatalities overall and for firearm suicide and firearm homicide deaths, individually. As our study could not determine a cause-and-effect relationship, further studies are necessary to define the nature of this association.

So no... It isn't so cut-and-dry...

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Posted

settled

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Posted

lol... because you say so?

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Posted

yes

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Posted

settled

Only thing that is settled is that you are an idiot.

Carry on.

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Posted

Only thing that is settled is that you are an idiot.

Carry on.

lol

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Posted

I'd like them to research the effect of population density to violent crime. I think that makes a noticeable difference too.

Speaking of which, I don't know if their study factored in states' populations against their rate of gun crime. I mean some of those states out west probably have little laws at all regarding firearms and have very few deaths based on population alone.

I'd bet that DC (last I checked was the highest population concentration in the country per square mile) leads the list in almost all violent crime.

In my opinion, that would be because people (in the US) just can't get along, especially when there is a high concentration of people per actual living space.

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Posted

I'd like them to research the effect of population density to violent crime. I think that makes a noticeable difference too.

Speaking of which, I don't know if their study factored in states' populations against their rate of gun crime. I mean some of those states out west probably have little laws at all regarding firearms and have very few deaths based on population alone.

I'd bet that DC (last I checked was the highest population concentration in the country per square mile) leads the list in almost all violent crime.

In my opinion, that would be because people (in the US) just can't get along, especially when there is a high concentration of people per actual living space.

i don't think DC is even in the top 5 in population density...

unless you're counting it as a state...

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Posted

maybe we should start funding gun research for the first time in decades

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Posted

it's not as though people pay attention to any of the other research out there.

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