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More gun laws = fewer deaths, 50-state study says

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Posted

eastern martial arts are first and foremost based in discipline, and tempered with spirituality.

Culturally, violence is our preferred way of problem solving, and is almost synonymous with our concept of masculinity. That, i think is the crux of the problem. When you combine this misinterpretation of masculinity with narcissism disguised as individuality and a general lack of respect for the people you live around (both personal and institutional,) and then add guns... well... there you go. That's not to say that it doesn't exist in other places, it certainly does... but Americans love the idea that they're tough, don't give a f*ck and will fight over anything. The fact that this has never been less true than it is now only makes it more insidious. We bought into our own myth, and it's f*cking us up.

Ah I see. I tend to attribute that attitude more toward immaturity (the slightest insult is worth fighting over) than worshipping violence but fair cop.

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Posted

People all over the world play video games and watch movies somewhere near the same rate as we do (some a little more, some a little less).

What they don't have is the same easy access to massive amounts of guns and ammo we do.

It's insanely simple.

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Posted

I wish someone could rectify the pro gun argument that the US has a disproportionate amount of mentally unhealthy people, with a desensitization to violence; therefore the only responsible thing to do is give this mentally unhealthy and desensitized society more guns and easier access to guns.

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Posted

blame somebody else. blame something else. blame the past.blame this. blame that. yeah its the new America.

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Posted

If I got shot I would pry blame the person that shot me.

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Posted

It would be the gun's fault

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Posted

I blame it all on drugs.

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Posted

I wish someone could rectify the pro gun argument that the US has a disproportionate amount of mentally unhealthy people, with a desensitization to violence; therefore the only responsible thing to do is give this mentally unhealthy and desensitized society more guns and easier access to guns.

If the system worked as intended, then they already have less access.

The problem is that the system doesn't work as intended, because there are loopholes and a black market for firearms.

My whole issue with any gun control legislation is that it doesn't really close loopholes, and no amount of legislation is ever going to penetrate the black market.

The government, like they do with lots of other issues we face as a country, wants to somehow make a show of "oh here's a problem we can fix with new laws and media sensationalism!" yet all they effectively do is waste taxpayers' time and money on the equivalent of a cheap bandaid (you know, the kind that don't stick worth a poo)...

Let's focus on fixing the situations that lead to the parts of our society that lean towards criminal action (like institutionalized racism, class warfare, and inequality) and not the little things that won't make a difference.

I still haven't seen anyone comment on the 60 percent firearm suicide rate.

Do you not care that more people kill themselves with guns than kill other people with guns because it doesn't fit your agenda?

Taking away the guns in 60 percent of those deaths would likely not reduce it at all.

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Posted

I still haven't seen anyone comment on the 60 percent firearm suicide rate.

Do you not care that more people kill themselves with guns than kill other people with guns because it doesn't fit your agenda?

Taking away the guns in 60 percent of those deaths would likely not reduce it at all.

According to the Harvard School of Public Health that isn't true.

In the United States, suicides outnumber homicides almost two to one. Perhaps the real tragedy behind suicide deaths—about 30,000 a year, one for every 45 attempts—is that so many could be prevented. Research shows that whether attempters live or die depends in large part on the ready availability of highly lethal means, especially firearms.

A study by the Harvard School of Public Health of all 50 U.S. states reveals a powerful link between rates of firearm ownership and suicides. Based on a survey of American households conducted in 2002, HSPH Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management Matthew Miller, Research Associate Deborah Azrael, and colleagues at the School’s Injury Control Research Center (ICRC), found that in states where guns were prevalent—as in Wyoming, where 63 percent of households reported owning guns—rates of suicide were higher. The inverse was also true: where gun ownership was less common, suicide rates were also lower.

The lesson? Many lives would likely be saved if people disposed of their firearms, kept them locked away, or stored them outside the home. Says HSPH Professor of Health Policy David Hemenway, the ICRC’s director: “Studies show that most attempters act on impulse, in moments of panic or despair. Once the acute feelings ease, 90 percent do not go on to die by suicide.”

But few can survive a gun blast. That’s why the ICRC’s Catherine Barber has launched Means Matter, a campaign that asks the public to help prevent suicide deaths by adopting practices and policies that keep guns out of the hands of vulnerable adults and children. For details, visit www.meansmatter.org.

Barber, who co-directed the National Violent Injury Statistics System, has also developed free, self-paced, online workshops to help public officials, mental health service providers, and community groups put together suicide prevention programs and policies. To take advantage of this joint effort by HSPH and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, visit http://training.sprc.org. — Karin Kiewra

http://www.hsph.harv...ns-and-suicide/

this is from the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

Background: The current investigation explores the association between rates of household firearm ownership and suicide across the 50 states. Prior ecologic research on the relationship between firearm prevalence and suicide has been criticized for using problematic proxy-based, rather than survey-based, estimates of firearm prevalence and for failing to control for potential psychological risk factors for suicide. We address these two criticisms by using recently available state-level survey-based estimates of household firearm ownership, serious mental illness, and alcohol/illicit substance use and dependence.

Methods: Negative binomial regression was used to assess the relationship between household firearm ownership rates and rates of firearm, nonfirearm, and overall suicide for both sexes and for four age groups. Analyses controlled for rates of poverty, urbanization, unemployment, mental illness, and drug and alcohol dependence and abuse.

Results: US residents of all ages and both sexes are more likely to die from suicide when they live in areas where more households contain firearms. A positive and significant association exists between levels of household firearm ownership and rates of firearm and overall suicide; rates of nonfirearm suicide were not associated with levels of household firearm ownership.

Conclusion: Household firearm ownership levels are strongly associated with higher rates of suicide, consistent with the hypothesis that the availability of lethal means increases the rate of completed suicide.

http://journals.lww.com/jtrauma/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2007&issue=04000&article=00031&type=abstract

and also this from the New England Journal of Medicine

Results

In the first year after the purchase of a handgun, suicide was the leading cause of death among handgun purchasers, accounting for 24.5 percent of all deaths and 51.9 percent of deaths among women 21 to 44 years old. The increased risk of suicide by any method among handgun purchasers (standardized mortality ratio, 4.31) was attributable entirely to an excess risk of suicide with a firearm (standardized mortality ratio, 7.12). In the first week after the purchase of a handgun, the rate of suicide by means of firearms among purchasers (644 per 100,000 person-years) was 57 times as high as the adjusted rate in the general population. Mortality from all causes during the first year after the purchase of a handgun was greater than expected for women (standardized mortality ratio, 1.09), and the entire increase was attributable to the excess number of suicides by means of a firearm. As compared with the general population, handgun purchasers remained at increased risk for suicide by firearm over the study period of up to six years, and the excess risk among women in this cohort (standardized mortality ratio, 15.50) remained greater than that among men (standardized mortality ratio, 3.23). The risk of death by homicide with a firearm was elevated among women (standardized mortality ratio at one year, 2.20; at six years, 2.01) but low among men (standardized mortality ratio at one year, 0.84; at six years, 0.79).

Full Text of Results...

Conclusions

The purchase of a handgun is associated with a substantial increase in the risk of suicide by firearm and by any method. The increase in the risk of suicide by firearm is apparent within a week after the purchase of a handgun and persists for at least six years.

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Posted

I was speaking based on a person's decision to use a firearm to kill themselves. If they are that far gone, I'm assuming they will do it anyway. Do you have a statistic that verifies that failed gun suicides go on to die by suicide?

Yes, I know that few can survive a gun blast to the head. But, hypothetically, if they are too far gone or mentally unstable enough to place that gun to their head and pull the trigger, are they not too far gone, period?

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Posted

I was replying before you added the last bit... but...

There is a reason that most places have waiting periods and background checks (IF the people purchase legally) for handguns. This is to curb any potential situation that leads to malicious desire to purchase said firearm.

Obviously, people who still harbor feelings strong enough to shoot themselves after that period is up, or after even 6 years, are too far gone to be saved.

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Posted

I was speaking based on a person's decision to use a firearm to kill themselves. If they are that far gone, I'm assuming they will do it anyway. Do you have a statistic that verifies that failed gun suicides go on to die by suicide?

Yes, I know that few can survive a gun blast to the head. But, hypothetically, if they are too far gone or mentally unstable enough to place that gun to their head and pull the trigger, are they not too far gone, period?

Not sure if this answers your question, but the Harvard report stated this:

“Studies show that most attempters act on impulse, in moments of panic or despair. Once the acute feelings ease, 90 percent do not go on to die by suicide.”

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