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Full Disclosure: I CAN'T Get a Job


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#46 Delhommey

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:03 PM

I was a hiring manager for a bit, and even now I have some say in who we hire in my current company there's one trend I keep seeing: Younger people seem to see a college degree as a job coupon, redeemable at their local company for one free job.

If you can't find a place where you can redeem that one? Well just go get a bigger coupon (M.B.A. or other advance degree).

When I was hiring there were certain skills that were necessary (you had to be outgoing as it was sales) but the big thing I wanted proof you were going to be bright and work hard and not call in every other Monday.

The big thing is figure out what you do that you enjoy doing, and figure out how to make that into a living. That may involve slogging at $8.50 /hr. When I realized I was in a field/company that was going nowhere, I jumped and took a 25% pay cut. 2 years later, I've made all that back up and plenty more, all while being in a field that I can walk out my front door, take a right, and find a new job. It's also one I (usually) love doing.

Granted, I'm in a much better job market than most people, but still. No, you can't toil away at meaningless jobs for no reason but you'll need to pay bills in the meantime. And that may mean taking a wage lower than you'd like. Nothing is better than something.

However, to get into a field that you want to get into, you'll probably have to take less than you want. As far as a college degree, they're nice to have, but they only mean so much in the end. My boss and my boss's boss have a HS degree and a technical degree from DeVry respectively. And this is in a very technical, very data driven industry (SEO/SEM). They managed, like so many in the tech industry, to be very bright and get into a growing industry early.

Figure out what you want, and do whatever's necessarily to get it. It's that simple, but extremely difficult to do.

#47 Crixtala

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:44 PM

I didn't even go to college but I'm working at sales at Gander Mountain and I'm rolling in the dough


i'm gonna need that hookup. thanks

#48 DC Amp

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:57 PM

come work at dish. you start off at $14.5/hr. paid training. Only qualifications is good driving record, HS diploma/ged, and can lift 100 pounds. You will work 4 days a week, normally about 11 hrs a day. full benefits and $70 credit per month to go toward your dish tv bill. you can earn up to a $200 bonus each check based on your productivity. There are many other perks such as discounts on cell phone etc. I receive an 18% discount with sprint for being a dish employee. Dish is always hiring and the office is located off of Tyvola in charlotte. you can go here to apply. http://careers.dish.com/


I gave you rep to offset a neg someone left, My question is why in the hell would anyone neg someone trying to help? This kind of attitude is why I don't come here much anymore.

Dish is a good way to make some decent money but you do have to be on your toes to get the jobs knocked out. The bonuses are easy to get if you just do your jobs and keep your numbers up.

#49 Herbert The Love Bug

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:27 PM

i'm gonna need that hookup. thanks


there are 3 stores opening in the area. They are hiring all positions like crazy right now. Just go to the website and apply. base pay + commission

#50 TheRumGone

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:32 PM

I was fortunate enough to get a job in college that paid 13 bucks an hour/40 hours a week for a fortune 500 company. It was warehouse work, but it allowed me to go out with my friends, buy everyone drinks, and spend money the way most college students dream about. I worked my ass off at the job, became friends with the management and propelled myself to assistant manager by my senior year. When I graduated, i worked there for a little less than a year learning as much as a possibly could about how the company is run inside and out and how to manage people. I was offered a ridiculous salary for someone right out of college in a city up North. I managed one section of the Second largest warehouse in North America. Managing 40 people at a time, fast paced, in a very holistic manner (if that makes sense). I was living it big, living in a large city with an apartment downtown (for a 23 year old I thought this was the dream), but I wasn't happy. I didn't enjoy what I was doing, and I was stressed out all the time. City life was awesome, but I couldn't really enjoy it with the amount of stress that job put me through.

So I quit. I told my bosses that my heart wasn't in it anymore, and that i didn't want to lead this life. I wanted something more fufilling. We have one life to live, why waste your time? They respected me for coming up to them and expressing myself that way, and both wrote me letters of recommendations and wished me well on my future endeavors.

Now I'm living in the mountains in a cabin, working contractor work with a family members company, and enjoying every second of my life. I've saved enough money that I am planning a cross country trip out to where I grew up with plans of emerging myself in the city and finding what the hell i want to do with my life. I'm excited and nervous but I wouldn't have it any other way. This was the best decision I could have possibly made.

With that said, I know you have a wife and kids to think about, but it's all about finding a balance between what you want to do and what you can take. I'm fortunate to be at an age where I can do this, but hopefully this gives you some support for following your dreams, following what you are passionate about and never letting anybody tell you what you can or can't do.

#51 Crixtala

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:39 PM

there are 3 stores opening in the area. They are hiring all positions like crazy right now. Just go to the website and apply. base pay + commission


i meant that employee discount, but nice to know there's three more opening... i hate driving all the way up to mooresville

#52 R0CKnR0LLA

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 05:59 PM

come work at dish. you start off at $14.5/hr. paid training. Only qualifications is good driving record, HS diploma/ged, and can lift 100 pounds. You will work 4 days a week, normally about 11 hrs a day. full benefits and $70 credit per month to go toward your dish tv bill. you can earn up to a $200 bonus each check based on your productivity. There are many other perks such as discounts on cell phone etc. I receive an 18% discount with sprint for being a dish employee. Dish is always hiring and the office is located off of Tyvola in charlotte. you can go here to apply. http://careers.dish.com/


Just curious, what do you have to lift that's 100 pounds working there?

#53 chknwing

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:02 PM

nothing 100 pounds per say but we lift ladders, spools of cable daily as well as bags of concrete and cement blocks for temporary mounts. also some dishes are quite heavy.

#54 Boner Champ

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:48 PM

Idk BC, I try to be honest with myself in everything I do and I wouldn't call it entitlement. That may very well be what it is, but it's not what it feels like. It's more like, I've put in the work so all I'm asking for is a little kickback - which isn't necessarily the best approach either.

Man, prior to college, I worked so many jobs I can't even count, literally. It probably is well over 20. Some I don't even remember. One example: I worked with a landscaper for two entire days. I had just moved in with my uncle down in Greenville, SC due to some family issues. He said they knew them through their church and they sent me off with them... I was 18. I spend the entire first day weed eating a commercial lot in the heat of mid-summer - no hat or anything. I get sunburned. They pick me up the next day, I ride off with them, and they take me out to some huge office complex, walk around, tell me to pick all of the weeds by hand out of pinestraw around the huge building. I start doing it, come to find out, they say they have something else to do and leave me out there. I end up having to call my uncle to pick me up from the location because they didn't come back and I never got paid for it. They were a legit business - business cards, advertising, trucks, everything, and I was working with the owner. They never even tried to get up with me to pay me for those days. A couple weeks later, I took a job with Wendy's, I worked 3 hours. I moved back home to Fayetteville the next day, and obviously never went back. LOL.

So, I wouldn't call it a sense of entitlement. I went through the wringer man and I'm not looking to get strung along again. If you want me to come in and work my way up, I got you. No one will outwork me. But, don't tell me you're going to move me into management and then treat me like Cinderella while you sit around and shoot the breeze with my peers.

Perhaps that is a problem I have to overcome, but I feel I'm worth a little more now as a graduate from a prestigious university than I was as a high school dropout with no structured support system. I think I have a right to feel that way, but it doesn't mean it will resonate with others.

But, I think that kind of lends itself to the whole "background being dicey" thing. When you've spent your life working dead-end, menial paying jobs, what are you going to talk about in an interview with a private financial services firm? "This one time, I got an 'Outstanding Team Player' certificate at Home Depot because I came in when it wasn't my shift and emptied out all the trash in 5 minutes." So, in regards to the interviews now, you're right... In the professional ones, there's no doubt in my mind that I'm not "killing it" because I'm lacking experience, so I can't really speak on specific questions they ask me regarding what I've already done.

As far as retail jobs, I KNOW I'm killing it, but when they're looking to hire someone for $8.50 and see I'm asking for $14 at the least, then I'm pretty sure that "kills" the interview for them.

I'm humble, but I'm smart, I work hard, and I know my worth. Too often, people are looking to take advantage of others and perhaps I'm over vigilant and it comes off as brash to some. I don't know...


Nothing about anything you just said makes you sound "humble", i hope you realize this. It almost sounds like you are proud of the fact that you have worked over 20 jobs....if someone seriously said to me in an interview they "have worked for over 20 companies....3 hours here, and 2 days there", I would never hire them. Also, no one cares that you have worked hard elsewhere. Obviously you didn't succeed in that system, otherwise you would have stayed with a company, and moved up in the ranks.

I'm really not trying to sound like a dick, and am honestly trying to give you sound advise. I know it may not be what you want to hear, but you started this thread.

#55 Cyberjag

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 07:22 PM

So basically, read Zod's threads to get an idea of how much you need to work at it, and Delhommey's to get an idea of the importance of choosing the right career. I could bore you with my own personal experiences, but they've already hit the high points.

Want to write for a living? Then write, and keep writing until someone pays you for it. Want to take pictures? Ditto. Like building stuff? Go build and work your ass off--you'll get paid well eventually. Go restore cars. And in the meantime, take a shit job that you hate but which will pay the bills in the interim.

Education used to be a genuine ticket, but that's because it served two purposes. First, it actually trained you well in various disciplines. Second, it was a marker for the more ambitious and intelligent people out there. Now, everyone and his brother have a BA, and getting an Masters in anything has been cheapened to the point where if you don't go to a top school, all you've accomplished is gaining an ego boost and a piece of paper.

Figure out what you want to do, and go do it. And do it CONSTANTLY, until you're so unbelievably good at it that someone decides to pay you to do it for them. It's really that simple.

#56 Cyberjag

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 07:24 PM

BTW, I had a series of truly terrible jobs in the early 80s, until I turned a hobby into a job that paid for college. And then in the 90s, I again went through some crap work to get the experience I needed to actually get into my chosen field. Five years ago I made a huge shift in what I was doing, one that came with a 30% pay cut. Now I enjoy more success than I've ever had. It's all about hard work and patience.

Get some. :)

#57 Scrumtrilescent

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 07:44 PM

The education bit is dependent on the field you are interested in honestly. For most business industries, I totally agree that a BS/BA is about as meaningful as a Subway Sandwich Artist Diploma, and a MBA is about the same. In the hard sciences, education is still the first and largest barrier to entry. Of course, if you want to spend 4+ years past your undergrad degree in a particular field, you are usually at least somewhat sure as to your career trajectory. It's a very all in field, you can't just go halfway or you'll end up in a dead end like Office Space just like every other corporate gig. But I'll be the first to stand up and shout please don't go degree grabbing just for the sake of going back to school. The stink of a professional student is almost as bad as a job nomad.

#58 Proudiddy

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:32 PM

Nothing about anything you just said makes you sound "humble", i hope you realize this. It almost sounds like you are proud of the fact that you have worked over 20 jobs....if someone seriously said to me in an interview they "have worked for over 20 companies....3 hours here, and 2 days there", I would never hire them. Also, no one cares that you have worked hard elsewhere. Obviously you didn't succeed in that system, otherwise you would have stayed with a company, and moved up in the ranks.

I'm really not trying to sound like a dick, and am honestly trying to give you sound advise. I know it may not be what you want to hear, but you started this thread.

The point of telling you about those two jobs in particular was that I was dealt a crappy hand most places I went, had horrible experiences that most people I know didn't have to put up with, and I have worked so many jobs that I CAN'T share all of those experiences with employers because it doesn't reflect well on me. So, I have to, like a resume, share the few highlights I do have.

The best job I ever had was my last one, in a professional setting, through my college. They treated me well, and I did good work for them in return. They loved me and always talked about me glowingly, and I do the same for them. I still talk with my supervisor from that job. That was the FIRST job in my life that rewarded me for hard work and respected me. They treated me as a human being, not a faceless slave. I don't care if that sounds humble or not, it's the truth.

Imagine Steve Smith working a 9-5. That was me as a teenager. So, I've grown up quite a bit, but I didn't take any crap if it wasn't equally dealt across the board to everyone. Yes, everyone has ups and downs, but I'm talking about a systematic dumping on one person. But, to say I sound proud about having 20 jobs, well yeah, that's not something I tell prospective employers, but it is a sort of badge of honor among those who know me, lol. It's a joke. But, in personal conversations I'm not going to shy away from it because it molded me and again I endured some hard times and unbelievable circumstances in the process. And it wasn't 20 "companies," I worked for people who didn't pay me because I had to take it in order to get by. I even stocked shelves getting paid literal CHANGE (under the table) at a commissary by independent vendors. I'd say that is a humbling experience.

If you do work for someone somewhere and after the fact, they don't pay you, are you gonna stay there? If you work in a factory getting paid $6 an hour and they take money out of your check for being 5 minutes late, but you're the one that calls the Dept. of Labor on them out of a plant full of grown men, are you gonna keep that job? Are you gonna tell people about it? If you started a job somewhere that requires you to come to work overnight and pay you .25 a case that you stock, and then you come in and they only have 30 cases, are you gonna stay there? That's what I was dealing with.

So, I couldn't list all the employers I had even if I wanted, because some couldn't even be verified.

Now, I have credentials that command some level of respect, and I'm willing to work just as hard - I'm just not getting the chances. But, I'm not going to go into an interview and say "I changed jobs like underwear. I had over 20 of them, above and under the table. I got treated like crap or misled about pay or positions, so I left a lot of them. So, when do I start?"

Out of all the people I have known throughout my life, none have had any sort of employment experiences even remotely close to mine. So, it's tough to know I've had these unique experiences as well, yet I can't share all of those or any at all with prospective employers to demonstrate growth.

No offense BC, I'm just sharing that here. It's not what I would want to put on my business cards.

#59 Baby Andy Reid

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:41 PM

If you worked for me for two days and quit i probably wouldnt make an effort to find you and pay you either. And how is working three hours at a wendys taking your lumps? I think your problem is you think more of yourself then potential employers do. If $8.50 is what they are willing to pay why would they give you $14.00, just because you think you deserve it? When i was in high school my dad was bringing in about 150k a year. His company downsized three or four times and finally he was laid off as well. He took a job making 13.50 an hour until he could find something better. Eventually you will get where you want to be, but you have to start somewhere man. If you start somewhere at 8.50 and prove your worth it will all work out.

#60 Proudiddy

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:51 PM

If you worked for me for two days and quit i probably wouldnt make an effort to find you and pay you either. And how is working three hours at a wendys taking your lumps? I think your problem is you think more of yourself then potential employers do. If $8.50 is what they are willing to pay why would they give you $14.00, just because you think you deserve it? When i was in high school my dad was bringing in about 150k a year. His company downsized three or four times and finally he was laid off as well. He took a job making 13.50 an hour until he could find something better. Eventually you will get where you want to be, but you have to start somewhere man. If you start somewhere at 8.50 and prove your worth it will all work out.

Apparently that example wasn't taken the way I intended it to be. I lived in SC for about 3 months and basically was sent there by my family. My uncle demanded I take the jobs to give me something to do. The landscaper was supposed to pay me by the day. They didn't. The second day, they dropped me off at a site and left me there, which was not planned, to pick weeds out of landscaping and they did no other work there IIRC. So, I didn't go back. It was very sketchy those two days I was with them and I never even filled out any paperwork, yet it was a "connection" through their church. They didn't pay me for the work I did and made no effort to contact me after the fact.

I went to Wendy's after, thinking I would be staying there longer than 3 months, and found out I was getting sent back home, which I was ready for at that point... So, I never went back and didn't get paid for that either. Mind you, I was an 18 year old HS dropout who was told I would end up in prison or dead by my HS coach (despite never being in trouble with the law). That story was to illustrate the extremes that I dealt with and how I had two worthless jobs that I wasn't paid for in just a month or two's time frame, even though I didn't do anything to hasten that. That is all.

I didn't give that as an example of "taking my lumps."

It's possible that I think more of myself than they do. But, when did confidence become a negative? I also say that my wage rate is negotiable when I go to those interviews. But, how insulting is it to offer me a wage that I made before I even went to college? Doesn't that count for anything? Why don't you put me in the fast track to work my way up into a better position because of that instead of offering me 8.50 to decorate cakes? There's a difference between being humbled and being an idiot, and admittedly, I must not be doing a good job of differentiating.


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