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Full Disclosure: I CAN'T Get a Job


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#91 twylyght

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 12:05 PM

Thanks to PD for making a worthwhile commiseration of people possible for the first time in a long time. What you've done took serious guts, and the heart of this huddle responded well enough to get this bastard (me) to appreciate and love what makes this place worth it.

I propose a PD campaign to get this guy where he wants to be faster. If you don't have a LinkedIn account, get one and post it to people you know and trust. They can tangibly put their stamp on their experiences with you to attest to your character. The rest of us can keep an eye out and ear down for opportunities that may be of interest to you and then get them to you by pm'ing you or posting it directly here for your consideration.

If you aren't averse to that, post what you are genuinely seeking and we can make this huddle work for you mon ami

#92 thefuzz

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 12:07 PM

PD, it seems that you have gotten your head on straight, since the start of this thread, but I wanted to add a couple things to what others have said that really scare me about your ability to shoot up the ladder.

You said that you hated networking/ass kissing. Get over it, and get good at both of them, and I mean really good. That stuff didn't come naturally to me, and I came from a poor family and now work in a world full of big wigs. I am able to hang because I networked, made friends, and stuck my neck out when I had to.

I'm serious here, what is on that resume and on that degree, mean squat once you are in front of people, and they are asking you questions. Literally college means nothing unless you are in a very specific industry once you are past the HR people.

Secondly, just to share my little story with you, I too got out of school and didn't know what I was going to do, I started bartending, and one of my regulars asked me if I wanted a "real job". I met with him the next day and he offered me $9.00 per hour plus some bonuses if I did well. Pretty much nothing, but I decided to swallow my ego/pride and give it a shot.

Felt like I was stuck there forever, and all I did was make cold calls for him to get him business. It sucked, I hated it, but I had found a profession that I thought I could like and do for a long time. I worked harder than anyone else, didn't take time off, didn't take a vacation, and didn't ever call in.

After 18 months of this terrible job, I got promoted to my bosses equal. My income jumped from 30K to 80K overnight. I was 23 years old. Now 8 years later I am still in the industry, and could walk from this job into another with just a phone call and a handshake. I do well enough to have a very good life in a town that many with my sames credentials barely make 40K.

All I am trying to say, is don't miss out on a opportunity just because you have a degree, or the fact that you think it's below you.

And for heaven sake, please start trying to hang out with folks that are better off than you are. I love my old friends, and see them often, but if you are only hanging with people who talk about their kids or the Panthers....you are in trouble. Get out of your comfort zone.

#93 Proudiddy

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 03:14 PM

Thanks to PD for making a worthwhile commiseration of people possible for the first time in a long time. What you've done took serious guts, and the heart of this huddle responded well enough to get this bastard (me) to appreciate and love what makes this place worth it.

I propose a PD campaign to get this guy where he wants to be faster. If you don't have a LinkedIn account, get one and post it to people you know and trust. They can tangibly put their stamp on their experiences with you to attest to your character. The rest of us can keep an eye out and ear down for opportunities that may be of interest to you and then get them to you by pm'ing you or posting it directly here for your consideration.

If you aren't averse to that, post what you are genuinely seeking and we can make this huddle work for you mon ami

PD, it seems that you have gotten your head on straight, since the start of this thread, but I wanted to add a couple things to what others have said that really scare me about your ability to shoot up the ladder.

You said that you hated networking/ass kissing. Get over it, and get good at both of them, and I mean really good. That stuff didn't come naturally to me, and I came from a poor family and now work in a world full of big wigs. I am able to hang because I networked, made friends, and stuck my neck out when I had to.

I'm serious here, what is on that resume and on that degree, mean squat once you are in front of people, and they are asking you questions. Literally college means nothing unless you are in a very specific industry once you are past the HR people.

Secondly, just to share my little story with you, I too got out of school and didn't know what I was going to do, I started bartending, and one of my regulars asked me if I wanted a "real job". I met with him the next day and he offered me $9.00 per hour plus some bonuses if I did well. Pretty much nothing, but I decided to swallow my ego/pride and give it a shot.

Felt like I was stuck there forever, and all I did was make cold calls for him to get him business. It sucked, I hated it, but I had found a profession that I thought I could like and do for a long time. I worked harder than anyone else, didn't take time off, didn't take a vacation, and didn't ever call in.

After 18 months of this terrible job, I got promoted to my bosses equal. My income jumped from 30K to 80K overnight. I was 23 years old. Now 8 years later I am still in the industry, and could walk from this job into another with just a phone call and a handshake. I do well enough to have a very good life in a town that many with my sames credentials barely make 40K.

All I am trying to say, is don't miss out on a opportunity just because you have a degree, or the fact that you think it's below you.

And for heaven sake, please start trying to hang out with folks that are better off than you are. I love my old friends, and see them often, but if you are only hanging with people who talk about their kids or the Panthers....you are in trouble. Get out of your comfort zone.


Thanks guys, it truly does mean a lot to me.

@Twylyght, I don't currently have a LinkedIn, but I'll get on it. I've just been skeptical of it, but the more apps I've filled out and resumes I've submitted, the more I'm seeing that it is VERY relevant to have. So, I'll be creating an account on there... As far as any help outside of the awesome advice the huddle has already offered me in this thread, I'd greatly appreciate anything anyone has to offer in forms of leads, someone you know, or whatever it may be.

@thefuzz, thanks man. You are right as well man. I often use my family as an excuse as to why I wouldn't go to many social events while I was in college. I went to some, mainly the ones I had to or was extremely interested in, I just despised the "fake" ones. But, I realize my mistake in staying in my comfort zone the further away I've gotten from college. I have some great contacts/references for my creative interests/pursuits, but I am sorely lack in the successful businessman-friend department.

And another thing you hit on that kind of ties into that... From where I came from, there are so many people that want to see me do badly. My own family takes snipes at me for going to college and breaking the mold. Some complain about having to "pay" for my schooling as red-blooded American taxpayers, some ask those questions like "so, you just decide you're not going to law school now?" You know, the kind of question that is more of a celebratory statement than an actual inquiry.

I digress, as always, but yeah man... I will start networking because I know it's necessary. And it doesn't always have to be formal, like pstall said, it could be through sports, a pickup game, or what have you. I just always liked to keep my personal time/interests separate from my business. But, it is necessary nowadays to combine them. As a matter of fact, I'm looking at joining the local Toastmaster group since this thread. I found classes they're giving through the local chamber of commerce class and I think it can really help me across the board.

#94 thefuzz

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 03:49 PM

PD, I promise you that you will not succeed in this World any longer by having a 9-5, and leaving the work at work....that is unless you want to make 45K for the rest of your life.

You can do it man, just don't let friends, family, ego, or pride get in the way.

#95 stankowalski

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:02 PM

Proudiddy, hang in there man. I can't give you advice because I'm in the same boat as you...lol. You and I sound pretty similar with respect to how you describe yourself. I can fit in with most people, but I absolutely loathe the idea of rubbing elbows to get ahead. I grew up in a family that was pretty much how you described. Blue collar workers. In fact I worked in a factory for 14 years before it closed down. I made decent money, not 6 figures, but I was very comfortable.

In any case, when the plant shut down the company paid for my college classes. I couldn't really decide what to do, so I first got an Associates in Network Systems Administration. Didn't really seem like something I really wanted to do, but I couldn't find a job in any case. Then I switched to get a Computer Engineering degree (Associate's), with a plan to transfer and pursue an Electronics Engineering degree. I'm almost finished with that (have one more class).

Now I did get a job that would work around my college schedule as an Electronics Technician at a small company in town here, but my thyroid gland went apeshit and I couldn't sleep (still experiencing this) and couldn't eat for about a week. I eventually had to quit that job because I didn't feel like I had the energy, and my concentration and memory were significantly impaired from the lack of sleep. Damn getting old. It seems like once you hit 40 everything breaks down.

In any case, you sound like a good dude, and I'm sure you'll find something soon.

#96 pstall

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:35 PM

just to add some more layers on networking. i play hoops first for fun, second for friendships. while keeping it in that order, oppurtunities will arise naturally and you won't have to kiss butt nor will you have to be fake and have an alterior motive.

many times once you get to know a crew of guys, you can begin to hear where they work, what they do, what they are looking for etc and in time, you too will be able to pull a guy up from where you stand once you build up a good network.

i had close to 1k friends on facebook before i exiled myself. that alone has made me focus on core relationships and not get bogged down.

find something that you can use as an anchor in terms of steady pay/benefits while you look ahead. i always say the best lessons in life are unintentional. we can overthink our path and try to line up everything to perfection and it doesn't always work that way.

find a place(s) to ball. in time that will snowball to bigger and better things and you will stay in shape and burn off some pent up agression at the same time.

#97 Zaximus

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 03:20 PM

Not sure if someone else said this, but, why not consider being a stay at home dad? You said your family is OK right now and you're saving money by watching the kids. Why not get a part-time gig for when your wife can watch them? I would totally be a stay at home dad if possible. My father was disabled pretty early in my life and because a stay at home dad, and it was awesome having him around, not missing sports practices, helping with homework, and generally just being around. Not sure if anyone mentioned this, but don't discredit taking on that role. It'll give you some time to think about what you want to do when your kids get old enough and you can move back into the workforce full time. This is a trend that is becoming more common for dads.

#98 Miaoww

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:50 PM

I hate to be blunt but you are not going to get the ideal job right off the bat. The college degree is not a bypass around low paying job. If you are bright, and it sounds like you are, the $8.50 an hour job at a grocery store shouldn't take you long to start moving up the ladder and then you will have experience on your resume.

Pretty much.

Worked at ASDA (owned by Walmart) as I earned my Journalism degree.

Continued to work there looking for jobs in the media industry for 18 months. Besides a few unpaid 'internships' I got nothing.

Ended up giving in and going into Sports Administration. Again a low paying, entry level job.

14 months later my boss considers me invaluable, but knows the company can't give me a pay rise - so he's doing his damndest to help me improve my CV (he's head of recruiting in the company) and helping me get my name out there.

He's going to give me a glowing reference - and coming from him that has some clout.


So long story short - don't be too proud to take a job that you consider beneath you. At the end of the day it's good experience and if you do it well you will be noticed. That will lead to better things and help you get where you want to go.

#99 pantherclaw

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:58 AM

I think the best advice has already been said.

Just wanted to share a personal story.
I worked for myself for 5 plus years before i left Alaska. Doing home computer repairs. i never had a degree.

When.i got down here in Galveston, I was just looking for work, period.
Took awhile before I got any offers. When I did get offers, none of them were ones I'd consider for a career.
I ended up taking a job in retail sales, as it was one of the best offers that kept me on island. While the first year was an experience in itself (include hurricane Ike),
Today i am grateful for.my job. I'm doing something I enjoy (who knew), and I'm providing for my family. While i still have a long term plan to work for myself, I'm on my way.

Get yourself a job, regardless what it is, and doors will open up.

#100 Jackofalltrades

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:26 AM

Degrees mean very little these days.

#101 hepcat

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:58 AM

Can't say anything that hasn't already been said but, hang in there. Things will get better. Make it a point to do something for yourself or your family every day that makes life a little better. Always remember to keep a positive attitude - it's invaluable.

The Charlotte job market is also pretty bad from what I hear. I'm spoiled because I'm in my mid 20's and I live in Austin, TX where the job market is healthy.

#102 SOJA

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:47 AM

Degrees mean very little these days.

as a college senior....poo

#103 captfluoro

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:44 PM

Really interesting thread and I hope the OP does well. I'm in a totally different area, medicine, so a degree was sort of necessary but what some people have said about networking struck up a memory for me. When I was in college getting ready to apply to med school one professor said to me that up until now it was what I know that is important but once out of med school it will be more who I know that will advance my career. But, since I don't really care to be a leading authority in my field and really don't like to schmooze that much, I'm content working in my little three man radiology group in a small 200 bed rural hospital. Good luck to you.

#104 Delhommey

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:57 PM

One thing more: there are almost no bad jobs if you have a good boss and almost no good ones if your boss is bad.


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