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WR Steve Smith from Iraq: 'A life-changing experience'

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Posted

I was with Fluor. The department I was with did O & M Services which we didn't provide at Salerno. The only service we provided was the Basic Life Support such as electrical, HVAC and plumbing.

People don't realize how Fugging cold it could get there as well as the summertime heat.

Man, the weather is ridiculous, and the desert doesn't retain heat, at all, so it'd be a good 115 degrees in the daytime, and like 30 at night. Jeez, and for us, the only way we weren't going to roll out on a mission was if the bowl wasn't clear, meaning if the choppers can fly, we're rolling out. Conditions, who cares? We were hunting for IEDs with a few feet of snow on the ground.

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Man, the weather is ridiculous, and the desert doesn't retain heat, at all, so it'd be a good 115 degrees in the daytime, and like 30 at night. Jeez, and for us, the only way we weren't going to roll out on a mission was if the bowl wasn't clear, meaning if the choppers can fly, we're rolling out. Conditions, who cares? We were hunting for IEDs with a few feet of snow on the ground.

Shank was one of my responsibilites and I went there a few times to administer our contracts. The last time I was there. They had a VBIED (in a dump truck) blew a hole in the perimeter. Destroyed every wooden structure and tent within about 1/4 mile. Amazingly there were zero fatalites of US Service members. Rumor was a couple local died. Amazing what those VBIED and IED can do.

You deserve the BRONZE BALLS Award that is for sure. Searching for IEDs in the Snow. That takes some serious balls. Appreciate the service, my friend.

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Posted

Love Smitty

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i would never begrudge someone like steve smith attaining some life-altering perspective visiting soldiers abroad, politics be damned. that is how you grow as a person.

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the only way Smitty or any of us could get a true appreciation for what the troops do is to do just exactly what he did. go VISIT them.

otherwise, from the safe confines of our home or pc, we can easily say what should have been done.

SS focus was correct. it was on the SOLDIERS.

right or wrong, the US is still the straw that stirs the drink.

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I was in the persian gulf (Saudi Arabia and Bahrain) during the 1994/1995 timeframe. There was no combat going on then, but I do remember the weather. 130 degrees during the day. It didn't get so cold at night in Bahrain, but I remember it started raining last week in jan, and didn't stop until march. And then it didn't rain again for a year. I remember sandstorms tearing up gear, and stinging like hell. I was so glad to get back in the States.

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14088070815

Somebody didn't do so hot on the ASVAB.

Try 138 with a $160,000 bas in accounting/auditing. Some of the smartest guys in the military are real soldiers. Your just mad because you know your a joke that lies to his family/spouse about their "combat" tours.

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Posted

That's gt. It was like a 99.

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Shank was one of my responsibilites and I went there a few times to administer our contracts. The last time I was there. They had a VBIED (in a dump truck) blew a hole in the perimeter. Destroyed every wooden structure and tent within about 1/4 mile. Amazingly there were zero fatalites of US Service members. Rumor was a couple local died. Amazing what those VBIED and IED can do.

You deserve the BRONZE BALLS Award that is for sure. Searching for IEDs in the Snow. That takes some serious balls. Appreciate the service, my friend.

Thanks much, man. I enjoyed my time in and would do it 200 times again if need be. VBIED's are horrible, they can pack so much more explosives that way, and then of course, the vehicle turns to shrapnel, so yea, definitely a weapon that they like to use when they have the chance. Glad you made it back from the sand box as well. Takes a very strong person to go there, military, civilian, contractor, in whatever entity.

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Believe me when I tell you, these USO tours are morale boosters, specially to the football fans in the military. Only thing I was ever on the fob for as far as things they do for soldiers, had a mission one day, banged it all quick like, got back to the fob in time for chow, and man, they had Outback Steakhouse in the DFAC a long with some lovely women, can't remember who the women were, but they were sexy, and that's about all that mattered to us.

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Try 138 with a $160,000 bas in accounting/auditing. Some of the smartest guys in the military are real soldiers. Your just mad because you know your a joke that lies to his family/spouse about their "combat" tours.

LMAO

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Posted

Good for Smitty! My first of 7 and counting Combat Tours was Iraq, and it will definitely change your life.

Regardless of the political sentiment in this country or the conspiracy theories, it feels good to know that one of my heroes (Smitty) thinks that I'm a hero.

I'm 29 right now and will turn 30 later on this year. I joined when I was 18. I have fast tracked my entire career because I'm very good at what I do, both technically and tactically. I've been with some of the most prestigious Units in all of the military, and now I find myself "fixing" one of the worst Units.

As of late, I myself have begun to question what's really going on. I have lost many close friends throughout the years. Luckily, I still have all 10 toes, and all 10 fingers. I have been extremely blessed and even very lucky several times. No matter what has happened or why we were sent... All that matters is that WE have been sent again and again and again!!!

I've known people that have missed the births of their First child, missed their own parents' funerals, gotten divorced... The list goes on and on. Military families sacrifice a lot. I don't expect anyone who hasn't served to be able to understand it. Imagine not seeing your spouse or sleeping in the same bed for over a year. Imagine missing your kids birth, first steps, first words... I can't even finish this...

If you know someone who has served, buy them a drink, buy their meal. Or if you can't afford it, just stop and genuinely thank them for their service. Don't just say "thank you" say it and mean it. There is a difference, and again anyone who has served can tell.

To all my brothers and sisters in arms, both past and present... I sincerely Thank each and every one of you for all that you have sacrificed over the years, no matter your occupational specialty, we have all made great sacrifices and gone to great lengths to keep our families and friends a priority no matter where we have been. We have all become family whether we liked it or not, and that can never be taken from us.

As for Smitty, I can't wait to see what he does for soldiers this year. When something really touches him, he always goes to great lengths to give back. It truly has been awesome seeing him mature over the last several years. I wish him nothing but the best.

"De Oppresso Liber"

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