Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Squirrel

Why Passing on a WR in the first might not be a option

Recommended Posts

koolkatluke    474

Overall Football Traits

Production 1 Hutchinson C.C. 2010: Receiving 52-908-9 KOR/PRs 21-645-3Hutchinson C.C. 2011: Receiving 61-924-15 Rushing: 32-379-6 KORs: 10-482-3Tennessee 2012: (12/12) Receiving: 46-778-5. Rushing: 25-308-3. KORs: 24-671-1 PRs: 4-101-1. 1,858 all-purpose yards (school single-season record) Height-Weight-Speed 1 Freakishly gifted athlete. Has ideal height and adequate bulk. Can continue to get stronger. Top-end speed appears on tape to be elite for size. Durability 2 Started all 12 games during only season at UT. Missed practice time in summer of 2012 with a shoulder sprain. Intangibles 4 First name pronounced: CORE-dare-uhl. From Rock Hill, SC and went to Northwestern High School, where he won D-II state championship as a senior in 2008. Spent 2009 at North Carolina Tech but did not play football. Two-time NFCAA All-American at Hutchinson Community College (KS) before transferring to Tennessee in 2012. No off-the-field incidents that would raise red flag. Academics have always been a challenge and NFL scouts are closely studying his ability to retain information. Is a bit shy and introverted. Ideally, he will be drafted by a team with good leadership on the offensive side of the ball.

1 = Exceptional2 = Above average3 = Average4 = Below average5 = Marginal

Wide Receiver Specific Traits

Separation Skills 3 Outstanding size-speed combination gives him natural separation ability. But raw as a route runner. Rarely gains separation due to savvy or crispness of route. Can look lost at times versus zone coverage. Has a lot to learn about the NFL passing game, especially reading coverages and making site adjustments. Must also improve hand usage versus press. Struggles to get a clean release and takes too many false steps getting off the line. Ball Skills 2 Excellent natural hand-eye coordination. Shows very good body control and ability to adjust to the ball while elevated. Long arms, big hands and can make the difficult catch over his head. Suffers occasional lapse in focus, usually when trying to get up the field before securing the ball. Dropped a sure-fire TD versus Georgia. Big play ability 1 Elite combination of size, fluidity and top-end speed. More dangerous with ball in hands than as a vertical route runner, but can still take the top off a defense. Accelerates quickly when getting up the field after catch, and shows a big-league extra gear. Absolute pursuit-angle killer. Can stick his foot in ground and accelerate like a running back. Has very good lateral agility. Competitiveness 4 Hungry and competitive when the ball is in his hands but very questionable effort otherwise. Does not show fear going over the middle. Ran hard when UT put him in backfield. Versatile athlete that can contribute in many different areas receiver, runner, return specialist. Also has a surprisingly strong/accurate arm. However, he does not run routes with same desire every time. Is clearly coasting from time to time. Does not work hard enough in preparation and does not pay attention to detail. Blocking effort is spotty. Doesn't shy away from contact but not a physical player, either.

1 = Exceptional2 = Above average3 = Average4 = Below average5 = Marginal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
koolkatluke    474

http://www.nfl.com/draft/2013/profiles/cordarrelle-patterson?id=2540145

Weaknesses

Consistently a body catcher, even when it is not necessary. Was not frequently asked to go up and get the football at its highest point. Large number of his snaps start while off the line of scrimmage, allows for a better release. Doesn't use his hands enough against a jam, tries to dip or side step rather than slap or push. Tends to throttle down in his breaks.Burst after the catch or return is only adequate but does accelerate quickly. Tries to do too much when the ball is in his hands at times. Dropped a few very catchable balls, including easy bucket throw over shoulder. Inconsistent blocking effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




koolkatluke    474

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1996183

WEAKNESSES: Patterson is still developing as a route-runner and will tip his patterns at times. He is a natural hands-catcher, but will have some concentration lapses and drop some easy ones, running before securing the reception.

Patterson needs to scale back his physicality downfield, often extending his arms downfield against tight coverage and getting away with some push-offs. He has a bad habit of stopping his feet when running room isn't there, always searching for the home run instead of taking what's there.

Patterson has made some mistakes on punt returns, allowing the ball to go over his head or catching the punt too close to the goal line. He has just one year of experience at the FBS-level, albeit a productive one season.

COMPARES TO: Mix of Dwayne Bowe, Kansas City Chiefs and Nate Burleson, Detroit Lions - Patterson has a similar frame and physical downfield nature as Bowe with the speed and quickness of Burleson to contribute as a return man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carpanfan96    1,458

I already posted both of those and the NFL profile is the one that says he's one of the most physically gifted WR's of the past few drafts with a high football IQ, his route running is easily fixable. He had a extremely high catch percentage while at UT, so those mental lapses are few and far between. Everyone knows that his route running isn't great, but that's fixable. His size and speed isn't teachable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaCityKats    1,262

Silva isn't the be all in scouting and their is a different opinion shared by Kevin Weidel, Mcshay, and others about his route running and his ability to handle a lot of information. You choose not to see that like you did last year with Stephen Hill.

stephen hill and cordarrelle are 2 different prospects.one is considered the top wr while the other was not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tiger7_88    13,485

Just because it is 'deep', does it mean it is good.

This draft class is full of #2-3 WR. Only a handful are considered to be #1 and even then they aren't a solid option.

I agree.

Which is why using the 14th overall pick for a #1 that may not even be a solid option is a bad idea IMO.

Know what's a good idea to build a solid basis for a team? Linemen linemen linemen...

  • Pie 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
panthers55    5,132

This is why drafting WR in the first round is a bad idea. THis was an article before the 2011 draft.

http://sports.espn.g...tory?id=6396194

If your team is considering drafting A.J. Green orJulio Jones, you might want to start worrying. And if that's not enough, remember that the Detroit Lions spent four top-10 picks between 2003 and 2007 on wide receivers and only one of those picks is still with the team.

The increase in passing and wide receiver usage has naturally led to an increase in wide receivers selected in the first round. From 2001 to 2010, wide receivers were the second-most drafted players in the first round, trailing only defensive backs (both corners and safeties).

The 40 first-round picks since 2001 have combined to play 199 seasons in the NFL. Only 41 of those 199 seasons (20.6 percent) saw the receiver eclipse 1,000 receiving yards. Only 17 of the 40 receivers have registered a 1,000-yard season and just nine have done it more than once.

Even if you were to ignore their rookie seasons to account for an NFL learning curve, you'd have 159 seasons and 40 1,000-yard seasons (25.2 percent). Michael Clayton was the only receiver of the group with a 1,000-yard season his rookie year and he never had more than 484 in a season after that.

No other position drafted since 2001 has seen a higher percentage of players inactive in 2010. Eleven of the 40 first-round receivers did not play in a game last season, meaning 72.5 percent of all first-round receivers played. Defensive backs (79.3 percent) were the only other position to dip below 80 percent.

Those 11 wide receivers averaged 5.1 seasons in their careers. Five of those receivers played their last games in or prior to 2006. Only two other offensive players drafted in 2001 or later (running back William Green and tackleKenyatta Walker) were out by 2006.

When thinking of the difference between a first-round receiver and a second-round-or-later receiver, one 20-yard catch per game probably isn't what comes to mind, but players like Greg Jennings, Chad Ochocinco, Vincent Jackson, Anquan Boldin, Brandon Marshall and Mike Wallace(among others) have helped close that gap.

A.J. Green and Julio Jones are the only two wide receivers projected to go in the first round this month, according to both Todd McShay's and Mel Kiper's most recent mock drafts. Both could translate to 1,000-yard talents, but statistically speaking, each has only a one-in-four shot to be a real difference maker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
top dawg    8,623

I have been a big supporter of trading down or drafting a WR in the 2nd round. But it is looking like if we wait til the 2nd round there might not be a viable WR at the 44th pick.

Most of you think I have been on the bandwagon to draft Austin at 14 because Im labeled a WVU Homer. That wasnt the case until now. I would much prefer us to trade down to the mid 20 picks and grab a extra pick in the 2nd or 3rd round. But that most likely wont happen. Looking at the latest mocks a lot of WR thought to be avaible at the 44th pick are moving up to the late first round.

So with said the 14th pick should be Austin or Patterson. If we can trade down to the mid 20's then we can grab either Hunter , Hopkins or Allen. To me we need to grab one of these in the draft. Honestly I couldnt care which one but anything past them wont help us down the road.

I am not necessary thinking that we have to draft 89's heir apparent this year, but I do think that we need someone who can at least bridge the gap. Someone like Swope or Patterson would probably most certainly help us not only down the road, but in the coming year. As long as we got 89, we don't have to address needs at WR in one fell swoop. Austin or Patterson likely wouldn't be the complete answer to our problems at WR, but I would still take one of them (esp. Austin).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frash.exe    10,817

you see... BOTH OF THOSE RECEIVERS WHO HAVE AVERAGED OVER 1,000 REC. YARDS PER SEASON HAVE A ONE IN FOUR CHANCE OF SUCCEEDING IN THE NFL!

oh, ESPN, when was the last time you were dead on about something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×