Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Is Julius Peppers the greatest player in Panthers history?

483 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

oh...and the best panther would be one who didn't quit on his team. you know, like peppers did.


btw...CJ is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I may be wrong here but was peppers a ghost in every playoff game? Im not sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

He might be the Part-Time Greatest player.... Evarrrrrrr.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Best defensive player... abso-friggin'-lutely, despite what his haters here say...

Best player... No... That's Smitty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I heard he didn't like living here and that's why he left. Chicago is a world renown city and he's just another guy in a city like that.

One thing about Pep - he has greatness giving to him. He makes it look easy man. However, very frustrating player to watch. I still remember that 2.5 sack season he had. This dude should average 20 sacks a season.

We over payed for Charles Johnson but I do believe they kept the right DE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I miss Peppers a little, but every season that ends without him winning a ring makes me miss him less.
Smitty is the best player in Panthers history, imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I don't miss him.

He played some great years for us, yes...but he's heading towards the twilight of his career. He can still play but for what he wanted, Carolina wasn't going to work for him anymore.

I'm perfectly happy with the CJ/Kraken/Alexander rotation we have now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

The fish are biting on this obvious troll thread!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='ButWhysTheRumGone' timestamp='1365788610' post='2193064']
Julius Peppers was a lazy bitch. Beason called his ass out on it.
[/quote]

Thats a load of BS there bud. The media in Carolina made that crap up about Peppers and some of the stupid fans bought that crap up, I think that is a major reason Peppers left, because he didn't feel appreciated in Carolina.

[url="http://www.catscratchreader.com/2008/4/5/224349/7282"]http://www.catscratc...4/5/224349/7282[/url]

Seriously, we do know that Peppers had an undisclosed illness during training camp that caused him to miss some time. One rumor was that the medication he was taking made him lethargic and affected his aggressiveness. We still don’t know for sure what the illness was which I find a little strange.

[url="http://espn.go.com/blog/chicago/bears/post/_/id/4669770/trgovac-nothing-wrong-with-peppers-motor"]http://espn.go.com/b...h-peppers-motor[/url]

"He had it [the reputation] coming out of college," Trgovac said Tuesday at Super Bowl media day. "I always attribute it to [the fact] he's so smooth and natural. I was his position coach his rookie year, and he was rookie of the year by the way, and he only played 12 games. I did every [college] game on him because we had just been hired there in Carolina and Houston already said they were going to take quarterback [url="http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?playerId=3529"]David Carr[/url], so we had to choose between Julius and [url="http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?playerId=3531"]Joey Harrington[/url].

"People always talked about him taking plays off and doing this, but he's just so smooth and natural that he does things so easy that people think he's being lazy. But Julius plays hard. That reputation has always followed him, and maybe will always follow him for his whole career. I don't know, I hope not, because he is a really good guy. He commands a lot of attention. What was really impressive for us [in Carolina] was his work ethic in practice. He busts his butt in practice and I don't think the kid ever got enough credit for that."

[url="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-03-08/sports/chi-chicago-bears-julius-peppers-mar08_1_mike-rucker-julius-peppers-john-fox"]http://articles.chic...eppers-john-fox[/url]

In Charlotte, N.C., they still talk about the back-to-back plays Julius Peppers made in a game in Denver in 2004.
On third-and-3, he pushed Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer out of bounds on a bootleg after a 2-yard gain. Then on fourth-and-1, he intercepted Plummer's pass and ran it back 97 yards.

That is how Peppers will be remembered by John Fox, the only NFL head coach Peppers has known.
"Pep's a heck of a player," Fox said Monday. "I knew he'd be a guy who would be one of the first to get signed. He hasn't had any injuries. He's clean as a whistle medically. I know he's 30, but he looks just like he did when he was 22."
[b]Fox dispelled the notion that the Bears' new defensive end takes a lot of plays off. He said effort was not a problem for Peppers.[/b]
[b]"He trains and works hard," Fox said. "He's a great kid. He's quiet, but he leads by example."[/b]

[b][url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ys-peppersbears011411"]http://sports.yahoo....persbears011411[/url][/b]


[url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/teams/chi/"]Chicago Bears[/url] coach Lovie Smith and defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli approached the offseason evaluation of defensive end [url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/5888/"]Julius Peppers[/url] with caution.
The second overall pick in the 2002 NFL draft, Peppers was a five-time Pro Bowl selection who had racked up 25 sacks in the previous two seasons, yet, during the 2010 offseason, he was an unrestricted free agent.

“We did a lot of homework on him,” Smith said, “and everything came back the same.”
Despite his immense NFL success – 81 sacks in his first eight seasons – Peppers was dogged by questions that he wasn’t consistent and that he didn’t fulfill his potential. So Smith wanted to be comfortable that Peppers was going to be a cornerstone defender and not a free-agent disaster.
Smith sought the input of numerous people he trusted, including his friend Ron Meeks, the [url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/teams/car/"]Carolina Panthers[/url]’ defensive coordinator in 2009 and 2010.
“ ‘One of the best guys you will have a chance to coach,’ ” Smith recalled one person telling him. “Everything was positive.”
Peppers was an exception, so the Bears made an exception.

[url="http://espn.go.com/blog/chicagobears/post/_/id/4665348/peppers-relishes-his-fresh-start"]http://espn.go.com/b...his-fresh-start[/url]

Now that he’s accomplished the change, Peppers wants to finally silence the critics. One NFL coach who worked with Peppers in Carolina, held the same beliefs about a perceived lack of effort from the defensive end.
“When we were evaluating before we got him, I thought that too. Then one of our coaches gave me tape from the [2002] combine,” the coach said. “He said watch this one first; then watch Julius. I watched the first guy, he’s straining through this drill, grunting, making all kinds of faces. Right after that, Peppers comes up and goes through the same drill [the coach imitates an effortless run]. Smooth. You look at your watch, and Peppers just smoked the time [of the player in the first drill]. He just makes it look so easy sometimes it looks like he’s not trying.”


Peppers laughed at the story, before agreeing and adding his spin.
[b]“You know, I think sometimes certain players – and I don’t name names – but certain players have a certain haircut, they have certain sack celebrations. They draw a lot of attention to themselves. That stuff can make it seem like you’re playing hard when really, you’re playing [about the same] as everybody else,” Peppers said. “You’re just bringing that extra attention to yourself. Just because I go about it mild mannered and I don’t do all of that stuff, maybe that’s something to talk about, too. If you hear [the criticism] from a coach that’s a different story. But I have yet to hear that from a coach. People who say it and watch the game don’t really understand my responsibilities on certain plays. If my play is not to run and chase the ball, if my play is to stay backside, then I’ve got to stay backside. I’ve got to be disciplined. I can’t run across the field and chase stuff that’s not mine. I can’t help that stuff comes easy sometimes; easier than somebody else. So I deal with it and hopefully, after this year, people won’t say that anymore.”[/b]
Still, critics will justifiably question whether the Bears paid too much for a player who could be entering the crossroads of his career. There’s also the legitimate concern that Peppers -- now that he’s received the big paycheck (he’ll make $40.5 million in the first three years) -- won't be motivated to play hard.
[b]“That’s not my moral fiber, my character,” Peppers said. “I’m not above criticism. I can [take that] constructive[ly]; not saying that I believe it’s true. But if that’s something I have a chance to prove people wrong about, then I welcome that criticism. There’s pressure to perform. Being rewarded by this organization in that way only makes me want to play harder and repay them for what they did for me.”[/b]
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yeah it stung a little bit when he left b/c he was my favorite player (being a tarheel helped his cause with me lol) but it's whatever now man. Happy with CJ/GH/FA.

Also - I think Julius Peppers is in a very rare club. He's one of the only athletes in history to start a Final Four game and a Super Bowl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

if 2007 didn't exist, then yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

[quote name='PredatorPeppers' timestamp='1365789558' post='2193090']

Thats a load of BS there bud. The media in Carolina made that crap up about Peppers and some of the stupid fans bought that crap up, I think that is a major reason Peppers left, because he didn't feel appreciated in Carolina.

[url="http://www.catscratchreader.com/2008/4/5/224349/7282"]http://www.catscratc...4/5/224349/7282[/url]

Seriously, we do know that Peppers had an undisclosed illness during training camp that caused him to miss some time. One rumor was that the medication he was taking made him lethargic and affected his aggressiveness. We still don’t know for sure what the illness was which I find a little strange.

[url="http://espn.go.com/blog/chicago/bears/post/_/id/4669770/trgovac-nothing-wrong-with-peppers-motor"]http://espn.go.com/b...h-peppers-motor[/url]

"He had it [the reputation] coming out of college," Trgovac said Tuesday at Super Bowl media day. "I always attribute it to [the fact] he's so smooth and natural. I was his position coach his rookie year, and he was rookie of the year by the way, and he only played 12 games. I did every [college] game on him because we had just been hired there in Carolina and Houston already said they were going to take quarterback [url="http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?playerId=3529"]David Carr[/url], so we had to choose between Julius and [url="http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?playerId=3531"]Joey Harrington[/url].

"People always talked about him taking plays off and doing this, but he's just so smooth and natural that he does things so easy that people think he's being lazy. But Julius plays hard. That reputation has always followed him, and maybe will always follow him for his whole career. I don't know, I hope not, because he is a really good guy. He commands a lot of attention. What was really impressive for us [in Carolina] was his work ethic in practice. He busts his butt in practice and I don't think the kid ever got enough credit for that."

[url="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-03-08/sports/chi-chicago-bears-julius-peppers-mar08_1_mike-rucker-julius-peppers-john-fox"]http://articles.chic...eppers-john-fox[/url]

In Charlotte, N.C., they still talk about the back-to-back plays Julius Peppers made in a game in Denver in 2004.
On third-and-3, he pushed Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer out of bounds on a bootleg after a 2-yard gain. Then on fourth-and-1, he intercepted Plummer's pass and ran it back 97 yards.

That is how Peppers will be remembered by John Fox, the only NFL head coach Peppers has known.
"Pep's a heck of a player," Fox said Monday. "I knew he'd be a guy who would be one of the first to get signed. He hasn't had any injuries. He's clean as a whistle medically. I know he's 30, but he looks just like he did when he was 22."
[b]Fox dispelled the notion that the Bears' new defensive end takes a lot of plays off. He said effort was not a problem for Peppers.[/b]
[b]"He trains and works hard," Fox said. "He's a great kid. He's quiet, but he leads by example."[/b]

[b][url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ys-peppersbears011411"]http://sports.yahoo....persbears011411[/url][/b]


[url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/teams/chi/"]Chicago Bears[/url] coach Lovie Smith and defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli approached the offseason evaluation of defensive end [url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/5888/"]Julius Peppers[/url] with caution.
The second overall pick in the 2002 NFL draft, Peppers was a five-time Pro Bowl selection who had racked up 25 sacks in the previous two seasons, yet, during the 2010 offseason, he was an unrestricted free agent.

“We did a lot of homework on him,” Smith said, “and everything came back the same.”
Despite his immense NFL success – 81 sacks in his first eight seasons – Peppers was dogged by questions that he wasn’t consistent and that he didn’t fulfill his potential. So Smith wanted to be comfortable that Peppers was going to be a cornerstone defender and not a free-agent disaster.
Smith sought the input of numerous people he trusted, including his friend Ron Meeks, the [url="http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/teams/car/"]Carolina Panthers[/url]’ defensive coordinator in 2009 and 2010.
“ ‘One of the best guys you will have a chance to coach,’ ” Smith recalled one person telling him. “Everything was positive.”
Peppers was an exception, so the Bears made an exception.

[url="http://espn.go.com/blog/chicagobears/post/_/id/4665348/peppers-relishes-his-fresh-start"]http://espn.go.com/b...his-fresh-start[/url]

Now that he’s accomplished the change, Peppers wants to finally silence the critics. One NFL coach who worked with Peppers in Carolina, held the same beliefs about a perceived lack of effort from the defensive end.
“When we were evaluating before we got him, I thought that too. Then one of our coaches gave me tape from the [2002] combine,” the coach said. “He said watch this one first; then watch Julius. I watched the first guy, he’s straining through this drill, grunting, making all kinds of faces. Right after that, Peppers comes up and goes through the same drill [the coach imitates an effortless run]. Smooth. You look at your watch, and Peppers just smoked the time [of the player in the first drill]. He just makes it look so easy sometimes it looks like he’s not trying.”


Peppers laughed at the story, before agreeing and adding his spin.
[b]“You know, I think sometimes certain players – and I don’t name names – but certain players have a certain haircut, they have certain sack celebrations. They draw a lot of attention to themselves. That stuff can make it seem like you’re playing hard when really, you’re playing [about the same] as everybody else,” Peppers said. “You’re just bringing that extra attention to yourself. Just because I go about it mild mannered and I don’t do all of that stuff, maybe that’s something to talk about, too. If you hear [the criticism] from a coach that’s a different story. But I have yet to hear that from a coach. People who say it and watch the game don’t really understand my responsibilities on certain plays. If my play is not to run and chase the ball, if my play is to stay backside, then I’ve got to stay backside. I’ve got to be disciplined. I can’t run across the field and chase stuff that’s not mine. I can’t help that stuff comes easy sometimes; easier than somebody else. So I deal with it and hopefully, after this year, people won’t say that anymore.”[/b]
Still, critics will justifiably question whether the Bears paid too much for a player who could be entering the crossroads of his career. There’s also the legitimate concern that Peppers -- now that he’s received the big paycheck (he’ll make $40.5 million in the first three years) -- won't be motivated to play hard.
[b]“That’s not my moral fiber, my character,” Peppers said. “I’m not above criticism. I can [take that] constructive[ly]; not saying that I believe it’s true. But if that’s something I have a chance to prove people wrong about, then I welcome that criticism. There’s pressure to perform. Being rewarded by this organization in that way only makes me want to play harder and repay them for what they did for me.”[/b]
[/quote]

Uh, I was listening to WFNZ the day Beason was in studio and remember him calling Peppers out. I distinctly remember it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.