Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

class valedictorian recites prayer during graduation ceremony, is summarily executed

104 posts in this topic

Posted

Meanwhile, in Alabama...

ATMORE, Ala. (AP) — An American Indian student says she's being fined $1,000 for wearing a feather on her mortarboard when she graduated from high school in south Alabama.

Chelsey Ramer says she feels like she's being discriminated against by her alma mater, Escambia Academy in Atmore.

Ramer is part of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, and the 17-year-old says she wore a feather at graduation last month to honor her heritage.

http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/article/20130606/NEWS/130606015/American-Indian-student-fined-wearing-feather-during-graduation-from-south-Alabama-high-school
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

our country is falling apart. the fabric and the constitution is old man. old.

 

 

i suggest more hobbies for some of ya's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

would you have clapped if you were in that audience?

 

only with one hand, so as to not betray the glorious golden mean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Dont let the media twist the important issues.  Remember, The school district banned a name because of a religious  connotation.  That is unconstitutional.  What ever the high schooler did simply shed light on the subject.  It would not have mattered whether or not he spoke the Quran, Torah, Bible, Tripitaka.  The school protested christianity by banning the name Jesus. They had no right, in fact they exercised horrible judgement and abuse of power.  Not supporting something and outright banning it are entirely different things.

 

And for the record, had they banned the name Mohammed and the student performed Azan, he would be equally within his rights and should get equal protection under the constitution.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

One of the high school's in my county all stood up tonight during the moment of silence at their graduation (prayer was ruled not to be allowed last week), and recited the Lord's Prayer in protest.  Current and former students are on Facebook congratulating themselves and acting proud.  

 

These same people will now cite the 2nd Amendement/Constitution as the reason they support gun rights, while ignoring the 1st Amendment totally when it comes to religion.  I just don't understand how some people can blatantly be so silly sometimes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

^^^^^^

 

I work with a guy named Jesus, I assume he would be permabannt from SC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

only with one hand, so as to not betray the glorious golden mean

Good insight Pee Wee Herman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

i like the hypotheticals i see being brought up where people would totes be cool with opening up meetings with a moozlem prayer because "they'd be perfectly within their rights".  i think the fact that something like that is extremely unlikely to happen at a graduation or school board meeting in the bible belt plays in to it.  

 

i remember this board when the "ground zero mosque" stuff was going on so pardon me for taking anybody's wide open advocacy of freedom of religion with a grain of salt.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

with all that is going on. i'd say there are significantly bigger fish to fry than to assume the out rage and blood lust if a muslim were to give a pro muslim speech etc.

 

way to have faith in your fellow man.

 

 

this is way down the list of events that are a threat to our everyday lives. but if some of you need a boogey man to keep you motivated to post on a message board, have at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

i like the hypotheticals i see being brought up where people would totes be cool with opening up meetings with a moozlem prayer because "they'd be perfectly within their rights".  i think the fact that something like that is extremely unlikely to happen at a graduation or school board meeting in the bible belt plays in to it.  

 

i remember this board when the "ground zero mosque" stuff was going on so pardon me for taking anybody's wide open advocacy of freedom of religion with a grain of salt.

 

Once again, civilian protest in whatever form is not the same as banning.  People dont have to like a religion.  The law allows people to protest.  It allows people to not support it.  It does not allow institutions to ban a religion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Once again, civilian protest in whatever form is not the same as banning.  People dont have to like a religion.  The law allows people to protest.  It allows people to not support it.  It does not allow institutions to ban a religion.

 

What religion was banned?

 

As far as I'm aware Americans are free to practice any religion they want no matter how laughably implausible it may be. 

 

Want to testify how Jesus and his sky god saved you from eternal hell?  Do it in church, a home, the public square, on the radio, TV, or internet.  You can do it practically any place you like other than where other people's children (who may not share your religious views) are a captured audience, namely a public school.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Once again, civilian protest in whatever form is not the same as banning.  People dont have to like a religion.  The law allows people to protest.  It allows people to not support it.  It does not allow institutions to ban a religion.

 

first of all, there is no "ban on religion" in schools.  what exists is a series of supreme court decisions (engle vs. vitale and abington school district v. schempp being the most significant) on the constitutionality of faculty and staff-led prayer in schools, during school related activities, and on school property.  couldn't i just as easily spin it that the school district erred on the side of constitutionality when they chose to discontinue their practice of opening their meetings with a prayer?  that would square nicely with several USC decisions.  no institution can "ban a religion" because that'd be baldly unconstitutional and that's not what happened.

 

second, that's not even what's going on here, though.  situations like this one where you have a student using a taxpayer-funded platform to flaunt their piety of their own volition are substantially less clear.  court cases have gone both ways and i've not observed a clear consensus on the issue.  

 

i brought up park51 because it's an interesting dichotomy.  in that situation you had christian conservatives calling for the government to step in and terminate a private property owner's rights because the idea of a "victory mosque" (not what it actually was of course) so close to the WTC site offended them.  the property owner was 100% within his constitutional rights but that didn't matter at all.  things like school-endorsed prayer at school sanctioned events are much more palatable in the bible belt though so it's no biggie.

 

this part irks me though:

 

 

 

 People dont have to like a religion.  The law allows people to protest.  It allows people to not support it.

 

i don't get it.  are you saying that the government can endorse a religion (repeatedly ruled unconstitutional in its various permutations) and even use taxpayer funded platforms to practice it but we're allowed to disagree and/or protest it so all's well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites