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The Mythical "Real Job".........DA DA DAAAAAAAA!

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Everything is a dream job until you are there for a year or two. Eventually you will grow to hate anything you decide to do.
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Everything is a dream job until you are there for a year or two. Eventually you will grow to hate anything you decide to do.

naw man I worked as a raft guide and jumped seasons for 3 years, only reason I stopped was because you don't make any money doing it, much less make enough to buy a house or start a family with so that's why I stopped but it was a freaking awesome job! Loved it.

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when they ask you what your weaknesses are say something real and how you've improved not some stupid shiat like "i care too much."

that's a character question... they've heard bullshiat answers before.


and jerk off before you go.


The one I use is that I don't trust other people to do my work or make sure something gets done, but I have improved it in some bs way
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naw man I worked as a raft guide and jumped seasons for 3 years, only reason I stopped was because you don't make any money doing it, much less make enough to buy a house or start a family with so that's why I stopped but it was a freaking awesome job! Loved it.


I guess should have specified. You can like a job, but won't make a living doing it unless you hate it!! Lol

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Posted · Report post

Totally not true.  At least, for myself.

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I think people start hating the people or the company or the policies, but not really the job always.  I've never hated a job that I've had, I just started hating the company and the politics of the workplace, etc.

 

Anyway, for interviewing, dress up appropriately but I would never overdress.  Luckily in the south, people don't always expect suits (depending on which field).  I'm in IT and I have maybe wore a tie once to an interview.  I wear nice shoes (nothing flashy), ironed and nice slacks, and a nice ironed button up shirt.  Ironing is key.  If you can't take 10 minutes to iron your clothes, do you think a company wants you?  I usually go with a solid blue button up shirt.  I would also go clean shaven if you can.  I usually rock out a goatee at all times but I understand that not everyone is OK with facial hair, but everyone is usually OK with clean shaven.  Once you get the job, you can gauge what is OK and what isn't.  

 

Be confident but don't act like the job is yours for the taking.  Show some humility.  They already know your qualifications, now it is time to sell yourself.  And if you don't know this yet, getting a job hangs on qualifications less than you think.    Project yourself as someone that anyone could work with, even if you really aren't, put on your happy face/attitude (but not too much).   I always research the company AND the person interviewing me (if possible).  Lurk their LinkedIn and Facebook if applicable, so you know their interests, religious affiliation, political affiliation. etc, so you have a better idea of what to say and what NOT to say.   Remember, you're selling yourself, so if you can have a non-business conversation about a shared interest (or even BSing like you are into that) that may be the thing that sets you apart from the competition, as in being fresh in the interviewer's mind after talking to 30 or more people.   I've had interviewers bring up political things, either in little comments or whatnot, and I just roll with it, I don't take a stance either way, but make it sound like I care or at least could "possibly" have the same believes.  

 

I think it's ok to mention you are married, but I wouldn't mention kids.  Being married shows you are more grounded (not always but yeah) but kids could mean you aren't dependable and could miss time for sick kids, etc (not always the case either, but you know).  

 

Go in with some questions about the company (after you have researched it), even if you really aren't that interested in it.  It'll show you put some time into the interview and could set you apart.  I usually bring a notebook/notepad with questions and also to write notes down (I usually don't, but it looks good).  You could also bring a couple copies of your resume in case you need to hand some out (bosses aren't always organized, and showing you are, may set you apart).  You at least should have ONE copy of your resume, in case the interviewer asks you something on there and you can't completely remember, so this way you can glance at it.

 

Show enthusiasm, even if it's mostly fake.   It's ok to express the fact that you're very excited about the opportunity, or mention what it could mean for you, you aren't negotiating salary just yet (usually).  Be prepared for the stock questions.  Your biggest strength and weakness question, where do you see yourself in 5 years, past stressful scenarios, etc.  When I interview for IT jobs, a good deal of what they want me to do, I haven't really dealt with it yet, I don't lie, I tell them I haven't had a chance to interact with that software/tech, but I'm excited at the possibility, and I stress that I'm a fast learner and can pickup things on the fly, and provide examples from past jobs.  I'll also write down that software/tech in notes and mention that I'll try to brush up on the information, just to show how motivated I am to land the job that I'll research before even getting an offer (even if you really don't look it up).  

 

Yeah that's TL:DR but I've always regarded myself as an excellent interviewee and I have landed some jobs that I really shouldn't have by just selling myself into it.   

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Well good for you. 

 

Not so much for myself. I went from making 700$ a week to 300$ a week. I got fired because I arrived at work 2 minutes late. 

 

#ImLivingTheBumLife

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great post Z and very helpful and bang on in my opnion.

 

I never really ever considered bring notes or a notebook in...not sure if I've ever seen that either. 

 

Anyone else that has interviewed or been interviewed recently done or seen this?

 

I ask because I have a whole bunch of talking points and notes for myself for tomorrow more so because I know I'll be nervous and bouncing all over the place so I thought making some notes and some specific topics or examples I would like to use before hand would be useful.  I never considered bringing them in with me though!  Nice one

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Oh yeah, bringing a notebook IMO shows you put some thought into the job instead of just showing up and winging it.  I just think it's one of those little things that could set you apart from the rest.  The fact you researched the company and wrote down actual questions shows some motivation and bringing in the actual notebook is sort of "proof" that you didn't think of the questions on the fly.   I don't think any realistic employer expects you to memorize everything you want to ask and everything they tell you.  And we all we go blank sometimes when asked "do you have any questions?".   I personally hate that awkward feeling when they ask for that and you don't have any, but looking at your notebook with a few questions remedies that.  

 

 

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good point...this is an internal position I am interviewing for...so company research questions shouldn't be an issue!!!  that said, some role specific questions are a great idea.  Thanks

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great post Z and very helpful and bang on in my opnion.

 

I never really ever considered bring notes or a notebook in...not sure if I've ever seen that either. 

 

Anyone else that has interviewed or been interviewed recently done or seen this?

 

I ask because I have a whole bunch of talking points and notes for myself for tomorrow more so because I know I'll be nervous and bouncing all over the place so I thought making some notes and some specific topics or examples I would like to use before hand would be useful.  I never considered bringing them in with me though!  Nice one

 

I've never interviewed without a notebook, or now a tablet.

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do you use it as a cheat sheet or just for questions you want to ask?  For example...if I wrote down a bunch of bullets on things I will want to talk about or use as examples for some of the questions I anticipate them asking...is that a good thing or bad?

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