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The Huddler

Drinking Age Presentation

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Anyone else notice Squirrel's attempts at the word supposedly. :thumbsu:  

 

 

That wasnt really a attempt.

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If it's not so obvious...

I would examine statistics on binge drinking, alcoholism, and drunk driving accidents/incidence rates in Western countries that have lower drinking ages. For instance, beer and wine are available to those 16 and older here in the Netherlands, and I believe it's the same in Belgium. Hard liquor is 18 and older. Then compare those numbers to those in the United States.

Id also say that public transit and infrastructure there is leaps and bounds ahead of the us. That s like comparing NYCs duis per capita

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As far as BAC.  This one is actually a little easier.  BAC isnt about tolerence it is percentage of alcohol in the blood.  A bigger person can drink more alcohol and registry the same as a smaller person who drank less.   While tolerence would be a better indicator of how drunk some. I know I out  drank alot of people twice might size and wasnt drunk as them. 

 

You may have appeared to be less drunk than the larger person was.  However, studies and statistics have shown that your reaction times are more impared (even if you don't outwardly show it by staggering. sluring, etc).

 

The studies have shwon that there is a direct correlation to your actual impairment and the % of alcohol blood content....regardless of how you show it.

 

Not arguing for or against a .05 threshold....just stating statistics and facts.

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90oo78.jpg

 

For the average person, the "relative risk" barely changes until you hit .12. This means the average person is no more dangerous on the road until he goes above .12.

 

The exception as you can see in the graph above is 16-20 year old male which starts rising materially at .04. Basically the rest of the population is being punished.

 

This is an example of a law addressing the lowest common denominator.

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To legally prepare you for the college experience.

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90oo78.jpg

 

For the average person, the "relative risk" barely changes until you hit .12. This means the average person is no more dangerous on the road until he goes above .12.

 

The exception as you can see in the graph above is 16-20 year old male which starts rising materially at .04. Basically the rest of the population is being punished.

 

This is an example of a law addressing the lowest common denominator.

 

Good info.

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Id also say that public transit and infrastructure there is leaps and bounds ahead of the us. That s like comparing NYCs duis per capita

 

Point taken. However, aside from drunk driving issues, there's still issues of binge drinking hospitalization or youth alcoholism that could be found in WHO stats that would be a valid comparison.

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   I always wondered there's a maturity level that goes with the alcohol buzz itself and not so much the age. The first couple of years a person drinks, its all new to them, they over do it and its pretty chaotic.  After a few years, most people get used to the buzz, know whats good and bad about it, and control it better than what they did from the start.  Basically, they become a little more wiser with the alcohol experience. If you wise up earlier in life with drinking, you may make better decisions with when how much to drink.  If thats true, then maybe things will be better lowering the age to 16, and raising the age to 18 to be able to drive a car....

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I won't argue dropping the drinking age to 18 across the board.  It's still 18 where I live and I buy into the arguments of all the other things you can do as soon as you hit 18, drinking legally should be one of them.

 

As for the impaired driving, the legal limit doesn't matter to me too much, I'd just like to see much harsher penalties.  Whether you agree or not, that's your right, but there's still way too many people killed every year because of drunk driving.

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Point taken. However, aside from drunk driving issues, there's still issues of binge drinking hospitalization or youth alcoholism that could be found in WHO stats that would be a valid comparison.

 

I wasn't arguing with your point though. I look at Europe and their approach to eating, drinking, sex, and overall quality of life and still think there's tons of room for improvement here in the US.

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