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#76 bleys

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 08:55 AM

Crispy Coconut Chicken Finger Nuggets with Tangy Balsamic Dip (Gluten and Grain Free)

 

 
Chicken Strips
1 pound chicken breasts, cut into strips
3 pastured eggs
1/4 cup coconut milk
3/4 cup coconut flour
3/4 cup shredded coconut (optional, I didn't use)
1/4 tsp. garlic powder
1/4 tsp. onion powder
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1/4 tsp. fresh ground black pepper
- coconut oil for frying Ingredients –
 
Tangy Balsamic Dip - mix until smooth
2 tbsp. Dijon mustard 
1.5 balsamic vinaigrette 
 
 
Simply add beaten eggs to one bowl and flour mixed with garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper into another bowl.  Once chicken is cut into strips dip into flour mixture then eggs and then flour mixture once again.  Shake off excess flour and set onto a tray.  Repeat.
 
Fry 'em up.  And enjoy the tangy balsamic dip.  (which is the main reason I posted this)


#77 StepandFetch

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 03:12 AM

Traditional NC Barbecue

 

This recipe uses no crock-pots, microwaves, charcoal, gas, electricity, or bbq sauce.

 

THE PIT:

 

The pit can be constructed on the cheap from a myriad of sources. Mine is built from 8"-16" cinder blocks. I first raked the ground and used sand to build a flat spot for the pit. On top of the "foundation" are the cinder blocks. They can be assembled to make a pit as large or as small as you desire. Mine is fairly small, because I normally smoke no more than one pork shoulder at a time. Just remember to assemble a pit so that coals can be shoveled under the meat. Regardless of shape or size, the meat should be about 15-25 inches above the coals. After much experimentation, this distance seems to be about perfect. Next you will need a sheet of expanded metal that fits the shape of your pit. Above the grate, you will need another level of blocks, so that the sheet metal or plywood cover will not touch the bbq. Before you smoke your first bbq, I would recommend filling the blocks with sand, to help insulate the heat.

 

**** Take care to make sure the pit is DRY before smoking bbq. wet blocks can crack when heated suddenly. You might consider investing in a tarp.

 

In addition to the cooking pit, you will also need an area to build the fire that creates the coals for heating the pit. I arranged cinder blocks like this: |__|  I stack the fire up against the blocks, so that when I shovel coals,  I can shovel them against a wall. (So I don't have to chase after coals like a fork chases after peas on a dinner plate.)

 

THE MEAT:

 

Some prefer whole hogs. I prefer shoulders and picnics. Whole hogs are expensive and more difficult than shoulders. The good meat to waste ratio also highly favors the shoulder.

 

To find a shoulder, you should be going to butcher shops, not grocery stores. Much better prices, much more knowledgeable staff, much better meat quality. Make sure the shoulder was not "enhanced" with sodium.

 

The best shoulder is one with fat cap intact. More fat/connective tissue= better taste, more moist and tender bbq.

 

I use no rubs, sauces, or bastes. The fat within supplies more than enough of all these things.

 

THE WOOD:

 

The best bbq woods are fruit and nut woods. The most traditional to NC are Oak and Hickory. My favorite is Hickory. All varieties work well- shellbark, shagbark, pignut, mockernut, etc.

 

I prefer hickory over oak because it leaves a much more intense smoke flavor and aroma when it burns. The smell of hickory smoke is unparalleled- it is savory, sweet, and wonderful. TRUST ME!!

 

The smoking wood should probably be seasoned for at least 5-6 months, though I have heard some have found good results with burning green wood. After the wood seasons past one year, it begins to lose potency.

 

THE PROCESS:

 

If you want barbecue for lunch on Sunday, then you need to start your fire at around 3:00AM that morning. This is why most use a crock pot over an outdoor pit.

 

At that inhumane hour of 3:00 AM, light your fire in the burn-down pit.  Spray the expanded metal grate with PAM so that the shoulder does not stick when you try to remove it. Once you have a roaring fire, start shoveling coals. Choose a shovel with a flat edge. To pre-heat the pit, shovel the coals along the inside walls of the pit before shoveling into the middle. Once the pit is heated to a consistent temperature of around 200 degrees, it is time to start cooking. Remove the shoulder from the fridge, and coat the exterior with coarse salt. (I use coarse kosher salt to be ironic.) Apply the salt like you would apply a rub. Lay the pork on the grate so that the fat cap is facing upwards. The idea here is to lay an even bed of coals so you won't have uneven cooking.

 

The fat cap should be up so that when it melts away, it bastes the meat below it. Doing this will make incredibly moist cue.

 

Once you lay the pork in the pit, the process becomes somewhat repetitive. As the temperature inside the pit cools down, you will need to add a shovelfull of coals. You start at 200-230. After about 30 minutes, the temps will fall down to about 180. At this time, add more coals to keep the temps at the designated target level. I try to keep my temps close to 215 degrees. This cycle of adding coals and waiting will be repeated several dozen times before the pork is done.

 

Here is a little trick I learned: while you are cooking the cue, you should take your axe or hatchet and chop kindling-sized sticks from hickory logs. Every hour or so, throw in a new stick. Wou want it to smoulder, not burn. If they catch fire, hit em with the shovel. These sticks will create an unbelievable amount of smoke. Smoke = flavor. The best smoke is of the thin and blue-gray variety, rather than the thick, white, and billowy type. 

 

Another trick: Soak whole garlic bulbs in a bowl of water. Every few hours, throw a whole bulb into the coals. I don't know if the garlic enhances the flavor, but the smell of smouldering garlic cloves is magnificent.

 

One last trick I learned from Lexington BBQ Center: Use a rectangular piece of cardboard, bent in half, to keep the swirling ashes away from the pork. It works like a tent over the pork.

 

 

The pork shouder does not cook uniformly. You should cook the pork by internal temperature- not time. The perfect internal temperature is about 200 degrees. A better way to gauge doneness is by stabbing the shoulder with a bamboo skewer or a grill fork. A finished shoulder should feel like sticking the skewer in butter- meaning- there should be little resistance. For your first few attempts, I would smoke under the rule of numerous oven and meat thermometers, just to prevent novice mistakes. When you test for doneness, test several times, in several different places. The shoulder is not like a chicken breast- there are many different areas of the shoulder that all cook a bit differently.

 

When the shoulder is finished, wrap it in several layers of aluminum foil, then one towel, and lay inside an ice cooler. Let it rest for about 30 minutes.

 

After unwrapping, remove the fat cap, and start shredding or chopping. I prefer a coarse chop. The best part is the outside brown. If you added a rub of spices and sugars to the outside of the shoulder, the outside turns into a thick, black, and very bitter crust. If you only add a bit of salt, the outside becomes marbled in deep hues of red and brown. Underneath this outside brown is a layer of pinkish meat. This is called the smoke ring, and it can only be made with hardwood coals, time, patience, and an obedience to tradition.

 

While this process is a bit arduous, it is not at all expensive. I spent less than $50 on my pit. That is a hell of a lot less than a Big Green Egg smoker. The pork shoulder is a very cheap cut of meat. I prefer a shoulder between 7-12 pounds. A cut that size will cost you less than $20 for what will end up being enough meat to feed as many as 10-15 people.

 

Enjoy!

 

I will add some pictures of my own pit and bbq eventually.

 

 

 

 



#78 StepandFetch

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 09:29 PM

Here are some pictures of my bbq setup, taken from the summer before last. If I remember correctly, it was 105 that day. This humble and affordable pit has smoked some great bbq over the years.

Attached Files

  • Attached File  bbq.jpg   45.61KB   6 downloads
  • Attached File  bbq2.jpg   33.86KB   6 downloads
  • Attached File  bbq4.jpg   47.16KB   5 downloads
  • Attached File  bbq3.jpg   33.81KB   5 downloads


#79 MichaelNewtonII

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:42 PM

I eat Fried Gristle, and Bacon wit eggs. And toast

Sent from my SGH-T399 using CarolinaHuddle mobile app



#80 dos poptarts

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 10:59 AM

Gonna add this in.....

Oven Roasted Brussel Sprouts. I have seen the light and glory.

Fresh sprouts off the stalk (preferred) or loose.

Preheat oven to 420.

Wash

Trim the base. Outer leaves will fall off. Don't throw these away.

Toss with olive oil, coarse salt, cracked pepper. toss w/ the loose leafs on as well.

Place sprouts on cookie sheet (I line mine with foid and make little walls on the edges).

Roast for approx 30-35 mins. Shaking the sheet so they will roll over ~every 7 mins.

The loose leaves will cook to a dark crisp, but not til burning.

 

I always thought sprouts were OK, but roasting them is what they were made for.....Wife hated sprouts before and she loves them roasted. The loose leaves are like little potato chips.

 

My sister adds in diced pancetta(?) or bacon to hers.

 

 

 



#81 MCCNASTY

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:04 PM

Gonna add this in.....

Oven Roasted Brussel Sprouts. I have seen the light and glory.

Fresh sprouts off the stalk (preferred) or loose.

Preheat oven to 420.

Wash

Trim the base. Outer leaves will fall off. Don't throw these away.

Toss with olive oil, coarse salt, cracked pepper. toss w/ the loose leafs on as well.

Place sprouts on cookie sheet (I line mine with foid and make little walls on the edges).

Roast for approx 30-35 mins. Shaking the sheet so they will roll over ~every 7 mins.

The loose leaves will cook to a dark crisp, but not til burning.

 

I always thought sprouts were OK, but roasting them is what they were made for.....Wife hated sprouts before and she loves them roasted. The loose leaves are like little potato chips.

 

My sister adds in diced pancetta(?) or bacon to hers.

 

Add pecans or walnuts.  You will thank me.