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Take this middle class


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#1 ARSEN

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 09:43 AM

http://www.wsoctv.co...ss-funds/nYYMz/

 

While...

 

http://finance.yahoo...-150015885.html

 



#2 dos poptarts

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 10:17 AM

G5 already posted the first topic in a different thread. Still feel the same. I have no idea if that will improve or worsen NC, BUT if it fails, another reason to vote the BUMs out. Very simple. This is why we are supposed to be a republic. States can fug up and politicians replaced. Now both sides seem go overboard once they get total control. Nature of the beast I guess.

 

On the farm bill, haven't read the specifics, but I thought neither side was really happy with it.

 

 



#3 NanuqoftheNorth

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:10 PM

Many of those at the top of the corporate food chain are no longer moved by the concepts of "shared sacrifice" and loyalty to the USA.  Today CEOs are more concerned with enriching themselves at the expense of their ever shrinking American work force.  These CEOs are transferring much of the cost of employing those remaining American workers onto the backs of federal and state taxpayers. 

 

These corporations are paying many workers sub poverty level wages and the taxpayer picks up the difference by providing these low wage workers with food stamps and earned income tax credits.  It is simply another way for CEOs to externalize the cost of doing business and fattening their own paychecks in the process.

 

  

 

“When CEOs switched from asking the question of ‘how much is enough’ to ‘how much can I get,’ investor capital and executive talent started scrapping like hyenas for every morsel,” said Roger Martin, dean of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, in an interview. “It’s not that either hates labor, or wants to crush their lives. They just don’t care.”

 

 

It doesn't take a genius to reduce wages, fire workers and move production and services overseas, all of which erodes our nation's ability to maintain a viable middle class/consumer based economy.  Many who currently feel this issue is only applies to non-skilled and semi-skilled laborers are in for a rude awaking as this trend continues to grow with CEOs looking for more avenues to reduce labor costs.

 

CEO Pay 1,795-to-1 Multiple of Wages Skirts U.S. Law

 

Across the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index of companies, the average multiple of CEO compensation to that of rank-and-file workers is 204, up 20 percent since 2009, the data show. The numbers are based on industry-specific estimates for worker compensation.

 

Almost three years after Congress ordered public companies to reveal actual CEO-to-worker pay ratios under the Dodd-Frank law, the numbers remain unknown. As the Occupy Wall Street movement and 2012 election made income inequality a social flashpoint, mandatory disclosure of the ratios remained bottled up at the Securities and Exchange Commission, which hasn’t yet drawn up the rules to implement it. Some of America’s biggest companies are lobbying against the requirement.

 

“It’s a simple piece of information shareholders ought to have,” said Phil Angelides, who led the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, which investigated the economic collapse of 2008. “The fact that corporate executives wouldn’t want to display the number speaks volumes.” The lobbying is part of “a street-by-street, block-by-block fight waged by large corporations and their Wall Street colleagues” to obstruct the Dodd-Frank law, he said.

 

http://www.bloomberg...sec-delays.html

 

“Companies that can justify the amount that they are paying their CEOs and employees shouldn’t be fearful of the ratio,” Aguilar, a Democrat, said in an interview.

 

Chart: How 1,000+ Workers Can Equal Just One CEO. Bloomberg's Data on Compensation for 250 Chief Executives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



#4 pstall

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:18 PM

CEO pay has been snowballing for years and it's hard to say lets cap it at X. Then why not cap it more? At the same time, maybe capping isn't the right incentive as much as say if a CEO has reached a threshold of 200 x of the lowest worker in that company, there needs to be some type of profit sharing plan going on.

 

if more people have money to spend, it can only do the overall economy good.



#5 Delhommey

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:26 PM

Socialism is the only way to save capitalism. 



#6 dos poptarts

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:42 PM

Hmm, I've got to find the CEO chart that shows pay vs # of employees. I think the JC Penny dude that was fired was the worst offender and not a single other CEO was even close. Damn, searching but can't find the specific chart that showed the CEO breakdown. It's not just the CEOs but the BoDs that enable them.

 

In my last yearly company survey I made it a point to hammer exec leadership and requested that 1/2 the board of directors be fired. That they were all responsible for the mistakes of the previous 2 CEOs and approved the direction and decisions made by those CEOs. Doubt that my little optional comments were the driving factor, but two of those fuggers were out the door this year. Replaced, but I'll keep this comment alive until proven otherwise :new boss same as the old boss.



#7 pstall

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:50 PM

Socialism is the only way to save capitalism. 

 

it's a delicate ying and yang tango. capitalism can fund the ability for socialism to work but not the other way around.

 

and yes as much as i love the market i know and understand the need for smart, practical safety nets.



#8 PhillyB

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 04:19 PM

you all just want to punish successful people for being successful



#9 teeray

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 04:52 PM

NC is quickly becoming a clusterfug.

#10 pstall

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 04:57 PM

lets look at unemployment and hiring in the next 90 days. then i think we will have an idea which way the momentum is going.



#11 teeray

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 05:58 PM

AF this rate pretty soon NC will be the new SC. *shutters*

#12 teeray

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:00 PM

lets look at unemployment and hiring in the next 90 days. then i think we will have an idea which way the momentum is going.


It usually takes several years before you know what if any effect a policy has on those type of things.

#13 pstall

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:24 PM

right, but im talking momentum. that can tell me alot about 6 months to a year from now what to expect. the full fledge impact of a policy change, sure, can take years to be clear of the impact.




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