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CharlottePanther

My camp thoughts after today. Expect a conservative, run offense.

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It'd be a real shame if we tossed away a promising season to do that, OP.

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If this offense looks like Foxball....Gettlemen, Rivera and Shula should all be fired.

We have Cam. You don't play Foxball with that type weapon.

We have a spotty OL, an old RB , an injury plagued RB, a rookie RB, and a FB. Even if your QB sucks you would need a great D front to back to attempt to be a legit contender playing Foxball with that. Our best player this year in the secondary could easily be the Raider reject....bc he walked into such a weak cast.

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I disagree, go back and look at the last half of the season when we went on a run. A majority of those games we dominated time of possession in a big way and we just so happened to win those games. You will never get anywhere play Chud ball, passing it 30 yds at a time hoping to score to right away. With a good D, you can win championships playing ball control

The offense has been statistically the best it ever was in the last two seasons, the problem has been engineering late game drives.

Every consistently good team is going away from ball control or already has. The only teams that still do it only do so because they have no QBs that can throw.

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You do realize that practices focus on certain elements of the game, I'm more curious as to what they do in the 2nd and 3rd preseason games, then what happens in anything else before the season starts.

Our #1 goal this preseason is to make it out injury free

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I'm okay with a conservative, run first offense. I'm not okay with Foxball where we go up 7-0, 14-3, or whatever then try to sit on a lead with run left, run right, run middle then punt philosophy. Drove me nuts.

Keep putting points on the board.

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So I did a little digging on time of possession. In 2012, the top half of the league (teams that were at or above 30:00 in average TOP) looked like this:

4VjPMFI.png

 

On this list you'll find 9 of last years' 12 playoff teams. The only teams that didn't win the average TOP battle were the Minnesota Vikings (28:24 which actually placed them as 28th in the league), Cincinnati Bengals (29:23, placing them just outside the top half at 17) and coincidentally the defending SuperBowl Champion Baltimore Ravens came in at a lowly 27:49, good for 30th in the NFL last year.

 

So while there's no guarantee that winning the TOP battle will get you into the playoffs--the Pittsburgh Steelers were second in the league, for example--you're more likely to get into January if your team is holding onto the ball.

 

How this directly relates to the topic of this thread and the Panthers' possibly more conservative offense, I'll let you all continue to debate but there's just a keyhole's worth of context when it comes to time of possession.

 

Edit: source for the above table is http://www.teamrankings.com/nfl/stat/average-time-of-possession-net-of-ot

 

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would rather score by 3 than 7...  brilliant.

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There is nothing to take away from what you witnessed in the preseason so far other than the Panthers are focused on practicing a more traditional run game during these sessions.

 

I know the Panthers want to make power running more of a staple & base of the offense instead of the read-option (per Shula himself), but that doesn't necessarily equate to conservative.

 

The Panthers have been one of the least conservative teams on offense the last couple of years.  While I think Shula (given his background & statements) wants to be more conservative than Chud, I hope and think he will still retain some of the higher-risk plays given the weapons we have in Smitty, Ginn, Jr. & Cam himself. 

 

The Panthers have been near the very top of the league the last 2 years in explosive (20 yards+) plays.  There is no reason to completely abandon that.  At the same time, the Panthers have come out, especially in the 2nd Halves, throwing caution to the wind & having a lot of 3-and-outs where a more conservative approach would have been better IMO.

 

I have been to training camp many times, and everything open to the public is open to the rest of the NFL.  It does give you a good idea of the overall talent level of individuals and groups (and who has the potential to contribute, etc., but very little can be gathered about the scheme.  That is by design.

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Can't win with a whole bunch of fieldgoals in this league anymore.

If the foxball u speak of consist of getting a lead and then totally taking the air out the ball, then count me out.

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So I did a little digging on time of possession. In 2012, the top half of the league (teams that were at or above 30:00 in average TOP) looked like this:

4VjPMFI.png

On this list you'll find 9 of last years' 12 playoff teams. The only teams that didn't win the average TOP battle were the Minnesota Vikings (28:24 which actually placed them as 28th in the league), Cincinnati Bengals (29:23, placing them just outside the top half at 17) and coincidentally the defending SuperBowl Champion Baltimore Ravens came in at a lowly 27:49, good for 30th in the NFL last year.

So while there's no guarantee that winning the TOP battle will get you into the playoffs--the Pittsburgh Steelers were second in the league, for example--you're more likely to get into January if your team is holding onto the ball.

How this directly relates to the topic of this thread and the Panthers' possibly more conservative offense, I'll let you all continue to debate but there's just a keyhole's worth of context when it comes to time of possession.

Edit: source for the above table is http://www.teamrankings.com/nfl/stat/average-time-of-possession-net-of-ot

Looking like there are a lot of passing teams on there

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