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Religious People Are Less Intelligent Than Atheists, Concludes New Study


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#31 pstall

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:22 PM

Donald Trump makes a lot of money so....



#32 Big A

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:25 PM

Use the brain that God gave you! Just not too much


How about using the brain that developed over millions of years through natural selection and when diets increased protein intake started developing higher reasoning abilities that allows some people to choose to believe a bunch of old morality fairy tales are actually true.

#33 Jase

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:26 PM

I think superstition shows a lack of intelligence. And while there are a lot of superstitions attached to religious beliefs I think one can be religious and not be very superstitious.

 

I view superstition as a complete disregard of occam's razor.  It's merely a different way of looking at the world and can sometimes lead a person to new answers.  The trouble with ignoring the most simple answers is that it opens you up to a lot of wrong answers, though.

 

 

At this point I'm just rambling what pops into my head.
 



#34 Darth Biscuit

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:26 PM

A quick search will reveal I listed just listed an office building at $1.49 M and Vacanf land zoned BC-1 for $875k just this morning, not exactly boarded up shacks and over $100k in commission when sold. FAIL!

 

A quick search will also reveal that you're full of poo.



#35 g5jamz

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:31 PM

wonders where agnostics fit into the study...but I really don't care enough to read it



#36 pstall

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:36 PM

i don't, ahem, believe this study.



#37 PhillyB

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:43 PM

wonders where agnostics fit into the study...but I really don't care enough to read it

 

Exhibit A



#38 Cat

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:47 PM

I view superstition as a complete disregard of occam's razor.  It's merely a different way of looking at the world and can sometimes lead a person to new answers.  The trouble with ignoring the most simple answers is that it opens you up to a lot of wrong answers, though.

 

 

At this point I'm just rambling what pops into my head.
 

 

Yes that but often the superstition is proven wrong yet still held.

 

ie: If I do A then B will happen. More often then not B doesn't happen yet the belief that B will happen is continued. That's shows the inability to learn.



#39 Jase

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:50 PM

No matter what you say, I'm still going to wear my black panthers t-shirt on sundays during the season.  60% of the time, our 3rd down efficiency improves every time.

 

What you're describing sounds more like stubbornness, ie choosing to reject what you learn in favor of, dare I say, confirmation bias?



#40 Niner National

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:58 PM

Exhibit A

I think he was making a joke. I'm not sure though because it wasn't funny.



#41 PhillyB

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:01 PM

No matter what you say, I'm still going to wear my black panthers t-shirt on sundays during the season.  60% of the time, our 3rd down efficiency improves every time.

 

What you're describing sounds more like stubbornness, ie choosing to reject what you learn in favor of, dare I say, confirmation bias?

 

religious paradigms are almost always foisted on unwilling offspring through the process of socialization, and it's usually the systems wherein fundamentalist monotheistic ideologies are being passed on that this phenomenon is most readily observable. taught from a young age that X is indisputably, undeniably true, and that X's source is infallible and written by God with the power to save and damn, any young child's mind will close off to new sources of data, rejecting them in favor of a predetermined belief system, filtering them through what is already determined to be true.

 

the only intellectually honest way to derive a belief system is by making a calculated decision once all available data has been observed, but that of course is antithetical to most religious systems. thus, ignorance, confirmation biases, and the hereditary nature of wacky-ass things people believe.



#42 Jase

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:06 PM

You can't blame everything on childhood conditioning. 

 

Any lingering effect of this is usually wiped out by the time a child reaches adolescence, the time that children figure out that mom and dad and the local minister don't truly know everything.



#43 Big A

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:12 PM

You can't blame everything on childhood conditioning.

Any lingering effect of this is usually wiped out by the time a child reaches adolescence, the time that children figure out that mompP and dad and the local minister don't truly know everything.


Exactly, forming your own original beliefs regardless of what has been taught and shown to you as a child is basically part of the experience of transitioning into adulthood and commonly takes place around college years .
My parents were very religious and I went to catholic schools all my life, yet I am a complete atheist.

#44 Cat

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:13 PM

No matter what you say, I'm still going to wear my black panthers t-shirt on sundays during the season.  60% of the time, our 3rd down efficiency improves every time.

 

What you're describing sounds more like stubbornness, ie choosing to reject what you learn in favor of, dare I say, confirmation bias?

 

haha

 

I was going to use an example from religion but i didn't want my point to get derailed, so i was then going to go with jersey color and realized the same thing would happen :)



#45 natty

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:33 PM

You can't blame everything on childhood conditioning. 

 

Any lingering effect of this is usually wiped out by the time a child reaches adolescence, the time that children figure out that mom and dad and the local minister don't truly know everything.

 

A lot of people don't go beyond that conditioning though.  Yeah everyone realizes in adolescence that their parents don't know everything but they don't always go back and question everything all over again.  




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