Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The real reason why black americans struggle disproportionately to their numbers


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,147 posts

Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:11 PM

Firstly, I'm not going to give a direct answer or reason.  I just want to talk about some things that I've thought about over my life.  Stuff that I heard my relatives talk about. 

 

 

I just got through watching a youtube video titled "The (Mis)Education of Black Boys", and it really caused me to think about some things.  Here's the video (and if you don't have time to watch the whole thing, the part that really piked my interests was around 58mins-1hr5min)....

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the area of 58-1:05, he talks about black culture.  No, not hip hop or chicken.  Real cultural stuff such as eye contact or looking away being a sign of respect or disrespect.  It was that part in his speech that really resonated with me.  I was definitely taught when I go out there in the world, be it school or going into a place of business, to look people in the eye when I spoke with them or a person speaks with me.  Yet from where I grew up (a standard middle class black family), momentary contact and looking away were natural things.  Personally, I do a little bit of both, but when I'm talking to a person who I know really well, I probably look away more so than looking at them or in their eyes.  In terms of black culture, I agree with the vid in that it is a sign of disrespect to look in a person's eyes.  It's the same with most asian cultures I believe.  Having eye contact with a person probably comes from the european cultures.

 

 

 

So that part I mentioned highlights this, and this is why a lot of black kids find themselves in the office, because there is a cultural misunderstanding.  So how does that play in the disproportionate struggles of black americans?  Well, a lot of the struggle begins young.  If they drop out of school and so on, most likely the children will struggle when they become adults.  I'll continue my thoughts after I see some responses to what I wrote.

 



#2 cookinwithgas

cookinwithgas

    Grey Poupon Elitest Trash

  • ALL-PRO
  • 23,774 posts

Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:22 PM

cut out that crappy liberal touchy feely stuff, black people are pathetic because Democrats program them that way to get votes



#3 NanuqoftheNorth

NanuqoftheNorth

    Frosty Alaskan Amber

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,935 posts
  • LocationAlaska

Posted 19 August 2013 - 11:19 PM

Spending a few hours openly discussing our cultural differences that were brought up in this video might help address many misunderstandings before they had a chance to derail the teaching/learning process.

 

I found this video very interesting.  Thanks for posting it Matthias.



#4 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,147 posts

Posted 21 August 2013 - 07:27 AM

To continue from yesterday, if we go back 60-70 years or so, even though most black americans didn't have great education, family was very important.  With it, having a hard work ethic.  These were two things at the forefront of black culture.  Now, there were stereotypes back then, mostly coming from the outright racism that was shown.  However, those stereotypes didn't hold a lot of water back then.  The majority south knew full well the work ethic of black men and women, which is why they were hired to do farm work and so on.  Both my dad and mom talked about there experiences of going to school and afterward working in the field.

 

 

Today is different.  Even if your educated and know stereotypes are generalizations, if someone asked you to name aspects of african american culture, hard work wouldn't be one of them. (If you ask the young generation)  I bet if I conducted an experiment among young college graduates and asked them to name some things on black culture, I would get music and food, the stereotypical things among those two things.  Above all else I wouldn't get hard work.  So what happened within the last 60 years that led to 1 in 3 black men going to jail or prison?  What happened within that time frame that lead to most black children being born to single parent households? (Of course being born in a single parent household doesn't necessarily mean both parents aren't involved with their children)  I know we get tired of hearing these things, particularly if you're not black.  Of course I also get tired of hearing these things.  Every race have their problems, yet this is a huge problem.  Too many black americans are falling by the wayside when it's not necessary.  Quite frankly there's just too much opportunity in this country, no matter how bleak things look, for this to be happening.

 

 

 

To continue from some of the things said in the video, perhaps the biggest reason why things are the way they are now, is not because of racism, but might be because of the integration of schools.  Now I'm not saying we should segregate again, that would be stupid.  Yet I often wondered a couple of times in the past were there any slight differences in the way a black student learns, from the white majority way of teaching.  I'm putting this into the cultural perspective.  There's this thing I heard, I don't know from where exactly or when.  I can't tell you if it is based on a real story, I heard it a while ago. (I can tell you it wasn't from a dream I had)  Perhaps once I share what I remember of the story, someone might have heard it as well and have more information concerning it.  

 

Someone wanted to test the knowledge of children from africa.  Not anything sophisticated, but basic knowledge I suppose.  So they went to a village somewhere in Africa, and asked the children to count the birds in a tree.  They counted ten birds in the tree.  It was then asked of them if someone shot one bird with a gun and it fell to the ground, how many birds would then be in the tree?  Their answer was zero.  The one who asked the question of course determined they got it wrong.  Yet it was explained to him the reasoning of the children.  If someone shot one of the birds, the sound coming from the gun would cause the remaining birds to fly away.  Thus there would be no birds left in the tree. (Whereas the reasoning of the one asking the question was simply thinking in terms of the question, and not real life scenario if I could say that)  Going back to my point on integration, back in the days of segregation, the saying was "seperate, but equal".  However we knew full well things weren't equal by any means.  In terms of school, the black schools weren't as fit as white schools.  Now, here's what I heard my relatives have said concerning those days..... 

 

 

What they really wanted was equal treatment.  Again in terms of school, they wanted the latest school books and better facilities.  They wanted the school busses to take the children to and from school, and also not have to sit in the back of the bus.  They wanted true equality.  They didn't really want to integrate. (One reason why is because in black schools, the teachers were free to discipline the students, such as giving them spankings when they got out of line.  Once you integrate, that kind of discipline goes out the door.  And of course black teachers lose their jobs.  You're not going to have a black teacher teaching white students)  Again what they wanted was for that slogan to truly hold up, and not necessarily integrate the schools.  So ultimately we integrated, and our cultures collided together.  If there were differences in culture, at least back then, both couldn't coincide with each other.  One had to rule, and we know which one that would be.  So for things like eye contact, one culture looks one in the eye, the other looks away.  Which one became the rule?  It was eye contact.  The culture that lost out, either adjusted or never learned to adjust.  So more than overt racism, I'm thinking perhaps the biggest reason why we see these overwhelming numbers of struggle within the black community is because of the cultural rejection.

 

 

 

I also want to expound a little bit on the school system and what's being taught.  Every where you look in school, the people you learn about, no matter what the subject, they are all of european descent.  For instance in the subject of science, you learn about cats like Galileo.  In english you learn about Shakespeare.  In math you learn about...., actually math might be one of the few subjects where there is diversity concerning the history of it, but who cares about math?  When it comes to anything concerning those of african descent, it's always surrounding slavery and the struggles afterward.  So if you're a black student coming up through the school system, the only contribution to the world you hear about people who resemble yourself, is surrounding the effort to survive racism and oppression.  Then some might wonder why so many kids want to grow up being a football player/basketball player or singer/rapper.  Those are some of the only things concerning black people that didn't immediately involve the topic of racism and the struggle, which I personally see racism and the struggle afterward as a very heavy topic.  Not that I'm disrespecting my ancestors, or that I'm ashamed of them.  When you really dig into the history of it all, you actually become inspired, no matter what race you are. (Because we are all humans)  I believe however we are taught about it in a way that either leads to guilt if you're white, or feeling sorry for yourself if your black.  In the black community we are taught like we've done nothing great in the world, and that we were enslaved because we weren't capable of anything great.

 

 

 

You don't see many black kids growing up wanting to be scientists.  The only black scientist we knew of growing up, might have been George Washington Carver.  You don't see many black kids growing up wanting to be doctors.  Most don't want to be teachers, then again, who wants to be a teacher? B)  (My mom was a teacher by the way)  In essence, I believe once we think about these things, it's easier to see why there is such a huge hole in the black community today.  Now again, every race have their problems.  However things are out of porpotion in the black community in terms of struggle.  The same can also be said for other communities in the US.



#5 Awesomeness!!

Awesomeness!!

    BangBang

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,399 posts
  • LocationArizona

Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:00 PM

Too many black people decide to live like idiots, thus driving down our communities. Thats really it. I know some incredibly dumb/smart/fat/skinny/ugly/beautiful black people that have found a niche doing something productive and they have happy family lives. Its honestly not THAT hard, and not as hard as some people want to make it out to be. Those people that choose not to take advantage of the opportunities afforded to them need to answer up to their own failures. That isn't my, or your job.



#6 Matthias

Matthias

    Senior Member

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,147 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 07:15 AM

Too many black people decide to live like idiots, thus driving down our communities. Thats really it. I know some incredibly dumb/smart/fat/skinny/ugly/beautiful black people that have found a niche doing something productive and they have happy family lives. Its honestly not THAT hard, and not as hard as some people want to make it out to be. Those people that choose not to take advantage of the opportunities afforded to them need to answer up to their own failures. That isn't my, or your job.

 

 

The problem is too many of us are struggling.  Sure, one day these numbers will go down as the years go on, but you're going to have a lost generation of people when it wasn't necessary.  I wouldn't totally blame the numbers on people just choosing to live like idiots.  There's that statistic that says 1 in 3 black men will be in jail or prison at some point in their lifetime, and that there are more black men in prison than in college.  Are we to believe that many people are choosing to live idiotically?  If that is true, what would that necessarily say about black americans?  So that can't be it.  I would agree if it were a small number, but these struggles are more than 50% when it comes to black men.

 

 

Again I brought up cultural misunderstanding and the overall outlook of black people in terms of success.  I like to watch a lot of scientific and geographical shows.  Rarely in these shows, do I see a black man or woman, especially concerning the subject of science.  This outlook is everywhere except in terms of sports. (And on a personal side note, I would love to see more diversity in all these things, including sports.  I don't want to just see black people in all my science shows, sports shows, and movies.  That's why I get excited when guys like Jeremy Lin cause a spark.  I'm still hoping he becomes a star player, but as of right now it doesn't look like he will.)



#7 Darth Biscuit

Darth Biscuit

    Dark Lord

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 33,986 posts
  • LocationWilmington, NC

Posted 23 August 2013 - 07:28 AM

Nice discussion here.

 

I wish we could (as a nation) put aside the divisions we create and not only talk about this stuff openly, but set the prejudice aside and work together.  It's better, but not there yet.



#8 g5jamz

g5jamz

    Is back

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,768 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:55 AM

http://www.wral.com/...able-/12807338/

 

It starts here...ignorance begets ignorance.



#9 Awesomeness!!

Awesomeness!!

    BangBang

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,399 posts
  • LocationArizona

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:22 PM

The problem is too many of us are struggling.  Sure, one day these numbers will go down as the years go on, but you're going to have a lost generation of people when it wasn't necessary.  I wouldn't totally blame the numbers on people just choosing to live like idiots.  There's that statistic that says 1 in 3 black men will be in jail or prison at some point in their lifetime, and that there are more black men in prison than in college.  Are we to believe that many people are choosing to live idiotically?  If that is true, what would that necessarily say about black americans?  So that can't be it.  I would agree if it were a small number, but these struggles are more than 50% when it comes to black men.

 

 

Again I brought up cultural misunderstanding and the overall outlook of black people in terms of success.  I like to watch a lot of scientific and geographical shows.  Rarely in these shows, do I see a black man or woman, especially concerning the subject of science.  This outlook is everywhere except in terms of sports. (And on a personal side note, I would love to see more diversity in all these things, including sports.  I don't want to just see black people in all my science shows, sports shows, and movies.  That's why I get excited when guys like Jeremy Lin cause a spark.  I'm still hoping he becomes a star player, but as of right now it doesn't look like he will.)

 

I see a ton of black people on Science Documentary's, and shows. One of the problems is that people, including black people accept the perpetual poverty myth as "how it is". For example, you stated that there are more black men in jail than college. That isn't true. It isn't true by a longshot, but how many people believe it is? There are a ton of black teachers, doctors, lawyers, scientists etc but they aren't covered on ESPN 24/7, and why should they be? It is true that black Americans struggle more than they should as a whole, but Irish Americans struggled when they can to this country. Black Americans "arrived" in the 1960's. It takes 3 generations to assimilate. The poverty rate is at 25% right now, which is lower than it should be. Black people will be fine, but nothing will change overnight, and there are no quick fixes. 



#10 Awesomeness!!

Awesomeness!!

    BangBang

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,399 posts
  • LocationArizona

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:32 PM

At the end of the day Black Americans that continue to be victims and believe in the "thats how it is" myth will continue to struggle. Black Africans have no problem coming over, obtaining Education and either staying working good jobs, or going back to Africa. There is a ton of racism and discrimination in this country but it doesn't stop the Africans. But like I said, in due time all of this will be ancient history, and racist comments on Yahoo will get rarer and rarer.



#11 TheRed

TheRed

    California Dreamin'

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • LocationCharlotte, NC

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:44 PM

Black Americans "arrived" in the 1960's. It takes 3 generations to assimilate.

 

........



#12 Awesomeness!!

Awesomeness!!

    BangBang

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,399 posts
  • LocationArizona

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:45 PM

........

 

Is my statement not true?



#13 TheRed

TheRed

    California Dreamin'

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • LocationCharlotte, NC

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:47 PM

Is my statement not true?

 

Are you trolling? What exactly is your definition of "arrived"?



#14 King

King

    A Cell of Awareness

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,765 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:35 PM

 

Skip to 23:35.



#15 rodeo

rodeo

    Keelah se'lai

  • HUDDLER
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,262 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:38 PM

Black Americans struggle because of a lack of neanderthal dna.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Shop at Amazon Contact Us: info@carolinahuddle.com